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Wacom Power Supply

Ranger RickRanger Rick Registered User regular
edited December 2006 in Help / Advice Forum
The power adapter to my Wacom tablet was apparently given away with no chances of return. I have several spare adapters laying around but none of them fulfill the 12v .1A requirements of the tablet. Would it do any damage to the tablet if I used a 12v 500mA (.5A) power supply? Or is it time to just order a new power supply from the Wacom website?

Ranger Rick on
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Posts

  • Brodo FagginsBrodo Faggins Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Whoa, what model tablet is it? I always thought they were powered by the USB plug.

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  • Ranger RickRanger Rick Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    It's an older 12x18 Intuos GD. It plugs in via serial port.

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  • stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    It won't be providing enough power to the tablet and might cause problems, or it could potentially damage the circuitry (just like a brown out can).

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  • bombardierbombardier mr. mully Vancouver, BCModerator mod
    edited December 2006
    100mA is less than 500mA. It can supply more than enough current.

    It should work fine.

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  • stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Oop, I read it backwards. Provided it is a switching psu, it will be fine. If it can't provide less than its max output, you could damage it.

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  • bombardierbombardier mr. mully Vancouver, BCModerator mod
    edited December 2006
    It should only draw the current that it needs though, V=IR right?

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  • stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    If the dc power adapter doesn't have a regulator (like most cheap dc adapters), it could be providing a different (higher) voltage at 100ma than it does at 500ma. The cheap ones are rated so many volts at so many amps and will produce that but vary otherwise.

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