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So, I've been given this rifle...

John MatrixJohn Matrix Registered User regular
edited December 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
My wife's uncle gave me a rifle for Christmas, a Browning A-Bolt with a Leopold scope. The rifle is a two years old and only fired a few times.

I'd like to know specifically what I have here. I can't tell what model of A-bolt I have from the browning website. It's a .270 with a 23-inch barrel. http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/family.asp?webflag_=001B

The Leopold scope says 3 x 9 VARI-X IIc around the front.

I guess what I'm looking for are cleaning and disassembly instructions, and/or manuals for the rifle and the scope.

I learned to shoot in the Cadets back in the UK, so I'm familiar with basic handling and maintenance, but it's been about a decade since I did that.

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Sorry for the crappy cell phone pics, but the last pic here kinda shows the odd tiny spots that are all along the barrel. Is this rust, or something common?

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Any help/advice you guys could give would be great.

John Matrix on

Posts

  • BackstopBackstop Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    You can call Browning and give them the serial number and they can tell you what you have. The website has a chart which ID's the model based on the serial number, but for rifles newer than 1998 it's useless. They will all use the same owner's manula, however, which is here: http://media.browning.com/pdf/om/abolt2manual.pdf

    An A-bolt is a fine rifle, and a heck of a gift. Do you think the scope came with the rifle or did the uncle buy it separately and mount it?

  • John MatrixJohn Matrix Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Ah, sweet, that manual will help loads, thanks!

    I don't know if he mounted the scope himself, but knowing him he probably bought it at the same time and had the dealer mount it for him. From the research I've done, it's a 50 mm 3 x 9. I've only fired from iron-sights and a SUSAT before, so I could use a manual/pointers for proper use of an optic like this.

  • BackstopBackstop Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    There's not much to know about a scope. There will be a ring that increase or decreases the zoom. Those knobs on the top and left side probably are caps that cover screws that adjust the scope up/down and left/right (usually it's slotted for a flat screwdriver). Usually those screws have lines radiating out so you can keep track of how far you've turned them - one mark is one inch at 100 yards.

    There once you hold it up to your face, you'll notice there are a couple of places you can hold your eye and see through the scope. One of these places is too close to the eyepiece of the scope, and when you fire the rifle it will kick back and bruise your eyebrow. This is called the Mark of the Rising Sun for reasons that become apparent after an hour or so. :) So practice putting your cheek on the same spot of the stock so this is avoided.

    After that, it's simpler than iron sights: put the cross-hair on the bulls-eye and take a good shot. Breath control, slow squeeze of the trigger. Unlike iron sights, once a scope is dialed in it's dialed in for everyone - it's up to the user to have his eye in the right place. The difference may be on the range you intend to shoot though. Most people set their scope to be right on target at 100 yards, but if you plan on shooting at 200 ot 300 all the time you might adjust up a little to account for bullet drop.

  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I have a .270. Have fun finding ammo for that thing.

  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Winchester, Hornady, and Federal all still manufacture .270. You should be able to get some at any Cabelas.

    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • GoofballGoofball Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    EskimoDave wrote: »
    I have a .270. Have fun finding ammo for that thing.

    http://www.ammoengine.com/

    and

    http://gun-deals.com/ammo

    Makes life easy finding the lowest prices for online ammo vendors. You can have ammo shipped straight to your house in the USA.

    Twitter: @ThaGoofball
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    There's also doubletap and buffalo bore. Not sure if they have any .270, but it's worth a look.

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  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Goofball wrote: »
    EskimoDave wrote: »
    I have a .270. Have fun finding ammo for that thing.

    http://www.ammoengine.com/

    and

    http://gun-deals.com/ammo

    Makes life easy finding the lowest prices for online ammo vendors. You can have ammo shipped straight to your house in the USA.

    jesus... that's ridiculous.

    I just remembered I have a .280, I used to use a .270 though. The .280 is the one that sucks for finding ammo for in Canada.

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