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Sedentary Lifestyles suck. Now how do you really fix one?

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Posts

  • ArlingtonArlington Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Baby-steps.

    Start by going for walks, hiking, etc...then start at a gym at least twice a week and bump that up to three times. Don't go all out when you start the gym either. Just because other people are there and doing these insane work-outs doesn't mean you need to start falling into that as well. Start at your comfort level and then just push yourself from there.

    I'm still trying to claw my way out of a sedentary lifestyle. It's been hard work, but I've already seen some improvements.

    I'm a big fan of taking it slow. Especially after doing more harm then good to my joints by "jumping in full throttle" I'm still trying to decipher what is good pain vs. bad pain (really muscle pain vs joint pain for me).

    Not really sure how bad a shape you are in but a really really easy thing to do, when ever you need to drive to the store, always park as far away from the front door as you can. You can build up from there.

    A personal example of acknowledging (and compensating for) you weakness would be, for me personally, once I get home I stay home. So instead of planning to goto the gym and continually putting it off, I go to the gym right after work.

    I also work with a physical trainer, which is good for several reasons. I have an appointment to keep, and I'm pretty clueless about my own body.

  • CorvusCorvus Winter crow VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    I am not really a team sort of guy. As a kid, I never played team sports, but I've found later in life that participating in recreational team sports is really good for you. For me, I started out with Dragonboat racing. Though I've since moved on to other things on the water.

    adbf_2003_vancouver_dragonboat_race_boat_3_dt_5406b.jpg

    500 meter crazy sprints are tons of fun. And anyone can Dragonboat. There are teams of breast cancer survivors, organ transplant recipients, and the blind.

    Having a team activity is a good way to meet new folks with healthy habits and is usually more fun than say, the gym. It's a nice compliment to a gym routine to have something fun and active to do.

    I think a lot of inactive folks, and I've seen this in H/A and also in my own life when I wasn't active, are hesitant to go out and try these kinds of things. It's easy to think that people are going to be judgmental or give you a hard time. In my experience though, people are usually very welcoming and patient with new people if you are going to a recreational program, whether it is squash, paddling, or say, a learn to run clinic at your local running store.

  • BaronVonNubBaronVonNub Registered User
    edited January 2010
    HeraldS wrote: »
    Step 1: Take a picture of the other driver (future you if no changes are made) and hang it everywhere you normally sit around and do nothing- by your TV, computer, refrigerator, and one on your nightstand too. Before you sit down to play video games or fuck around on the computer and before you go to bed at night, ask yourself, "Have I done what I need to do today to make sure I don't end up like that?". If the answer is no, sorry, you don't get to play/ waste time/ sleep until the answer is yes.

    I think the image you chose is very much backwards, you need to think of who you want to be, not who you don't. Never set a goal inside a negative. The brain is a pretty sensational thing and to spare you the details, it's always better for yourself to hold a positive image inside it.

    Anyway, you must also accept that it's an ongoing process and the very fact that you are participating in the process (however small the steps are) is in itself a validation of your eventual goal. I can't overstate this point, once you start, you have already won. Keep going. The satisfaction will gradually snowball and inspire.

    Also remember to not beat yourself up over minor setbacks. (don't take yourself so seriously because hey, no one else does!).

    This is all pretty general but that's just how I view forum threads like this, it's not exactly a one-to-one session.

    EDIT: I just noticed you're putting the negative image on the things he wants to reduce, I must have skim read that or something, it's not as harmful as I first thought in that case.

  • TeyarTeyar Registered User
    edited January 2010
    So, okay. All kinds of wild suggestions this that and the other way for possible activities, many of which sound fascinating... And almost none of which are suitable for mid-winter small town Vermont. And I hate the woods before anyone says it. :P

    But good stuff, guys, seriously. The basic starting point seems to be diet... And from what I'm gathering the best way to start there is A, cut out soda, and B, cook stuff that dosent just come out of a box.. One's easy... The other not so much. Any good websites or books for cooking-for-the-raised-on-mac-cheese-crowd pop into anyones head?

    Kick At The Darkness Until It Bleeds Daylight
  • MorninglordMorninglord Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Teyar wrote: »
    So, okay. All kinds of wild suggestions this that and the other way for possible activities, many of which sound fascinating... And almost none of which are suitable for mid-winter small town Vermont. And I hate the woods before anyone says it. :P

    But good stuff, guys, seriously. The basic starting point seems to be diet... And from what I'm gathering the best way to start there is A, cut out soda, and B, cook stuff that dosent just come out of a box.. One's easy... The other not so much. Any good websites or books for cooking-for-the-raised-on-mac-cheese-crowd pop into anyones head?

    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    A good one is to explore a place you haven't been to before, if you want an excuse for a walk. My gf and I will often go explore a part of the city we haven't seen on foot, just to see what cool things there are. It's very good for cheering you up and making you feel less like a slug.

    Location: Sydney, Australia
    My Dark Souls 2 Diary Day 6 and 7 Updated
    (PSN: Morninglord) (Steam: Morninglord) (WiiU: Morninglord22) I like to record and toss up a lot of random gaming videos here.
  • never dienever die Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Teyar wrote: »
    So, okay. All kinds of wild suggestions this that and the other way for possible activities, many of which sound fascinating... And almost none of which are suitable for mid-winter small town Vermont. And I hate the woods before anyone says it. :P

    But good stuff, guys, seriously. The basic starting point seems to be diet... And from what I'm gathering the best way to start there is A, cut out soda, and B, cook stuff that dosent just come out of a box.. One's easy... The other not so much. Any good websites or books for cooking-for-the-raised-on-mac-cheese-crowd pop into anyones head?

    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    A good one is to explore a place you haven't been to before, if you want an excuse for a walk. My gf and I will often go explore a part of the city we haven't seen on foot, just to see what cool things there are. It's very good for cheering you up and making you feel less like a slug.

    My gf really got me in the habit of this, and its great. If you aren't in a relationship, take a friend. Heck, sometimes its great to just go by yourself. You can really learn to appreciate the world and nature once you've begun to explore it.

    Also, the best advice in terms of exercise is, like people have said, just find something you enjoy. For me, it was ultimate frisbee. Over the course of at least two or three pick-up games a week for a semester of college I lost 20+ pounds, going from 260ish before the begining of the semester to 230ish by the end of it. I also only really cut out lots of soda from my diet, I still ate things such as Taco Bell. If I personally can get better at cutting out sodas and the like, I would probably be in better shape physically.

    As well, joining a group activity like frisbee is a great morale booster. Nothing beats people cheering you on when you are finally able to get a throw down, begin to score, and just generally get better at the game. The feelings of accomplishment from that are quite exilierating. So if you can, find some sport that you think you might like, and just make time to do it. I mean, I didn't even know I would like frisbee until my room mate invited me out for a game.

    Spoiler:
  • TeyarTeyar Registered User
    edited February 2010
    Tax return was good this year.

    Buyin a wii + fit.

    Kick At The Darkness Until It Bleeds Daylight
  • Namel3ssNamel3ss Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    South host wrote: »
    A lot of the time, I'll make myself do calisthenics whenever I mess up in a game. I died? 20 pushups, 40 situps. Failed an objective? 15 deep lunges, 40 crunches. Probably not as good as walking while playing a game, but better than nothing.

    I did something like this to curb alcohol consumption, I charge myself 30 pushups for a drink. It makes you think twice about that 4th beer when you've already done 90 pushups. :)

    May the wombat of happiness snuffle through your underbrush.
  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Careful with all those pushups, you can end up overdeveloping your chest in relation to your back, which can cause a lot of shoulder problems.

  • Namel3ssNamel3ss Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Robman wrote: »
    Careful with all those pushups, you can end up overdeveloping your chest in relation to your back, which can cause a lot of shoulder problems.

    Its not my only exercise, I make it to the gym 3x a week, one day is squats and core, one is pullups, pulldowns, rows, arm/chest/upper back free weights and the 3rd day is high intensity hit-every-muscle-group. On my offdays I go to a indoor rock climbing gym for bouldering for a couple hours or do yoga/calisthenics at home.

    May the wombat of happiness snuffle through your underbrush.
  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Robman wrote: »
    Careful with all those pushups, you can end up overdeveloping your chest in relation to your back, which can cause a lot of shoulder problems.

    Hmmmm...this sorta clicked with me. Whenever I do, say, more than 10 push-ups, I end up feeling paint in my shoulders. It's almost like a bone slipping or cartilage rubbing against bone. It hurts and I usually stop - any clue what the hell that may be?

    I have a very broad chest...very German build.

    sig.jpg
  • RobmanRobman Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    Robman wrote: »
    Careful with all those pushups, you can end up overdeveloping your chest in relation to your back, which can cause a lot of shoulder problems.

    Hmmmm...this sorta clicked with me. Whenever I do, say, more than 10 push-ups, I end up feeling paint in my shoulders. It's almost like a bone slipping or cartilage rubbing against bone. It hurts and I usually stop - any clue what the hell that may be?

    I have a very broad chest...very German build.

    You probably need to strengthen your rotator cuff support muscles, although a quick trip to the doctor would be prudent.

  • ArlingtonArlington Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Teyar wrote: »
    So, okay. All kinds of wild suggestions this that and the other way for possible activities, many of which sound fascinating... And almost none of which are suitable for mid-winter small town Vermont. And I hate the woods before anyone says it. :P

    But good stuff, guys, seriously. The basic starting point seems to be diet... And from what I'm gathering the best way to start there is A, cut out soda, and B, cook stuff that dosent just come out of a box.. One's easy... The other not so much. Any good websites or books for cooking-for-the-raised-on-mac-cheese-crowd pop into anyones head?

    If your looking for indoor activities, someone else mentioned wii fit, but you can walk around the mall if you have an indoor mall close by.

    Or even an out door one, since the sidewalks etc will most likely be cleared of any snow.

    A gym obviously offers a variety of indoor exercises, but I would hold off on a gym to start. Maybe do some walking in the winter, once the weather warms up check out some of the activities people mentioned. Then when it gets cold again you can evaluate a gym membership.

    Diet is always good to look at, especially since there seems to be so much unhealthy stuff being sold. There have been two threads recently that talked about diet. This thread is a pretty interesting read about that:

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=109110&highlight=diet

    The long and short if it is that low fat diets suck. Most foods that are low in fat are stuffed with carbs to compensate (otherwise they would taste like plastic). This is bad, especially when taken in conjunction with the fact that protein is relatively expensive. Way too many items you end up eating consist of mostly carbs as your source of energy. Which is bad for various reasons.

    As far as recipes, I don't have many. But try stuff like cottage cheese and pineapple as a nice simple recipe that has a good ratio of protein, carbs and fat. Cottage cheese is like diet wonder food. Its a complete protein that has little to no carbs and a good ratio of protein to fat. Just add carbs to have a quick simple complete meal.

    I'm no expert, but this is what I've picked up trying to do the same thing as you.

  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Robman wrote: »
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    Robman wrote: »
    Careful with all those pushups, you can end up overdeveloping your chest in relation to your back, which can cause a lot of shoulder problems.

    Hmmmm...this sorta clicked with me. Whenever I do, say, more than 10 push-ups, I end up feeling paint in my shoulders. It's almost like a bone slipping or cartilage rubbing against bone. It hurts and I usually stop - any clue what the hell that may be?

    I have a very broad chest...very German build.

    You probably need to strengthen your rotator cuff support muscles, although a quick trip to the doctor would be prudent.

    Pushups are pretty hard on your shoulders, in general. Especially if you do them correctly, but I've never had pain at 10. I did bazillions of them when I was in the Army with no immediate ill effects, and I was way out of shape and chubby when I joined.

  • AtomikaAtomika Merry Christmas your arse I pray God it's our lastRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I'm fighting against a sedentary lifestyle since the start of the new year. What the sedentary need to realize is that:

    - Being sedentary means you're burning less energy. So restrict your input. No grown man needs more than 2200-2500 Calories a day, and if your build is average or small, it's probably less than that. Women, same thing, but fewer calories. Probably a cap at 1500-1800. The trick to meeting this is not restrict the volume of your daily intake, but the caloric count. Just by cutting out sugared drinks (coffees, sodas, energy drinks, Gatorade, concentrated juices) and minimizing your red meat will probably initially take 500-1000 calories out of your daily diet.

    - When you're not at work, burn some calories. You don't have to be a dynamo to reduce your net caloric intake. Just 30 strenuous minutes a day of jogging, biking, or aerobics will cut 300-500 calories, daily. Personally, I like recumbent bikes. They're easy on your back and joints, and you still get your cardio in. If your excess weight causes a lot of strain and pain, it's the way to go. I still have bad knees and back from football in college, so it's better to me than running. Plus, I can still do work on my iPhone or read or watch TV while I'm doing it.

    - Eat smarter, not less. You probably went your whole life being told certain foods were better than others. Well, unfortunately, just about every formerly "healthy" food isn't, and just about every formerly "bad" food really isn't either. Carbs are just bad, period. Don't cut them out entirely, but sure as hell restrict them. Where the carbs get you is snacking, as just about every snack food is carb-laden, and often insidiously so. Sure, a cupcake is bad for you, but one cupcake is better than a baked potato, and if you like sour cream and bacon, go ahead and have two cupcakes. So instead of chips or pretzels or anything of the corn/potato/rice flour family, get some fresh vegetables. If you need it sweetened up, add a little peanut butter: it's high protein and the fiber cuts the carbs. Bottom line? Count the calories, don't assume anything.

    - Make friends with olive oil and butter. They're both very low in transfats, and both extremely flavorful. Don't eat anything deep-fried, and don't eat anything breaded. The breading probably has twice the calories of whatever it's wrapped around. Bake or roast your pork, chicken, or seafood. Pan-fry if you have to. A four-egg omelet with chicken, cheese, and vegetables will take up an entire plate and only get you about 400 calories; a single McGriddle is about 600 calories.

    - Oh yeah. Learn how to cook. I'm not talking about becoming the next Mario Batali. I just mean competency in the kitchen. Why? The world is full of places ready to overload your daily intake. Did you know that a single cheeseburger with fries from Ruby Tuesday's exceeds the total daily recommended intake for an average woman? It's fucking crazy out there. Instead, cook at home, and do it often.

  • ArlingtonArlington Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    No grown man needs more than 2200-2500 Calories a day, and if your build is average or small, it's probably less than that.

    I really enjoyed your post, but I need to nit-pick this one statement.

    It's just too broad a statement. Take me for instance. I'm still obese (but working on it). I weight 291 pounds with a target "feel good" weight of about 250-260 pounds. That's with about 3-4 hours a week of strenuous exercise and another hour or two of light exercise. I would go absolutely ape shit trying to stick to a 2200 calorie a day diet. To the point of sabotaging myself most likely.

    My diet is 3100-3600 calories a day, and I'm still slowly losing weight. The important part is that my diet consists of the correct ratio of protein/fat/carbs, and that it is broken up between 5 or 6 smaller meals.

    An even bigger outlier would be Michael Phelps. With his muscle mass and exercise level, he needs something crazy like 6000-10,000 calories a day when training.

    Really your numbers probably aren't that far off, it's just that we don't know enough about the OP's weight or muscle mass to say what numbers are right for him.

    I also bring it up because restricting your calorie intake while trying to become more active can be counter productive. Before switching to my current diet, I was eating less calories (but more carbs) and I was having problems like "running out of gas" during a work out, feeling quezy during a workout. Stuff like that.

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    - Oh yeah. Learn how to cook. I'm not talking about becoming the next Mario Batali. I just mean competency in the kitchen. Why? The world is full of places ready to overload your daily intake. Did you know that a single cheeseburger with fries from Ruby Tuesday's exceeds the total daily recommended intake for an average woman? It's fucking crazy out there. Instead, cook at home, and do it often.

    Another piece to this is: If you go out, bring a friend! Decide on a single entree and split it. This saves calories and money. If you can't agree on one single thing, and order two, both of you should be sure to only eat half of it and take the rest home for a second meal at a later date (or if you're in Europe, just throw it against the wall because they don't have take home boxes).

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • RandomEngyRandomEngy Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Commit to a routine, and just do it. Easy times to fit it in are before/after work or meals. That way you don't need to pry yourself away from something to do it. You can also try adding in entertaining stuff to do during your workout. Most weekdays I will spend 45 minutes (2 TV slots) watching shows and working out. You could also find interesting or entertaining podcasts instead. What this does for me is it makes exercise a natural part of my day to experience rather than something to convince myself to do.

    Profile -> Signature Settings -> Hide signatures always. Then you don't have to read this worthless text anymore.
  • bluefoxicybluefoxicy Registered User
    edited February 2010
    Teyar wrote: »
    My fellow whateverans! What sort of habits / life alterations / methods / ideas have you found effective for getting the hell off the couch in a long term, meaningful way?

    I have a morning routine that I try to follow. It gets me going in the morning.
    • Wake up at given time
    • Shower and shave in the morning in half an hour total (I take my shaves slow and very deliberately, I'm using a straight razor)
    • Cook breakfast consisting of eggs and whatever else, some starch source has to be in there, in 15 minutes.
    • Consume breakfast within another 15 minutes.
    • 15 minutes of Wii Fit Plus. Attempt to get in some brief aerobics and get my upper/lower body moving, also some stretching i.e. yoga
    • Go to work

    Basically, the shower gets me clean and my blood flowing; the shave is just because I prefer to shave after showering, but it has trained me to shave fast and accurately.

    Breakfast includes eggs, starch, and a glass of Ovaltine in whole milk. Just a barrage of vitamins and minerals and macronutrients (proteins, starches, fats) that I need.

    The aerobics in the morning get my body moving. I might do Advanced Step and Rhythm Boxing; and Triangle, Warrior, or Tree pose in Yoga. I might take just a 3 minute Rhythm Boxing session and a short Hula Hoop session to pack in Bird's Eye Bull's Eye or Rhythm Kung Fu, or sometimes Rhythm Parade, just to get my body moving.

    It's notable that a straight 15 minute session of Rhythm Boxing and i.e. Hula Hoop will get my body a decent calorie burn, which lasts a little while and kicks my digestion system in to process the food I just ate. Cutting that back and starting with lighter things brings the time down, making this much less significant; but that's of no importance.

    If you care that much, you can do another 15 minutes of solid Aerobics when you get home; followed by some resistance training. I tend to push myself through the Push-Up, Jackknife, and Plank challenges M/W/F and the aerobics and lighter such on the other days.

    You can also add a hobby such as guitar or piano; or cycling; or whatnot to get you moving. It's better to be playing drums or guitar and have your mind and body engaged than it is to be sitting on your ass all the time; both of these are a bit more complex than just sitting around playing video games, even though they're not a far stretch from just operating something in your hands. If you want to get out with your bike, go do so. You could also take up Autocrossing, but that takes a huge time dedication (it will stress your abs, too).

    You could also try to get one of those things. What's it called... a girlfriend, I think. If you have sex regularly you'll be more active than if you're just jacking off to porn a lot. Dating's only worthwhile if you find a girl you actually like though; be honest, if you're just in it for the sex then you might have a more meaningful relationship as friends with benefits, since you'll still have your common ground and you won't be hiding behind an illusion just to get laid (yeah, constantly lying to a girl about your motives kind of destroys your ability to have a meaningful relationship with her). This works for me, except my FWB seems significantly less interested in non-sexual social content than I am :( But I have a couple others that are more meaningful so it's okay.

    Really being "Sedentary" isn't about sitting on your ass all the time; it's about sitting on your ass non-stop doing just about nothing. Wasting hours in front of the PC, only to walk to the couch and play Final Fantasy. It's dulling and unhealthy to the mind. If you have a few hobbies, you'll be inclined to do something different from time to time, walk to this side of the room and sit instead of that, go out somewhere with friends who you can talk to about your hobbies.

    It sounds to me that you're unsatisfied with your life because you've learned to spend it doing nothing; start doing things, either getting you directly outside and moving (cycling, social clubs, martial arts) or giving yourself more things to retreat towards when you're alone (musical instruments, cooking as a hobby, learn to drive a stick shift and make your morning drive to work more satisfying...). If I spent 100% of my free time playing guitar, I would feel like a bigger loser than I already am and probably not go out much.

    People call me Wood Man, 'cause I always got wood.
  • HamurabiHamurabi Cambridge, MARegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Carbs are just bad, period. Don't cut them out entirely, but sure as hell restrict them.

    Is this advice specifically for someone who isn't in shape? Because I don't see how anyone could call carbs "bad" when not consumed in excess. They're an essential part of the macronutrient tripod.

  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    It's good advice for anybody. The so-called modern diet emphasizes them waaay too much, and is almost certainly directly responsible for the diabetes and obesity epidimics in countries that have adopted the American-style diet .

  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    wallaka wrote: »
    It's good advice for anybody. The so-called modern diet emphasizes them waaay too much, and is almost certainly directly responsible for the diabetes and obesity epidimics in Westernized countries.

    Or high fructose corn syrup and a shit load of other dietary issues.

    sig.jpg
  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    HFCS is a symptom of cost-cutting and the low-fat, high-carb craze of the 70's.

  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    wallaka wrote: »
    HFCS is a symptom of cost-cutting and the low-fat, high-carb craze of the 70's.

    HFCS is a symptom of ridiculous farm subsidies. Where are you getting all this?

  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    wallaka wrote: »
    HFCS is a symptom of cost-cutting and the low-fat, high-carb craze of the 70's.

    HFCS is a symptom of ridiculous farm subsidies. Where are you getting all this?

    Yeah, seriously.

    sig.jpg
  • SosSos Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Carbs are just bad, period. Don't cut them out entirely, but sure as hell restrict them.

    Is this advice specifically for someone who isn't in shape? Because I don't see how anyone could call carbs "bad" when not consumed in excess. They're an essential part of the macronutrient tripod.

    Carbs, specifically complex carbs, are wonderful for people working out. Runners could not function without carbs. Body builders need them to a lesser extent.

    I could not quite explain the "carbs are bad" mentality for dietters. Where else are you going to get your calories? Fat? Hell no. Protein? Well maybe, but most sources of protein are relatively high in fat/calories and that really limits your food choice. Vegetables are made of mostly carbs and fiber. Are you going to tell people not to eat vegetables because they have carbs?

    Dietters just need a calorie deficit. I found this easiest with foods high in fiber (which mimics the full feeling without the calories). Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, legumes. Excluding nuts, all of these foods are mostly carbs.

    As a fatty I cooked all of my food for months, cut out soda, and resisted most processed food. That slashed my calorie intake and what I ate turned out to be great for me in other ways.

  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Sos wrote: »
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Carbs are just bad, period. Don't cut them out entirely, but sure as hell restrict them.

    Is this advice specifically for someone who isn't in shape? Because I don't see how anyone could call carbs "bad" when not consumed in excess. They're an essential part of the macronutrient tripod.

    Carbs, specifically complex carbs, are wonderful for people working out. Runners could not function without carbs. Body builders need them to a lesser extent.

    I could not quite explain the "carbs are bad" mentality for dietters. Where else are you going to get your calories? Fat? Hell no. Protein? Well maybe, but most sources of protein are relatively high in fat/calories and that really limits your food choice. Vegetables are made of mostly carbs and fiber. Are you going to tell people not to eat vegetables because they have carbs?

    Dietters just need a calorie deficit. I found this easiest with foods high in fiber (which mimics the full feeling without the calories). Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, legumes. Excluding nuts, all of these foods are mostly carbs.

    As a fatty I cooked all of my food for months, cut out soda, and resisted most processed food. That slashed my calorie intake and what I ate turned out to be great for me in other ways.

    Ever since I started eating more whole wheat and white meat, I find it much easier to get full with less food.

  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    wallaka wrote: »
    HFCS is a symptom of cost-cutting and the low-fat, high-carb craze of the 70's.

    HFCS is a symptom of ridiculous farm subsidies. Where are you getting all this?

    Subsidies make it cheap, thus cost-cutting. It was added to things that don't need sugar because then manufacturers can say it's low-fat, and the product still tastes decent. Even though it's actually less healthy than before.

  • SosSos Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    Sos wrote: »
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Carbs are just bad, period. Don't cut them out entirely, but sure as hell restrict them.

    Is this advice specifically for someone who isn't in shape? Because I don't see how anyone could call carbs "bad" when not consumed in excess. They're an essential part of the macronutrient tripod.

    Carbs, specifically complex carbs, are wonderful for people working out. Runners could not function without carbs. Body builders need them to a lesser extent.

    I could not quite explain the "carbs are bad" mentality for dietters. Where else are you going to get your calories? Fat? Hell no. Protein? Well maybe, but most sources of protein are relatively high in fat/calories and that really limits your food choice. Vegetables are made of mostly carbs and fiber. Are you going to tell people not to eat vegetables because they have carbs?

    Dietters just need a calorie deficit. I found this easiest with foods high in fiber (which mimics the full feeling without the calories). Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, legumes. Excluding nuts, all of these foods are mostly carbs.

    As a fatty I cooked all of my food for months, cut out soda, and resisted most processed food. That slashed my calorie intake and what I ate turned out to be great for me in other ways.

    Ever since I started eating more whole wheat and white meat, I find it much easier to get full with less food.

    Without even going into the psychology of portion size and presentation this is a great approach to feeling full with less. I had forgotten about white meat having relatively low fat compared to other protein sources.

  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    What if you hate meeting people? Or, more generally applicable, since I realize I'm probably not the norm in my hatred of meeting people, what if you live somewhere you're not comfortable walking around?

    Really, my big problem is that I'm tired. I get up at 4:30am-ish, catch a bus at 5:30, get to work at 7, sit on my ass all day taking phone calls and answering e-mails, catch another bus at 4pm, get home around 5:30-5:45 (depending on traffic), eat dinner with the fam, crash on the couch exhausted until I go to bed, usually around 10. I do what I can, like I try to get out and walk a few blocks on my lunch hour, and generally take the stairs over the elevator (there's 150 steps in and out of the Bus Tunnel when I have to switch buses each morning, then I work on the second floor), but by and large, my job is sedentary, and I'm beat by the time I get home.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Rogue Coral Springs, FLRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    This is going to sound crazy, but I've always kept active using one of these:

    ITG2.jpg

    Or something close to it. It's challenging, fun, and best of all, most ITGs support custom song lists. If you hate the music on ITG(and odds are you will, most of the in-game stuff sucks), take a flash drive, load it up with stepmania stuff, and go from there.

    As for where to find a cabinet? Bowling alleys, D&Bs, Gameworks, any place like that is bound to have one. It's practically a given.

    fiV9i14.jpg
    蒼く咲く華 日は灯り 天に流れる | Kill The Past
  • CorvusCorvus Winter crow VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Houn wrote: »
    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    What if you hate meeting people? Or, more generally applicable, since I realize I'm probably not the norm in my hatred of meeting people, what if you live somewhere you're not comfortable walking around?

    Really, my big problem is that I'm tired. I get up at 4:30am-ish, catch a bus at 5:30, get to work at 7, sit on my ass all day taking phone calls and answering e-mails, catch another bus at 4pm, get home around 5:30-5:45 (depending on traffic), eat dinner with the fam, crash on the couch exhausted until I go to bed, usually around 10. I do what I can, like I try to get out and walk a few blocks on my lunch hour, and generally take the stairs over the elevator (there's 150 steps in and out of the Bus Tunnel when I have to switch buses each morning, then I work on the second floor), but by and large, my job is sedentary, and I'm beat by the time I get home.

    Is there any reason you can't take your phone calls standing up? Every little bit helps.

  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Corvus wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    What if you hate meeting people? Or, more generally applicable, since I realize I'm probably not the norm in my hatred of meeting people, what if you live somewhere you're not comfortable walking around?

    Really, my big problem is that I'm tired. I get up at 4:30am-ish, catch a bus at 5:30, get to work at 7, sit on my ass all day taking phone calls and answering e-mails, catch another bus at 4pm, get home around 5:30-5:45 (depending on traffic), eat dinner with the fam, crash on the couch exhausted until I go to bed, usually around 10. I do what I can, like I try to get out and walk a few blocks on my lunch hour, and generally take the stairs over the elevator (there's 150 steps in and out of the Bus Tunnel when I have to switch buses each morning, then I work on the second floor), but by and large, my job is sedentary, and I'm beat by the time I get home.

    Is there any reason you can't take your phone calls standing up? Every little bit helps.

    Hard to type standing up with my desk so low. Though I've been known to do it anyway on occasion.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Houn wrote: »
    Corvus wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    What if you hate meeting people? Or, more generally applicable, since I realize I'm probably not the norm in my hatred of meeting people, what if you live somewhere you're not comfortable walking around?

    Really, my big problem is that I'm tired. I get up at 4:30am-ish, catch a bus at 5:30, get to work at 7, sit on my ass all day taking phone calls and answering e-mails, catch another bus at 4pm, get home around 5:30-5:45 (depending on traffic), eat dinner with the fam, crash on the couch exhausted until I go to bed, usually around 10. I do what I can, like I try to get out and walk a few blocks on my lunch hour, and generally take the stairs over the elevator (there's 150 steps in and out of the Bus Tunnel when I have to switch buses each morning, then I work on the second floor), but by and large, my job is sedentary, and I'm beat by the time I get home.

    Is there any reason you can't take your phone calls standing up? Every little bit helps.

    Hard to type standing up with my desk so low. Though I've been known to do it anyway on occasion.

    I know you're tired after work - but that's when you fit in activities. You have the exact same lifestyle as the majority of workers. You really have to make an effort. You need to identify something you CAN do, and just go. I was putting things off because I wanted to really find something"i enjoyed". eventually I realised that it's just an excuse. If you're not doing anything - do something... Who cares if you dont feel like it - take an ipod and get out there.

    I started jogging, which I dont really enjoy - but I felt really good for getting out and doing something. Now I swim, jog, do weights - and will soon join a Martial Art. For me it was that very first step that made it all happen. There must be a gym somewhere around.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fallingman wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    Corvus wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    Even walking is better than nothing. Are you able to just go for a walk? With no real aim in mind, just walk and see what you see. You'll get fresh air, some exercise, depending on area might meet people etc.

    What if you hate meeting people? Or, more generally applicable, since I realize I'm probably not the norm in my hatred of meeting people, what if you live somewhere you're not comfortable walking around?

    Really, my big problem is that I'm tired. I get up at 4:30am-ish, catch a bus at 5:30, get to work at 7, sit on my ass all day taking phone calls and answering e-mails, catch another bus at 4pm, get home around 5:30-5:45 (depending on traffic), eat dinner with the fam, crash on the couch exhausted until I go to bed, usually around 10. I do what I can, like I try to get out and walk a few blocks on my lunch hour, and generally take the stairs over the elevator (there's 150 steps in and out of the Bus Tunnel when I have to switch buses each morning, then I work on the second floor), but by and large, my job is sedentary, and I'm beat by the time I get home.

    Is there any reason you can't take your phone calls standing up? Every little bit helps.

    Hard to type standing up with my desk so low. Though I've been known to do it anyway on occasion.

    I know you're tired after work - but that's when you fit in activities. You have the exact same lifestyle as the majority of workers. You really have to make an effort. You need to identify something you CAN do, and just go. I was putting things off because I wanted to really find something"i enjoyed". eventually I realised that it's just an excuse. If you're not doing anything - do something... Who cares if you dont feel like it - take an ipod and get out there.

    I started jogging, which I dont really enjoy - but I felt really good for getting out and doing something. Now I swim, jog, do weights - and will soon join a Martial Art. For me it was that very first step that made it all happen. There must be a gym somewhere around.

    ...I lost my cardkey for the apartment complex's gym years ago, and haven't coughed up the $100 to get a new one. :oops:

    Plus, I generally hate my neighbors. Side effect of living in a cheaper apartment complex.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I honestly think that's your answer. You really have a gym inside your appartment building?! Get a new card - or borrow someone elses. Put some headphones on and just go once. Dont think about it, walk in the door after work, get changed - and go. Then do it one more time a day later. Then you have a pattern going, and all you have to do is keep it up.

    After two weeks I started to feel guilty about thinking I'd skip it, and then continued to feel really proud of myself after going again - now it's a habit.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fallingman wrote: »
    I honestly think that's your answer. You really have a gym inside your appartment building?! Get a new card - or borrow someone elses. Put some headphones on and just go once. Dont think about it, walk in the door after work, get changed - and go. Then do it one more time a day later. Then you have a pattern going, and all you have to do is keep it up.

    After two weeks I started to feel guilty about thinking I'd skip it, and then continued to feel really proud of myself after going again - now it's a habit.

    It would be more like "after putting the kids to bed, and ditching my wife". Also, not building, complex, but it's not that far a walk. And I'd have to pay the $100, because there's no one to borrow from, because again, I hate my neighbors. Lastly, the largest deterrent is that I hate my neighbors, and if I saw anyone using the gym, I'd probably turn around and leave.

    No, I think I need to just take up a routine of sit-ups before bed or something.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • BioHaz594BioHaz594 Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    A question to those people who moved between cities (and countries)... How did you setup your finances before you moved? Like did you just save your money and then moved, or left with the clothes on your back and the cash in your pocket and build up in the new place? I am curious.

    orgblk_m50le_sig1.png
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