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The 2010 Resolution Thread or D+D Goes to the Gym

1246

Posts

  • LeitnerLeitner Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Sub 8%er here.

    Ladies.

    8-)

    (my target is to gain enough muscle to stop Tim Burton lamenting his lack of creativity)

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Don't worry. I'll be in the dark. All you'll see will be my lit cigarette.

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  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Leitner wrote: »
    Over 28%er here.

    Ladies.

    8-)

    (my target is to gain enough muscle to stop Tim Burton lamenting his lack of creativity)

    Man the internet has a strange way of distorting the truth 8-)

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    I highly encourage everyone to take progress photos- serious ones. Not just candids in optimal lighting and from complimentary angles. Take a shirtless photograph from the front and side (and back, if you'd like) in the same position of your home once a week or once a month or whatever. Even if you don't believe you'll ever muster the courage to make the photographs public, they can be a profound source of motivation.

    I have a decent photographic timeline of the second half of my weight loss... I'm still not comfortable posting it but even so it's one of the most effective things I did to make myself accountable to, er, myself.

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  • retrovmretrovm Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Robman wrote: »
    retrovm wrote: »
    Robman wrote: »
    retrovm wrote: »
    EggyToast wrote: »
    You single people doing it have my respect.

    yeah, i'm one of the solo ones. i work out with a friend sometimes, but my parents always ran together and i thought it was a nice idea. sometimes i do prefer to work out alone though, i get into the zone so to speak.

    the "looking good naked" factor is important and motivating as a single lady as well, haha.

    Oh please, to be "good looking" men have to basically have a body fat % of sub-10%, whereas women are generally viewed as unhealthy for dipping below 12-13%

    that is true, the double standard is weird. women naturally have more fat deposits as it is, so when women get too thin it just looks weird. i'm in the 20ish percent i think. i carry weight well as i'm proportionate at the very least!

    i like my dudes pretty average, but preferably in some kind of decent shape.

    15-20% is a good weight, so I wouldn't set my weight loss target to more then 5 lbs, and I'd be careful that I wasn't masking fat loss with muscle gain. Seriously, as a woman you need 15-20% body fat to properly buffer your hormonal fluctuations. The hollywood body with <10% BF in women is not healthy until post-menopause, when you're not having periods/pregnancy.


    yeah i would never ever want to be hollywood skinny, it's goddamn scary. i know that realistically a size 8 would be as low as i'd ever want to be, that's about 25-30lbs ago. i wear a 12 now. i also have to compensate for such annoying things as hips.

    also, what did you mean when you said 'masking fat loss with muscle gain'? i thought having lean muscle mass aided in fat burning. not like OMG JACKED lean muscle mass, but some.

    Blackjack wrote: »
    It's like putting an entire bottle of wine inside your five hour energy.
  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    a pound of muscle burns about 2 more calories compared to a pound of fat. As such, even if you replaced all your fat w/ muscle you'd still only burn, what, 40? 80? more calories per day? Muscle can help you exercise longer, though, which will aid in losing weight (because you burn more calories if you exercise longer).

    "masking fat loss with muscle gain" in general means that you stay the same weight but are more muscular. It's much more common in men, who can realistically gain a lot of muscle from weight training and exercise, although I've found that in general it's not really something that happens unless you're actually *trying* to do it. Eating a surplus of calories but exercising significantly will usually just give you muscles under your fat, because your body has no reason to burn your fat.

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    As a tubby, lazy man who has never stepped foot in to a gym, what should I expect when I rock up to sign up for a membership? I'm picturing someone taking my credit card and handing me over to someone called 'Suzie' or 'Sunshine', who parades me in front of a bunch of scoffing half-dressed hottie-totties while saying 'So, like, that's the Biggesizer, that's the Thigh-o-tron, and they're the Flim Flams! Enjoy!'

    Basically, will my hand be held for a while? Because I think I'd need it.

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    As a tubby, lazy man who has never stepped foot in to a gym, what should I expect when I rock up to sign up for a membership? I'm picturing someone taking my credit card and handing me over to someone called 'Suzie' or 'Sunshine', who parades me in front of a bunch of scoffing half-dressed hottie-totties while saying 'So, like, that's the Biggesizer, that's the Thigh-o-tron, and they're the Flim Flams! Enjoy!'

    Basically, will my hand be held for a while? Because I think I'd need it.

    Depends on the gym really. They may push you to sign up with a personal trainer, which wouldn't be a horrible idea if you think you need one. You could probably push them to give you a free training session or two.

    Most likely they'll just show you the gym, where the machines are, where the weights are, and set you loose. I know in my old gym they had staff that you could just go up to and talk to, and they would help you set up a workout plan on the spot. Thought that was really cool.

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  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited January 2010
    retrovm wrote: »
    yeah i would never ever want to be hollywood skinny, it's goddamn scary. i know that realistically a size 8 would be as low as i'd ever want to be, that's about 25-30lbs ago. i wear a 12 now. i also have to compensate for such annoying things as hips.

    also, what did you mean when you said 'masking fat loss with muscle gain'? i thought having lean muscle mass aided in fat burning. not like OMG JACKED lean muscle mass, but some.

    My ladyfriend went from probably a size 10 to somewhere between a size 0 and 2 over the past year. It was around 40 pounds plus a good amount of muscle development. She looks good at this size, and she didn't really look right carrying around the extra weight - it just looked superfluous and unwieldy on her.

    It depends a lot, I guess, on your body time and build.

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  • retrovmretrovm Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    retrovm wrote: »
    yeah i would never ever want to be hollywood skinny, it's goddamn scary. i know that realistically a size 8 would be as low as i'd ever want to be, that's about 25-30lbs ago. i wear a 12 now. i also have to compensate for such annoying things as hips.

    also, what did you mean when you said 'masking fat loss with muscle gain'? i thought having lean muscle mass aided in fat burning. not like OMG JACKED lean muscle mass, but some.

    My ladyfriend went from probably a size 10 to somewhere between a size 0 and 2 over the past year. It was around 40 pounds plus a good amount of muscle development. She looks good at this size, and she didn't really look right carrying around the extra weight - it just looked superfluous and unwieldy on her.

    It depends a lot, I guess, on your body time and build.

    yeah, it's all about height and build. i'm 5'7" or so and thankfully pretty proportionately shaped.

    Blackjack wrote: »
    It's like putting an entire bottle of wine inside your five hour energy.
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Kyougu wrote: »
    As a tubby, lazy man who has never stepped foot in to a gym, what should I expect when I rock up to sign up for a membership? I'm picturing someone taking my credit card and handing me over to someone called 'Suzie' or 'Sunshine', who parades me in front of a bunch of scoffing half-dressed hottie-totties while saying 'So, like, that's the Biggesizer, that's the Thigh-o-tron, and they're the Flim Flams! Enjoy!'

    Basically, will my hand be held for a while? Because I think I'd need it.

    Depends on the gym really. They may push you to sign up with a personal trainer, which wouldn't be a horrible idea if you think you need one. You could probably push them to give you a free training session or two.

    Most likely they'll just show you the gym, where the machines are, where the weights are, and set you loose. I know in my old gym they had staff that you could just go up to and talk to, and they would help you set up a workout plan on the spot. Thought that was really cool.

    Yeah, I have a feeling I could use some one-on-one guidance, at least for the first few sessions, or to establish some kind of 'progress' plan. I wouldn't know what the fuck I was doing otherwise.

  • ForarForar #432 Already prepping for Toronto Fan Expo!Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Yeah, I have a feeling I could use some one-on-one guidance, at least for the first few sessions, or to establish some kind of 'progress' plan. I wouldn't know what the fuck I was doing otherwise.

    A personal trainer wouldn't be wasted on you, by the sounds of it. If nothing else, you want to minimize the risk of injuring yourself with the free weights or machines. They should be an excellent font of information in regards to form, proper use of equipment and can include some helpful advice on things like nutrition, depending on their training/expertise.

    The last thing you want to do when starting up a new exercise regimen is to pull/strain/damage something, leaving you in a worse condition than when you started.

    My sister and I have always struggled a bit with our weights, so when I heard she was starting up at a gym a few years ago, I hooked her up with cash for christmas of that year to get a pesonal trainer for 10 sessions, and she's made excellent progress since.

    Personally, I survived 3 days at the gym last week (heavy on the cardio but including more free weights as the days go on) and am tentatively aiming for 4 this week. Going for an hour+ after work is fitting into my schedule quite well, it seems.

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  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Starting out with cardio is actually a really smart idea... pushing iron around really loads your cardio system with a spike in blood pressure, and you don't want to have a heart attack or an aneurysm.

    In other news... let's see about getting some goddamn progress photos up. Also, lots of people talking about goals without PMing me hard numbers, fix that! I'll add my own later today. If you feel unsure about showing off your body, then take a picture with your shirt on. No wangs plx. Remember to blur out your face, this is the internets.

    Also, let's get some progress reports in every 2 weeks. Next data due, say, end of Jan.?

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Just sent in my stats. I MAY post pictures. I'm mainly iffy cause I have psoriasis, and even though it's not severe, it's something I'm self conscious about.

    Anyways, an upside to only being able to workout during the weekends now is that I'm hitting the gym with determination to make up for lost time, and really pushing myself.

    Downside? I'm fucking sore!

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  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Nice thread. I think I'd like to join. I'm a small guy, 5'7" and the heaviest I ever got was 167, I'm at 151 as of this morning, and 140 would probably put me at a decent bodyfat %, assuming I concentrate on losing fat and avoid building more muscle.

    I worked out at home for the past year or so with dumbbells and an adjustable bench. To take my workouts to the next level, though, I realized I was going to have to sink in some serious cash on more equipment; way more than multiple years at the gym around the corner from my house. So I sold my home equipment and got a gym membership.

    My workouts are all coming from a book called the New Rules of Lifting, where basically all the exercises mimic real-life motions and the way your body moves, pushes, pulls, and lifts things outside of the gym. There are no bicep curls to be found in any workout in the book, I think... There are 9 workout routines in the book, 3 each for fat loss, hypertrophy (making muscles bigger) and strength (making muscles stronger). I'm just about done with fat loss I, and I'm not sure if I'm gonna do fat loss II or do hypertrophy I next.

    One thing I haven't seen anyone mention yet is nutrition... how is everyone changing their eating habits to reach their fitness goals? Exercise is only half of the equation...

    For easy diet-improvers... I don't drink anything with calories except for a little half n half in my coffee and adult beverages (which I'm also cutting down on...), and I avoid white carbs (potatoes, regular pasta, bread). I do more than just those two things (high-fiber carbs & veggies, healthy fats, lots of protein), but honestly, those two are the easiest and probably most effective way to cut bad calories.

    So what has D+D done on the nutrition side of things so far?

  • dragonsamadragonsama Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Ok I'm jumping in here. I made the "lose weight" resolution except I started it in mid December. So far I have been eating healthier/less and going to the Gym and hitting the cross trainer for about 40 minutes every day and lost 10 Lbs so far. But that's 10 of about 60 I need to lose. I'm trying to get down to about 180.

    The funny thing is I'm 5'9 have a large frame (broad shoulders) and statistics say I should weigh 150 lbs? That seams like skin and bones to me.

    Also while the cross trainer is nice I'd like to know what exercise I should I do to target the gut?

  • SageinaRageSageinaRage Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    dragonsama wrote: »
    Also while the cross trainer is nice I'd like to know what exercise I should I do to target the gut?

    If you're talking about fat loss, there's no spot weight loss. When you burn calories, your body decides where to lose them from. Just burn more calories and eventually you'll lose it.

  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    dragonsama wrote: »
    Ok I'm jumping in here. I made the "lose weight" resolution except I started it in mid December. So far I have been eating healthier/less and going to the Gym and hitting the cross trainer for about 40 minutes every day and lost 10 Lbs so far. But that's 10 of about 60 I need to lose. I'm trying to get down to about 180.

    The funny thing is I'm 5'9 have a large frame (broad shoulders) and statistics say I should weigh 150 lbs? That seams like skin and bones to me.

    Also while the cross trainer is nice I'd like to know what exercise I should I do to target the gut?

    Congrats on losing the 10 lbs! That's a great start!

    Anyways, if by statistics you mean BMI, ignore it. Brad Pitt has an obese BMI, IIRC.

    And to your question... you can't "target the gut." Spot-reducing fat is a myth. You can increase your calorie deficit so you lose weight faster, but the fat will come off wherever it wants to come off, in whatever order it wants to come off.

    I would recommend adding weightlifting into your workout routine. If you've been doing basically the same thing for a month now, your body is getting used to the routine; you're going to see the weight loss slow down soon, if you haven't already. Time to change up the routine to shock your body into burning more calories again.

  • TheMarshalTheMarshal Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    For me, the best thing I did nutritionally was to simply cut portions and eat smaller snacks throughout the day.

    For example, instead of a sandwich and chips and maybe some carrot sticks for lunch, I'd have just the sandwich, but I'd make up for it with a couple handfuls of nuts a few hours after lunch and some triscuits and cottage cheese a few hours before lunch. It trains my body to expect smaller amounts of food, and keeps it working on digestion throughout the day, which I imagine burns more calories.

  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    dragonsama wrote: »
    Ok I'm jumping in here. I made the "lose weight" resolution except I started it in mid December. So far I have been eating healthier/less and going to the Gym and hitting the cross trainer for about 40 minutes every day and lost 10 Lbs so far. But that's 10 of about 60 I need to lose. I'm trying to get down to about 180.

    The funny thing is I'm 5'9 have a large frame (broad shoulders) and statistics say I should weigh 150 lbs? That seams like skin and bones to me.

    Also while the cross trainer is nice I'd like to know what exercise I should I do to target the gut?

    Liposuction is the only way to "target" fat, and it's horrible for you. And statistics are worthless. You can guesstimate your body fat % using the cartoons in the OP, a healthy male body fat % is sub 15%. A sculpted six-pack is actually really hard to get, you go from lumbly bumps to well defined muscle groups going from 25 to 15%, but cutting your fat content in half from there becomes increasingly difficult. Your body likes having fat. It buffers hormonal levels, provides an excellent energy reserve, and keeps you warm. You can realistically expect to lose 1-3 pounds per week until you hit that 10-15% level, at which point you shouldn't try to cut more then a pound a week of fat, or your body will just give up muscle mass instead.

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    For anyone starting out, I got two tips regarding nutrition:

    1)Count calories for at least a week or two. Sites like sparkpeople or dailyplate are awesome for this. When I first started to really try and loose weight I did this, and I was amazed by how many calories some of the stuff I ate all time had. Like one meal at Whataburger being almost 75% of my recommended intake or how many calories sodas and candy bars had.

    2)Don't think of it as a diet, but a lifestyle change. Diet to me always sounded bad and worse, temporary. Just think of it as changing your lifestyle. That way when you do eat more than you should (And it'll happen) you don't feel like you failed. That really worked for me.

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  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    It's not even that hard. Eat a big healthy breakfast. A small, healthy lunch. A decent snack at some point. A healthy dinner. Very little pop. Lots of water, tea and coffee, hold the cream + sugar. Replace carbs with fruits and veggies, they taste better.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Replacement doesn't work for everyone, and it's also not foolproof. Kyougu's point is one I often bring up -- there are a lot of surprise foods that you think would be good but actually aren't. If you know the calories it's dead simple to made diet decisions before you even hit the grocery store or the restaurant.

    For example, seafood is all-around better for you than land animals (barring some fatty fish like catfish). Shrimp is a "wonder food" but a lot of people eat shrimp with butter, so you take this wonderfood and dip it in calories, because you might totally overlook that sauces/dips can have a ton of calories in them. It also works the other way -- you find foods that are surprisingly low-calorie for what they are. I often bring up a Whopper Jr. w/ no mayo as an example (290 calories -- the same as most any Lean Cuisine frozen lunch), especially since it costs a dollar.

    I lost 20 pounds last year by essentially just eating seafood cooked in healthy ways instead of land animals cooked in healthy ways. Sure, I also reduced the number of carbs I ate, but meats/proteins are the way to stay full through a diet.

    In other words, a lot of people are confused as to what "healthy foods" actually are. Knowing your calories helps make it a lifestyle change.

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Weight loss is simple: Cut carbs, sugar in particular. Eat tons of protien and don't worry about dietary fat so much since it doesn't really transform into bodyfat. Sugar and simple carbs do, however. Most fat-free foods have the fat replaced by sugar, not a good trade. Diet is easily 75% of losing weight. Eggs and milk are good for you; consume them. Tuna, chicken, salmon, and beef make up the rest of the bulk of my diet in that order. I do eat bread occasionally and get my greens in along with a multivitamin just in case. The only other supplement I take is fish oil, for general cardiovascular health and its weight loss and antiinflammitory benefits.

    Buy Starting Strength and get in the gym. Do deadlifts, presses and squats. Compound exercises work much better than isolation exercises. Don't be afraid of the gym. Everybody starts somewhere and nobody is paying attention to you unless you are doing douchey things like bicep curls in the squat rack.

    My goal for this year: get from 200 lbs to 175 while getting stronger. I lost 30 pounds last year, no telling how much fat because muscle replaced a lot of it.

    I'm not going to say it was easy, but it was simple.

  • TaranisTaranis Must be the feeling, it brings to you That makes you do what you doRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    I'm 5'9" and I weigh ~195lbs right now.

    My goal is 167lbs by the end of the semester (or by spring break ideally), since that's how much I weighed when I had a six pack.

    I'm going to start working out today. I'll probably start on a 6 day work out play with one day for rest. I'm going to switch over to a high protein diet with 6 meals a day. I want to restrict my diet to only ~40% carbs. I'll probably hit up my school's nutritionist for help with this.

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  • KilroyKilroy The Architect Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    So how can I, as a vegetarian, make sure that I'm getting enough protein for effective weight loss and muscle gain? So far I've been relying mostly on eggs and unsalted nuts, but I'd like to know if there are other things available.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    What kind of vegetarian are you

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • KilroyKilroy The Architect Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    No meat, no seafood, animal products like milk and eggs are fine.

  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Kilroy wrote: »
    So how can I, as a vegetarian, make sure that I'm getting enough protein for effective weight loss and muscle gain? So far I've been relying mostly on eggs and unsalted nuts, but I'd like to know if there are other things available.

    Egg whites are a reasonably low calorie source of protein, shakes are a godsend for the veggie types. Lots of whey, blueberries, banana, and milk in in the blender. Gives you the protein, calcium and potassium you need to build muscles.

  • TaranisTaranis Must be the feeling, it brings to you That makes you do what you doRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Milk is a great source of protein, it even has both casein and whey in it.

    Aren't soy alternatives to most meats available?

    I generally eat food that has mostly protein, a negligible amount of fat, and a minimum amount of carbs. Get in the habit of checking the nutrition facts on everything you buy and eat.

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  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited January 2010
    went to the gym again today. did 3 miles consecutive on the treadmill at 6 mph, then did about another mile at like 4 mph as a cooldown. then I did some light benching, rows, seated curls, military presses (all dumbbells) and triceps pulldowns.

    I am not a huge fan of isolation exercises but seriously my triceps need some catch-up.

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  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited January 2010
    As far as nutrition goes, I eat a lot of cottage cheese and greek yogurt and salads (with taboule, hummus, cherry tomatoes, kalamata olives and a homemade dijon viniagrette) when I am at home. When we go out I have a hard time avoiding the rice, especially because we eat a lot of asian food.

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  • KilroyKilroy The Architect Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    I hadn't thought about making shakes. That sounds excellent.

    Gonna hit the gym tomorrow. My goal is to drop 30 pounds by April.

  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Kilroy wrote: »
    I hadn't thought about making shakes. That sounds excellent.

    Gonna hit the gym tomorrow. My goal is to drop 30 pounds by April.

    Shakes are seriously great. Yeah, you feel like a raging tool-bag when you buy the protein, but it's tasty and lets you recover faster.

  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    went to the gym again today. did 3 miles consecutive on the treadmill at 6 mph, then did about another mile at like 4 mph as a cooldown. then I did some light benching, rows, seated curls, military presses (all dumbbells) and triceps pulldowns.

    I am not a huge fan of isolation exercises but seriously my triceps need some catch-up.

    Try close-grip bench press and dips for triceps.

  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited January 2010
    wallaka wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    went to the gym again today. did 3 miles consecutive on the treadmill at 6 mph, then did about another mile at like 4 mph as a cooldown. then I did some light benching, rows, seated curls, military presses (all dumbbells) and triceps pulldowns.

    I am not a huge fan of isolation exercises but seriously my triceps need some catch-up.

    Try close-grip bench press and dips for triceps.

    Good call on the dips. I don't have a spot and would be embarrassed to ask any of the juicers at my gym to spot whatever girl weight I could manage on a close-grip bench, so I will try the dumbbell analog.

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  • TaranisTaranis Must be the feeling, it brings to you That makes you do what you doRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    For triceps I prefer: dips, skull crushers, french press, and high pulley overhead tricep extension with the rope. Close hand push ups are pretty good as well.

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  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Pushups are amazing, especially when you get into funky one like Santana Pushups

  • TheMarshalTheMarshal Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Man, I need to start working out in the evening again. I've been getting my exercise in the morning, but it pretty much limits me to ~30-35 minutes before I have to get ready to go to work. It's usually enough, but it doesn't allow for 5-6 mile runs, bike rides of any reasonable distance, or bricks.

    My favorite workout was waking up, having a light breakfast, then biking to the pool at SJSU (about 6-7 miles away), swimming for 20 minutes, then biking the rest of the way to work (another 4-5 miles). I got to fit in a brick, which made me happy.

  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    It's been demonstrated that we have better athletic performance in the evening.

    My mom is starting her second career as a personal trainer/pilates instructor, holy fuck my abs are sore. I have a new found respect for those toned 40 year olds, I know the pain they endure to get back to the college body.

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