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100 things we didn't know last year (+50)

ALockslyALocksly Registered User
edited January 2007 in Debate and/or Discourse
I don't think this will cause much debate but there's plenty here for discourse and it's appropriate for the new year.

I came across this article entitled "100 things we didn't know last year" which includes links to the articles that origionally reported these sometimes odd facts.

Some of my favorites were:

7. The lion costume from the Wizard of Oz was made from real lions.

64. Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobiacs is the term for people who fear the number 666.

68. The egg came first.

88. Nelson Mandela used to steal pigs as a child.

100. In the 1960s th CIA used to watch "Mission Impossible" to get ideas about spying

anything grab your attention?

edit: and in case you missed an_alts link further down, that worthy found another list with a slightly more scientific bent

ALocksly on
Yes,... yes, I agree. It's totally unfair that sober you gets into trouble for things that drunk you did.
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  • FunkyWaltDoggFunkyWaltDogg Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    There were only two that really struck me:

    5. Standard-sized condoms are too big for most Indian men. (link)

    69. Humans were first infected with the HIV virus in the 1930s. (link)

    A lot of them are rather Britain-centric, like this one:

    79. The best-value consumer purchase in terms of the price and usage is an electric kettle. (link)

    But I guess that's to be expected since it's a BBC article.

    Burnage wrote:
    FWD is very good at this game.
  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ALocksly wrote:
    68. The egg came first.

    That's always been my position.

  • ALockslyALocksly Registered User
    edited December 2006
    I think I ike this one too

    99. The term "misfeasence" means to carry out a legal act illegally.

    particularly how it relates to an unarmed naked man apparently posing sufficient threat to the police as to require deadly force (or at least the attempt of such)

    Yes,... yes, I agree. It's totally unfair that sober you gets into trouble for things that drunk you did.
  • AroducAroduc regular
    edited December 2006
    THIS IS A NEO RASA APPROVED FORUM GAME.

    With apologies to Terry Pratchett


    Thunder rolled.

    lightning2a7zyz0.jpg

    He rolled an 8 and begrudgingly passed the dice to the last player.

    The man shook the dice confidently in both hands before casting them onto what, for lack of a better word, chould be considered a table. The players drew a collected breath as they waited for the dice to stop rolling.

    And he won.

    "What can I say?" he laughed, "It seems like I'm favoring myself."

    He always won.

    None of the other players were surprised at all. The game was irrelevant, be it Ancient Civilizations, Conquerers of Catan, Floods and Droughts, or even something as simple as Who's the Heir, the outcome was decided as soon as soon as he began playing. You could try to watch for him cheating, but then your eyes left the board, and it wasn't until you tried to think about the game hours afterward that you came to the realization that he had dealt himself not even from the bottom of the deck, but from an entirely different set of cards entirely.

    There are signs that he is unusual. He can do tricks that made sparks leap and dance from his fingertips and his voice echoes with harmonics that make your teeth ache and your eyes ring. These are the small things that set him apart from the other players, slight clues in their apperances that reveal their true natures, though in the case of Quel'Shaggoth the Tentacled Monstrosity, somewhat less than slight.

    He is Predestination, Kismet... Fate, and while the other gods prefer games of dice and chance, he prefers to play with mortals on the board of the world. This is exactly why he smiled as two new players sat down across from him and spread the pieces for a new game out in front of him. The other players recognized it immediately and quickly gathered up what was left of their antes and made room for the other two.

    "Destiny of an Empire, is it? Kings wild? One true heir? Fate of the dynasty?"

    The lady's eyes sparkled and gleamed as she nodded to him. Fate and she were eternal rivals, lovers, enemies, and friends and she was one of the few who could best him. She gave him a knowing wink and if you looked closely enough into her eyes, you might catch a glimpse of a spinning coin falling into verdant infinity, or perhaps a clover in an endless field of green. She answered to no name, had no worshippers, and even in his darkest hour, no man would ever dare call on her. It is perhaps better that she remain nameless, but if her occupation could be described, it would be something like the waitress of the Last Chance Saloon.

    "The Wang Empire. One thousand years of rule about to come to an end due to 970 years of inbreeding and squabbling. It is here that the three most noble families shall be in dispute as to the rightful successor. The Dongs, the Hungs, and the Johnsons."

    "Johnssssonssss!?" hissed Quel'Shaggoth.

    The third player nodded, "Long, powerful family, responsible for the deaths of thousands merely for their own pride."

    The collective gods nodded. One thing they all understood was the value of life. The true writ of nobility is penned in blood and buttressed by a mountain of corpses for god and mortal alike.

    This one may have been a blind woman holding scales, or possibly a regal king wielding a sword of flame. Unlike the lady, he was known by many names; Karma, Revenge, Justice, Righteousness, but most often answered simply to Law. He was used to supplicants calling on him, and the other gods were used to watching his hands at all times. Just when you thought they had his empire beat, they would all too often find out that he'd been palming a Rightful Heir with an Ancient Retribution kicker.

    "Forget the dice, I don't trust either of you with them anyway. We shall play with our wits and win by tactics and cold steel alone."

    The other two nodded and began to divide up the pieces while the board started to come into definition and become a landscape.

    And on the landscape, there was a kingdom.

    And in the kingdom, there was a castle.

    And in the castle, there was a bed.

    And in the bed, the last emperor of the Wang Dynasty died.

    The pieces begin to move...


    This is a forum game somewhat similar in nature to the XXXshires of ODaM and the Phallas of D&D. The goal of the game is to A.) Survive and B.) Eliminate the other two families with claims to the throne. This is a game of intrigue, deception, betrayal and mob mentality. PMs are allowed. Loosely formed shadowy cabals are encouraged. Betraying your 'allies' for the sake of your family is lauded. Roleplaying is not required, and unless you really want to be a Chinese Warlord, not recommended, but being a backstabbing, conniving bastard certainly is.

    At the start of the game, players will be randomly and secretly assigned to the three families. Only their own identity will be known, and only to them. Each day, players will vote the Imperial Seal into the hands of a single player, who will then publicly decide on one player to put to death on the following day. In addition, each family will have one Executor of The Family Will who may assassinate one player of their choice during the night. If an Executor dies, the duties pass to a random member of their family the following day. When any person dies, their family will be revealed, but not any special roles they may have held. This will continue until only one family remains, who will be declared the winner.

    In addition, each family will have a number of players with unique roles:
    • An investigator who can learn the familial identity of another player each night
    • Brothers who begin the game knowing that they're of the same family
    • Corrupt officials who can artificially alter the vote once, giving the player of their choice the Imperial Seal for that night, though if multiple officials try to rig the vote, it will fail and their role publicly revealed.
    • Lovers... characters from different families who know the family of another player but take their own life if their lover dies.
    • Onmyouji Monks, who if they are alive during the Day of the Dead (Festival day around 5 or 6), their influence will protect all members of their family from death for that day.
    • A Spy, who learns the names that the two rival family investigators researched each night, but not the results.

    All the special role names and their exact mechanics will be posted before the game begins, though they will just be explicit specifications of the above with perhaps a tweak or two. There will be no hidden roles or abilities, and any questions anybody has about them will be publicly answered. Each family will have an identical distribution.

    The game is open to between 36 and 48 players so long as the number is evenly divisible by three. If there's sufficient interest, I might open it up to a few more, but don't count on it. Participation is vital, and you will be allowed to miss one vote without excuse before being killed for non-participation. In addition, in the event that a random death is needed (an Executor doesn't send in a kill, or the elected official doesn't provide a name to kill), I'm going to 'randomly' choose from the people who have missed the most votes and/or have participated the least.

    More specific information (results of tied votes, the possible weirdness of the endgame, etc) will be forthcoming when the game begins.

    With any luck, THE FIRST DAY WILL START ON SUNDAY AT 10PM EST. All days will end at 10PM EST, at which point flavorful results of the nights activities will be posted and the Imperial Seal passed onto the new holder.


    If you want to play, please post something along the lines of "I sign up" or "I'm in" or something along those lines.

    The larger and more colorful you make it, the better. Otherwise, feel free to use this thread to pre-emptively posture in and whatnot. If you want to optimize your enjoyment, I highly suggest making some loose alliances before the game even begins. Information and teams are the only currencies you'll have and you stand a very poor chance of surviving until the end of the game if you insist on being on your own.

  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    39. The world's fastest supercomputer will have its speed measured in "petaflops", which represent 1,000 trillion calculations per second.
    I R POASTING ON TEH INTARFLOPS!

    Elendil wrote: »
    said Aldo hazily, before clop-clop-clopping out of the room
  • ALockslyALocksly Registered User
    edited December 2006
    #78

    :lol:

    Yes,... yes, I agree. It's totally unfair that sober you gets into trouble for things that drunk you did.
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ALocksly wrote:
    #78

    :lol:
    I...but...why..huh?

    Elendil wrote: »
    said Aldo hazily, before clop-clop-clopping out of the room
  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    3. Urban birds have developed a short, fast "rap style" of singing, different from their rural counterparts. link

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    18. Up to 25% of hospital keyboards carry the MRSA infection.

    That's scary.

    73. George Bush's personal highlight of his presidency is catching a 7.5lb (3.4kg) perch.

    What about all his humanitarian work? Oh...right...

    76. In Bhutan government policy is based on Gross National Happiness; thus most street advertising is banned, as are tobacco and plastic bags.

    Cool.

    92. In a fight between a polar bear and a lion, the polar bear would win.

    This doesn't surprise me at all. Polar Bears are fucking huge.

    steam_sig.png
  • TankHammerTankHammer Extreme Ghostbuster Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Okay here's a personal new one for me:
    In the Star Trek universe, Vulcans must have sex once every seven years or they go on an insane, violent rampage.

    4icmw.jpg TankHammer | 2zivq6q.jpg
    yUApdW3.jpg
  • Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2006
    Okay here's a personal new one for me:
    In the Star Trek universe, Vulcans must have sex once every seven years or they go on an insane, violent rampage.

    Haha. Noob. Every true Trekie knows about the Vulcan pon farr.

    <.<
    >.>

    I'll be... you know... over there.

    SuperKawaiiWillSig.jpg
  • [Tycho?][Tycho?] Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    9. Fathers tend to determine the height of their child, mothers their weight.

    24. One third of all the cod fished in the world is consumed in the UK.

    68. The egg came first. [wtf?]

    96. Flushing a toilet costs, on average, 1.5p.


    A lot of those were known before. I mean, chicken and the egg? Its obvious the egg came first, I thought about this years ago. It was even the option of a slashdot poll as I recall. All you have to do is think about it for a few seconds and its pretty darn obvious.

    ragesig.jpg

  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    [quote=[Tycho?]]A lot of those were known before. I mean, chicken and the egg? Its obvious the egg came first, I thought about this years ago. It was even the option of a slashdot poll as I recall. All you have to do is think about it for a few seconds and its pretty darn obvious.[/quote]

    Yeah, plus the question never made any sense. A chicken doesn't somehow come from an egg; it is the egg.

    MSL59.jpg
  • Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2006
    When you come right down to it, the chicken and the egg question is really a question about the legitimacy of religion or science. Religion often dictates that the chicken came first because whatever god just poofed the chicken into existence, whereas science uses the concept of evolution whereby the first "chicken" came from an egg produced by a proto-chicken. BBC is declaring that science rocks and religion sucks.

    SuperKawaiiWillSig.jpg
  • TankHammerTankHammer Extreme Ghostbuster Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Okay here's a personal new one for me:
    In the Star Trek universe, Vulcans must have sex once every seven years or they go on an insane, violent rampage.

    Haha. Noob. Every true Trekie knows about the Vulcan pon farr.

    <.<
    >.>

    I'll be... you know... over there.
    Yes, but you see I don't like Star Trek and have never seen any of the original series. The new catch-phrase in our group is now "I gotta FUCK somethin! How pointy are your ears? Okay you'll do, get down there!" "...but baby I'll die!"

    It was introduced by a girl so it's funnier than it would have been otherwise.

    4icmw.jpg TankHammer | 2zivq6q.jpg
    yUApdW3.jpg
  • an_altan_alt Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    This list as titled is retarded. If it was called "100 Things We Reported This Year", it would be fine.

    Try this link http://www.tbo.com/life/MGBUFCRF5WE.html I pulled off digg for a better one. Some are just annual changes, but others are actually fresh knowledge.

    Pony wrote:
    I think that the internet has been for years on the path to creating what is essentially an electronic Necronomicon: A collection of blasphemous unrealities so perverse that to even glimpse at its contents, if but for a moment, is to irrevocably forfeit a portion of your sanity.
    Xbox - PearlBlueS0ul, Steam
  • GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I actually DID know #44, sort of- for every 10 that make it up Mt. Everest, one guy dies trying. I always thought it was 1 in 8; 1 in 11 isn't that far off.

    I have a blog. Read it. Blog-reading makes you pretty and popular.
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    an_alt wrote:
    This list as titled is retarded. If it was called "100 Things We Reported This Year", it would be fine.

    Try this link http://www.tbo.com/life/MGBUFCRF5WE.html I pulled off digg for a better one. Some are just annual changes, but others are actually fresh knowledge.

    That's a much more interesting list.
    26. Some 45 percent of Internet users, or about 60 million Americans, said they sought online help to make big decisions or negotiate their way through major episodes in their lives during the previous two years.

    Kinda scary that H/A is a growing trend. Soon everybody will ask what to do about the three hot women who want them (and how much sex they're having with each.)
    27. Of the 10 percent of U.S. teens who uses credit cards, 15.7 percent are making the minimum payment each month.

    I'm curious if that's higher or lower than the adult population.

    Trogg wrote: »
    Not as positive as AIDS and cancer, but positive nonetheless.

    PSN: QuipFilter
  • FlapkeFlapke Registered User
    edited December 2006
    38. Most of us have microscopic, wormlike mites named Demodex that live in our eyelashes and have claws and a mouth.

    AARGHH!

  • TankHammerTankHammer Extreme Ghostbuster Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Flapke wrote:
    38. Most of us have microscopic, wormlike mites named Demodex that live in our eyelashes and have claws and a mouth.

    AARGHH!
    Good Christ, this comment combined with your avatar made me loose it.

    4icmw.jpg TankHammer | 2zivq6q.jpg
    yUApdW3.jpg
  • GimGim Grand Emperor-Captain of the USS Waterghazi Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Flapke wrote:
    38. Most of us have microscopic, wormlike mites named Demodex that live in our eyelashes and have claws and a mouth.

    AARGHH!
    Good Christ, this comment combined with your avatar made me loose it.
    The adult mites have a semi-transparent elongated body that consists of two segments and is between 0.1 mm and 0.4 mm long. Eight short segmented legs are attached to the first body segment. The body is covered with scales for anchoring itself in the hair follicle, and the mite has pin-like mouth-parts for eating skin-cells, hormones and oils (sebum) which accumulate in the hair follicles. The mite's digestive system is so efficient and results in so little waste that there is no excretory orifice. The mites can leave the hair follicles and slowly walk around on the skin, especially at night.

    The total lifespan of a Demodex mite is several weeks. Mating takes place on the skin, and eggs are layed inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands. The six-legged larvae hatch after 3-4 days, and it takes about seven days for the larvae to develop into adults. The dead mites decompose inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands.

    An estimated 96-98% of all people carry such mites—with up to 25 in each follicle, each person can have a potentially huge population of mites. It is quite easy to look for your own demodex mites, by carefully removing an eyelash or eyebrow hair and placing it under a microscope.
    Someone! Set my face on fire! Kill them all dead!

    F9RE9J8.png
  • MentholMenthol Registered User
    edited December 2006
    32. Just 30 minutes of continuous kissing can diminish the body's allergic reaction to pollen, relaxing the body and reducing production of histamine, a chemical cell given out in response to allergens.

    mmm... I should tell my boss all about that.

    sigbz8.jpg
    You're not L33T enough for IDI/RN FTP!
  • FunkyWaltDoggFunkyWaltDogg Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Menthol wrote:
    32. Just 30 minutes of continuous kissing can diminish the body's allergic reaction to pollen, relaxing the body and reducing production of histamine, a chemical cell given out in response to allergens.

    mmm... I should tell my boss all about that.
    Obligatory :winky:

    Also, I should try that one on my wife. She sneezes all the time.







    :winky:

    Burnage wrote:
    FWD is very good at this game.
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2006
    That first list is teh gayz0rz. The other list posted, however, is teh rockz0rz.

    Which brings me to a question:

    How, exactly, do scientists go about discovering new elements? It seems like new elements are just discovered by folks shooting atoms of one metal at atoms of another metal. What about this, specifically, makes a new element? Is it the choice of metals used? Is it just a matter of how fast you're shooting the one with the other, meaning that the only reason we haven't discovered Element No. 237 the lack of a strong enough particle gun?

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • EndomaticEndomatic Registered User
    edited December 2006
    Tell her that having sex several times a day at the mans discretion will result in a milder or nearly non-existant menopause later in life.

  • MorgensternMorgenstern Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    3. Urban birds have developed a short, fast "rap style" of singing, different from their rural counterparts.

    That made me laugh so hard.

    “Every time we walk along a beach some ancient urge disturbs us so that we find ourselves shedding shoes and garments or scavenging among seaweed and whitened timbers like the homesick refugees of a long war.” - Loren Eiseley
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    How, exactly, do scientists go about discovering new elements? It seems like new elements are just discovered by folks shooting atoms of one metal at atoms of another metal. What about this, specifically, makes a new element? Is it the choice of metals used? Is it just a matter of how fast you're shooting the one with the other, meaning that the only reason we haven't discovered Element No. 237 the lack of a strong enough particle gun?

    My understanding is that these "new" elements are very, very unstable. Like tiny fraction of a second total existence. I think one of the largest issues is detecting/proving that you actually had some of it.

    Tiny like "A half-life of 0.89 ms was observed" says the mighty wiki.

    Trogg wrote: »
    Not as positive as AIDS and cancer, but positive nonetheless.

    PSN: QuipFilter
  • MentholMenthol Registered User
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    That first list is teh gayz0rz. The other list posted, however, is teh rockz0rz.

    Which brings me to a question:

    How, exactly, do scientists go about discovering new elements? It seems like new elements are just discovered by folks shooting atoms of one metal at atoms of another metal. What about this, specifically, makes a new element? Is it the choice of metals used? Is it just a matter of how fast you're shooting the one with the other, meaning that the only reason we haven't discovered Element No. 237 the lack of a strong enough particle gun?

    It's like if two buses get into a wreck and all the bodies get thrown out of the windows and are all heaped together.

    Or something. :P

    sigbz8.jpg
    You're not L33T enough for IDI/RN FTP!
  • gundam470gundam470 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Well unique elements are unique because of their basic properties...number of neutrons, protons, electrons...etc.

    So a new element would be a previously undiscovered combination of these? Barring that we know it's not an isotope of an existing element?

    Any chemists want to help out?

    gorillaSig.jpg
  • FunkyWaltDoggFunkyWaltDogg Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    gundam470 wrote:
    Well unique elements are unique because of their basic properties...number of neutrons, protons, electrons...etc.

    So a new element would be a previously undiscovered combination of these? Barring that we know it's not an isotope of an existing element?

    Any chemists want to help out?
    Unique elements are determined by the atomic number, which is equal to the number of protons. Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different atomic weights, which are caused by different numbers of neutrons.

    Burnage wrote:
    FWD is very good at this game.
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    gundam470 wrote:
    Well unique elements are unique because of their basic properties...number of neutrons, protons, electrons...etc.

    So a new element would be a previously undiscovered combination of these? Barring that we know it's not an isotope of an existing element?

    Any chemists want to help out?

    Protons are really what determines elementness. Differing isotopes are caused by variations within the number of neutrons in the nucleus.

    Edit: Beat'd. Ow.

    Trogg wrote: »
    Not as positive as AIDS and cancer, but positive nonetheless.

    PSN: QuipFilter
  • gundam470gundam470 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    gundam470 wrote:
    Well unique elements are unique because of their basic properties...number of neutrons, protons, electrons...etc.

    So a new element would be a previously undiscovered combination of these? Barring that we know it's not an isotope of an existing element?

    Any chemists want to help out?
    Unique elements are determined by the atomic number, which is equal to the number of protons. Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different atomic weights, which are caused by different numbers of neutrons.
    The identity of an element is the number of protons in its nucleus. Since protons repel each other, neutrons must be present in the nucleus to hold the protons together. For example, carbon has 6 protons in its nucleus by definition. To hold these protons together, it takes at least 6 neutrons. However, carbon atoms may also have 7 or 8 neutrons. Since carbon comes in more than one variety due to differing numbers of neutrons, carbon is said to come in more than one "isotope". All atoms are "isotopes". But each element has its most common isotope. Since many isotopes are unstable (radioactive), some people think the word "isotope" implies radioactivity, but really it doesn't.

    Yup.

    gorillaSig.jpg
  • IriahIriah Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Element 118, the one you always see greyed out on your periodic tables, has only existed once ever, and for a billionth of a second. Scientists haven't been able to replicate the experiment, but the computers clearly state it existed. That's how unstable this thing is.

  • an_altan_alt Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    16. A new planet described as a "super-Earth," which weighs 13 times as much as our planet, exists in a solar system 9,000 light-years away.

    18. Australian scientists discovered a polyrhachis sokolova, which is believed to be the only ant species that can live under water. It nests in submerged mangroves and hides from predators in air pockets.

    19. Red wine contains anti-inflammatory chemicals that stave off diseases affecting the gums and bone around the teeth.

    20. A substance called resveratrol, also found in red wine, protects mice from obesity and the effects of aging, and perhaps could do the same for humans.

    21. Two previously unknown forms of ice - dubbed by researchers as ice XIII and XIV - were discovered frozen at temperatures of around minus 160 degrees Celsius, or minus 256 Fahrenheit.

    I'd heard of resveratrol this year, but not the rest. It's amazing what one can miss even while trying to keep up with science news. Maybe I just pay attention to red wine news.

    Pony wrote:
    I think that the internet has been for years on the path to creating what is essentially an electronic Necronomicon: A collection of blasphemous unrealities so perverse that to even glimpse at its contents, if but for a moment, is to irrevocably forfeit a portion of your sanity.
    Xbox - PearlBlueS0ul, Steam
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2006
    Okay, okay, I know what an element is, how it's defined, and the notorious instability of the more massive elements. What I wanted to know is how, specifically, the tests are performed and observed in order to determine the existence of a new element. Why has element 118 only been seen once, for example? Is it hard to get the necessary energy to create it in the first place? Does it take a lot of luck? Does it take super-high-tech detection equipment that we only now have access to?

    Perhaps more pertinently, if we wanted to find element 119, how, precisely, would we go about it?

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • Darth WaiterDarth Waiter Cowboy Fwankenstein Livin' That DreamRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    That first list is teh gayz0rz. The other list posted, however, is teh rockz0rz.

    Which brings me to a question:

    How, exactly, do scientists go about discovering new elements? It seems like new elements are just discovered by folks shooting atoms of one metal at atoms of another metal. What about this, specifically, makes a new element? Is it the choice of metals used? Is it just a matter of how fast you're shooting the one with the other, meaning that the only reason we haven't discovered Element No. 237 the lack of a strong enough particle gun?

    I heard that if you shoot a lead BB at an aluminum sign it creates a new element known as you'll-shoot-your-eye-out 238. It's non-radioactive counterpart is you'll-shoot-your-eye-out 235, aka depleted you'll-shoot-your-eye-out.

    edit: Happy New Years to D&D.

    darthsig.jpg
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Does it take super-high-tech detection equipment that we only now have access to?

    The wiki link above mentions that they didn't detect 118, they detected some of the products of it's decay.

    Wiki has a rather extensive periodic table that even links to brief articles about how they've completely failed to find any of 119 and such. Link.

    Trogg wrote: »
    Not as positive as AIDS and cancer, but positive nonetheless.

    PSN: QuipFilter
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Does it take super-high-tech detection equipment that we only now have access to?

    The wiki link above mentions that they didn't detect 118, they detected some of the products of it's decay.

    Wiki has a rather extensive periodic table that even links to brief articles about how they've completely failed to find any of 119 and such. Link.

    See, more interesting to me than the higher numbers are the not-quite-so-high-but-almost-stable isotopes that we've been getting of late.

    Just posted to /. today - Isotope of Hassium (Element 108) lasts 30 seconds - which is obscenely long for atoms that high up.

    Here's a graphical representation of that "Island of stability" that's described.

    Nifty, nifty stuff.

    camo_sig2.png
  • EndomaticEndomatic Registered User
    edited December 2006
    27. Of the 10 percent of U.S. teens who uses credit cards, 15.7 percent are making the minimum payment each month.

    Does this mean that the other ~85% are making MORE than the minimum, or just not paying at all?

  • Chop LogicChop Logic Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    50. Researchers from the University of Manchester managed to induce teeth growth in normal chickens - activating genes that have lain dormant for 80 million years.

    Thats so fucking cool for so many different reasons.

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