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Adventure Game Project: I have an Idea Now! [Solved]

EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
edited November 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
As of late, I've decided that rather than just write stories and draw pictures to go along with them, that I'd like to make an interactive story for fun and giggles.

What I'm wanting to do is something similar to the old Monkey Island. Pretty much a sort of choose your own adventure with images and text, though rather than just have choice trees branching out displaying random images, I'd like to have variables and inventory and such. Now, I've been able to create a rudimentary image and text sort of game based of html pages, but I figure to do things like selecting doors and the like with a point and click interface I'm going to need to learn some sort of coding/design software.

The question is, what interface program/programming language/whatever should I be looking for? I'm willing to spend money, spend months and years of time learning new things through textbooks and the like, but I have no idea where to start.

Ideally, I don't want to use freeware/limited software like "Creature your Own RPG" games, mostly because I don't want my graphics and text bound to someone else's EULA. I'm looking for bare bones, ground up sort of things, or software meant for developers that I could buy and freely use for my own projects.

Being numerous as the stars and wise as the ancient ones, please impart your great wisdom upon me, oh wondrous H/A! Any ideas as to where to go from here?

UPDATE: Solved! Thanks for all the advice, guys! I'm going to work with Adventure Game Studio for now, (Switching to Flash when I have enough money in the new year). As usual, you guys are crazy awesome! Thanks!

Enc on
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Posts

  • Lord YodLord Yod Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

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  • PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Lord Yod wrote: »
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

    I know it just came out, and everyone is having giant four-hour nerdboners over it, but UE3 is probably enormous overkill for a point-and-click adventure game.

    OP: Sounds exactly like the kind of thing suited to a flash game. If you want a "proper programming language" you could use Java or Python - the latter has a fairly solid toolset in PyGame.

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  • EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    @Lord Yod - That might be a bit too far along for what I'm looking for, but It's definitely something to consider. Monkey Island meets Quake! Now the Chicken-with-a-pulley-in-the-middle has the added functionality of a bazooka.

    @PeregrineFalcon - That's pretty close to what I'm looking for, the only downside is the downloading requirements. Thanks! :D

    Ideally, I'd like to do flash and have it on a website (currently, my plan is to make a sort of special gift for a friend by making an adventure game. They visit the website and have to go through the game to get to the special gift at the end). I'm planning on picking up some books on flash and the like, anyone have any suggestions?

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  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/

    It makes Money Island style adventures. It has a huge, friendly community. It is very easy and fast to use. You can sell games created in it. It is free.

    Why use anything else? It is specialized for what you want to do.

    Unreal would be crazy difficult for a beginner to write a game in. Flash is expensive. Python is nowhere near the panacea that some people seem to think it is.

  • DeathPrawnDeathPrawn Registered User
    edited November 2009
    Do you have any prior programming experience other than static HTML pages?

    Adventure Game Studio is a great way to go. It's not just a "create your own RPG" type thing, it will let you make your own adventure game and do what you want with it without having to deal with the low-level engine coding. People will still have download your game instead of play it in a browser, but my impression is that you'll be able to give them a single executable instead of "here's my game, here's the extra stuff you need to run it".

    Flash definitely has a lot of things going for it in terms of your wants (namely, being able to embed it in a web page and not make people download proprietary software other than Flash, which they'll already have installed), and it's very easy to learn when compared to something like PyGame. The main downside is, as mentioned, its cost.

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  • TechnicalityTechnicality Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    The flashkit forums are very helpful if you are just starting out in flash games. The help docs are actually pretty good for it too, those are both what I used to learn.

    I would just try out lots of options (flash has a free trial last i checked), and you will naturally settle on something that is enjoyable for you. Flash isn't for everyone and has some problematic quirks, but for me it is perfect because I love just throwing things together in an afternoon for fun. Being able to show them online so easily is just a bonus.

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  • Mojo the AvengerMojo the Avenger Registered User
    edited November 2009
    If you're actually serious about spending months and years cracking textbooks you might as well leave the bush league shit behind and just learn C++, and various programming styles and methods. Object Oriented Programming is big, Procedural Programming is also a huge part of the programming landscape. There's more but those two approaches really run the show.

    Edit: you don't really need to buy anything besides a textbook. There's various integrated development environments you can shell out big money for, but Code::Blocks and Bloodshed DevC++ are pretty popular free options.

  • admanbadmanb the bored genie Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    If you're actually serious about spending months and years cracking textbooks you might as well leave the bush league shit behind and just learn C++, and various programming styles and methods. Object Oriented Programming is big, Procedural Programming is also a huge part of the programming landscape. There's more but those two approaches really run the show.

    Edit: you don't really need to buy anything besides a textbook. There's various integrated development environments you can shell out big money for, but Code::Blocks and Bloodshed DevC++ are pretty popular free options.

    Unless he wants to do professional game development or write his own 3D engine, learning C++ is overkill. A 2D sprite-based adventure game isn't gonna tax a modern computer, even in the least efficient language in the world.

    Learning to program is frustrating; programming C is frustrating. I don't want to imagine combining the two.

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  • theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Seconding Adventure Game Studio. Yahtzee of Zero Punctuation fame used it to make his Trilby adventure games. While I'm a programmer and certainly all for people learning to code, he appears to be first and foremost a writer and artist. Maybe later if he wants to write a different style of game he can pay a geek like me to write it. :P

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  • Mojo the AvengerMojo the Avenger Registered User
    edited November 2009
    Yeah it's not easy, but going from this:
    The question is, what interface program/programming language/whatever should I be looking for? I'm willing to spend money, spend months and years of time learning new things through textbooks and the like, but I have no idea where to start.

    Ideally, I don't want to use freeware/limited software like "Creature your Own RPG" games, mostly because I don't want my graphics and text bound to someone else's EULA.

    I got the impression he wanted more.

  • RentRent I'm always right Fuckin' deal with itRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Lord Yod wrote: »
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

    I know it just came out, and everyone is having giant four-hour nerdboners over it, but UE3 is probably enormous overkill for a point-and-click adventure game.

    Yeah, really? UE3 for a fucking point and click adventure game?

    "YOU ARE LIKELY TO BE EATEN BY A GRUE. UNLESS YOU HAVE THE ROCKET LAUNCHER, THEN YOU CAN BLOW IT TO SMITHEREENS WITH AMAZING SUPER-KILL TECHNOLOGY."

  • theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Oh right.

    In that case, take a CS course at uni. You need an introduction to programming in general, then you should learn OpenGL. I believe it works with Python these days, and its open source.

    I had sex with the Ecumenical Patriarch and he infected me with syphilis
  • UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Rent wrote: »
    Lord Yod wrote: »
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

    I know it just came out, and everyone is having giant four-hour nerdboners over it, but UE3 is probably enormous overkill for a point-and-click adventure game.

    Yeah, really? UE3 for a fucking point and click adventure game?

    "YOU ARE LIKELY TO BE EATEN BY A GRUE. UNLESS YOU HAVE THE ROCKET LAUNCHER, THEN YOU CAN BLOW IT TO SMITHEREENS WITH AMAZING SUPER-KILL TECHNOLOGY."

    I agree that it's overkill, but it's just an engine. You can make whatever you want with it. Could probably make the most recent Telltale Monkey Island episodes with it.

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  • PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Rent wrote: »
    Lord Yod wrote: »
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

    I know it just came out, and everyone is having giant four-hour nerdboners over it, but UE3 is probably enormous overkill for a point-and-click adventure game.

    Yeah, really? UE3 for a fucking point and click adventure game?

    "YOU ARE LIKELY TO BE EATEN BY A GRUE. UNLESS YOU HAVE THE ROCKET LAUNCHER, THEN YOU CAN BLOW IT TO SMITHEREENS WITH AMAZING SUPER-KILL TECHNOLOGY."

    I agree that it's overkill, but it's just an engine. You can make whatever you want with it. Could probably make the most recent Telltale Monkey Island episodes with it.

    Someone redid a portion of Monkey Island 2 in the fucking CRYENGINE, so it's not like it can't be done.

    But there's definitely more than just shades of the "when your only tool is a hammer" saying going on here. Just because you could use UE3 for this doesn't mean you should.

    Liking that Adventure Game Studio.

    Looking for a DX:HR OnLive code for my kid brother.
    Can trade TF2 items or whatever else you're interested in. PM me.
  • DeathPrawnDeathPrawn Registered User
    edited November 2009
    Rent wrote: »
    Lord Yod wrote: »
    Anyone interested in getting into making games should look at this, as it's an industry standard and can be used for just about anything you want.

    I know it just came out, and everyone is having giant four-hour nerdboners over it, but UE3 is probably enormous overkill for a point-and-click adventure game.

    Yeah, really? UE3 for a fucking point and click adventure game?

    "YOU ARE LIKELY TO BE EATEN BY A GRUE. UNLESS YOU HAVE THE ROCKET LAUNCHER, THEN YOU CAN BLOW IT TO SMITHEREENS WITH AMAZING SUPER-KILL TECHNOLOGY."

    I agree that it's overkill, but it's just an engine. You can make whatever you want with it. Could probably make the most recent Telltale Monkey Island episodes with it.

    Someone could make a 3D adventure game in UE3. A person with no experience in any compiled programming languages could not realistically do so without a beyond-reasonable time investment. I guess it's doable if you found a pre-made code base to work off and could write in a scripting language, but if that's the case then for the OP's purposes you might as well just use ActionScript or AGS.

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  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Personally, I've been writing C++ for nearly twenty years, a professional game developer for eight years, and I still wouldn't attempt to write an adventure in UE3 because it is entirely the wrong tool for the job.

    The right tools are AGS or Wintermute, both dedicated adventure game creators. They enable the average person to get a short adventure up and running within a week, rather than spending 6 months learning C++ or whatever.

  • EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Thanks for all the advice, guys! I'm going to work with Adventure Game Studio for now, (Switching to Flash when I have enough money in the new year).

    As usual, you guys are crazy awesome! Thanks!

    Guns make you stupid. Better to fight your wars with duct tape. Duct tape makes you smart.
    3ds Friend Code: 5043-2266-3066
This discussion has been closed.