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Your (kids') schools are run by idiots, facsists, and maybe pedophiles.

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Posts

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    enc0re wrote: »
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    I find it interesting how isolated incidents of idiotic restrictions and actions can damn the entire educational system and everyone who is a part of it, when this same logic is applied to no other arena of public life.

    The educational system is the visible authority in the portion of an individual's life when they're starting to dislike authority. There's no way the generalized hatred for educators is completely rational.

    I would say the police are treated much the same around here.
    I would agree somewhat. Then again, they suffer from a lot of the same early association issues that educators do, and they too are easy (potentially easier, in fact) to lump into a faceless mass of non-humanity to be judged based on the actions of individuals, actions that only make the news if they are substantially negative in context, it would seem.

    I mean, it's not surprising that a forum whose population is overwhelmingly dominated by younger males would have a meta-beef against institutional authority figures. It's still somewhat disturbing, though.

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  • Orochi_RockmanOrochi_Rockman __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2010
    I think you're taking this a bit too far. I'm sure no one here believes that every single person that works at a high school in an administrative position in the United States is an absolute moron. There are exceptions to the rule to be certain.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I think you're taking this a bit too far. I'm sure no one here believes that every single person that works at a high school in an administrative position in the United States is an absolute moron. There are exceptions to the rule to be certain.
    Between this and the public school/homeschool thread, and the education funding thread a couple months ago, I don't think I'm really over reacting at all.

    The starting assumption for educators in general and school administration in particular seems that they are at best well-meaning lobotomy cases and more likely jerks that took the job specifically for the chance to ruin childhoods. This isn't my (obviously anecdotal) experience, and it's definitely not the impression I get now that I'm actively researching the educational system. It seems to be purely a construct of youth rebellion baggage and association error when looking at the news.

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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    I think you're taking this a bit too far. I'm sure no one here believes that every single person that works at a high school in an administrative position in the United States is an absolute moron. There are exceptions to the rule to be certain.
    Between this and the public school/homeschool thread, and the education funding thread a couple months ago, I don't think I'm really over reacting at all.

    The starting assumption for educators in general and school administration in particular seems that they are at best well-meaning lobotomy cases and more likely jerks that took the job specifically for the chance to ruin childhoods. This isn't my (obviously anecdotal) experience, and it's definitely not the impression I get now that I'm actively researching the educational system. It seems to be purely a construct of youth rebellion baggage and association error when looking at the news.

    Again, three high schools, three districts, two states.

    One had a policy of pressing charges against all parties involved in any altercation, regardless of any witness statements or circumstances. Somebody walks up and punches you in the face, and you push them away? Assault charge, let the court figure it out. Yeah, it's awesome that an administration would completely avoid at all trying to deal with any events that took place in their school, and instead introduce 15-year-olds to the criminal justice system for defending themselves.

    On a personal note, in another school I ran into a principal who gave me detention for swearing. Why was I swearing? Because, as an eight grader, three juniors (yay 7-12 mixed Jr/Sr high school) were chasing my down the hallway to (at least according to them) kick my ass. Yes, these students were seen chasing me by the same teacher that reported me. But, apparently because they hadn't actually kicked my ass yet they were not his concern. So I get punished, they do not. Awesomesauce.

    And lastly, banning shorts in Phoenix. Gotta love Mormon administrators. Beyond that, same high school wasn't going to let a kid walk at graduation in the ceremony because he was a couple credits short...of course, he was a couple credits short because he had dropped out of school for several semesters to fight cancer. He'd worked his ass off, gone in summer, and he was already scheduled to pick up those last credits the coming summer. No matter. Policy's a policy, says the administration, their hands are tied...no student without X credits can walk in the graduation ceremony (note that nobody was asking them to actually hand him a diploma). Oh, wait, that's not true...doesn't seem to be a problem for foreign exchange students. But oh well.

    That last one led to a riot. Literally. With marching, riot cops blocking streets, the whole nine yards. Apparently it was on CNN.

    So, three out of three.

    I could also write a novella about the terrible, terrible fucktards that ran schools in my wife's district (she was a teacher for five years). Most of that was at the elementary level (she was an elementary teacher) so it doesn't have as obvious an "impact" to most people. However a lot of it probably set kids up for failure from a pretty early age, so maybe it's even worse.

    And that's beyond the "zero tolerance" policies that have become standard across the country. You know what should have "zero tolerance" policies? Actual firearms, and (maybe) actual illicit drugs. Not Midol, not obvious squirt guns. But again, administrators who don't have the balls to do their fucking jobs, so they enact blanket policies that take away the need to.

    And again, this isn't aimed at educators. On that end, abject incompetence or downright malice is the exception, most are decent people who care.
    I would agree somewhat. Then again, they suffer from a lot of the same early association issues that educators do, and they too are easy (potentially easier, in fact) to lump into a faceless mass of non-humanity to be judged based on the actions of individuals, actions that only make the news if they are substantially negative in context, it would seem.

    Ha. Not to turn this into a cop thread, but that's also a well-deserved reputation. And again, aside perhaps from Thanatos, most of us are willing to say that a majority of cops don't commit heinous acts against the citizens they're supposed to protect. Merely that most of them, if/when they see such acts, do nothing to stop it (and, in most cases, work to actively cover it up). That's been shown time and time again. You want to talk about isolated acts of individuals? Serpico is the exception, not the rule. And yeah, I've known tons of cops (being in the Guard), and every last one has personally told me (or me as part of a group) stories of abusing their position. We're talking well over a dozen cops, different departments, different states. Every last one.

    Some occupations have a perception of incompetence or corruption for a reason. And part of the reason they get away with it is because people like you are always willing to jump to their defense. Usually because either A) they are or desire to be in the same profession or B) they have friends or family in the same profession. Well, here's hoping you or those you know are one of the few decent ones, because yes most of us will admit they exist. Odds aren't good, though, so take a long hard look.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I think there's a lot of malice assumed where it's not due, especially when it comes to public officials.

    And I'm not "jumping" to the defense of anyone. If anything, this is something that's been building for years watching people take shots at the education system and everyone involved in it on these forums. People occasionally do stupid things, and far be it from me to defend stupid acts, but the profile associated with any minor fuck up at a school is orders of magnitude higher than it would be in the private sector. Admittedly, there's a reason for that, and people who work in education need to be held to higher standards because of the importance of what they do for our society. My issue really starts when the assumption is that the best case scenario for the people that are in charge of making sure our kids are learning is that they're malice-neutral baboons that are going to ruin lives unintentionally instead of the standard evil mustachioed villains that are actively eroding the rights of our youth.

    That's a fucked up view of the realities of our educational system that I'm not going to condone. Especially given the thousands upon thousands of people in that field that do great jobs every day and are subsequently ignored because of it.

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  • histronichistronic Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Quid wrote: »
    histronic wrote: »
    I feel like the only computer courses that *need* to be taught in high school are computer keyboarding and how to use Excel. Web Design and computer programming are interesting classes as well, but it doesn't matter if you learn them in high school or not as most colleges will require you to take them again anyway. I learned how to use a computer in all of about an hour when I was 10 years old, and while I'm not an idiot, I feel like they are pretty easy to figure out; its definitely not something that needs to be taught in high school.

    It is for a lot of people. And besides, there are lots of classes various students don't need but are mandatory to make sure they do know what the Hell they're doing.

    The thing is, computers are the one thing where help is provided almost every step of the way without needing outside assistance. If I don't understand how to work a car, I'm gonna need someone to show me how. A computer, on the other hand, has help buttons located just about everywhere, and everything is labeled pretty clearly. Hell, there is a "start" button for crying out loud. As long as you go into it *wanting* to learn how to use it, you will be able to. The only people who feel like computers are alien technology are those who don't want to use them but feel like they have to for a job or something.

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  • YarYar Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Zed has a very good point, but he is preaching to the damned.

    All I can say is that the schools are what society made them to be. It sucks that schools have, for example, a policy that says you hand out equal punishment in a fight regardless of what actually happened. But you know what you get when you don't have that? You get stories about how black kids always get thrown in jail if they fight at school, whereas the white kids get off with a summary judgment of "boys will be boys." If you give an administratior the common sense authority to determine whether it was a brawl or one kid trying to defend himself from an aggressor, unfortunately the common sense he has may be fraught with complications and prejudices. And even if it isn't, someone else might claim it is anyway. In the end, in order to get on with your day and actually educate without a lawyer reviewing your every step, you have to take a zero-tolerance approach to situations. Society is fickle and emotional and unforgiving if you don't.

    In this particular case, I think if there is foul play, it will likely be an overzealous or somewhat disturbed IT guy, and not necessarily something indicative of school administrators. It still boggles my mind to believe that an administration would have actually thought it best to covertly and randomly monitor children in their homes.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    histronic wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    histronic wrote: »
    I feel like the only computer courses that *need* to be taught in high school are computer keyboarding and how to use Excel. Web Design and computer programming are interesting classes as well, but it doesn't matter if you learn them in high school or not as most colleges will require you to take them again anyway. I learned how to use a computer in all of about an hour when I was 10 years old, and while I'm not an idiot, I feel like they are pretty easy to figure out; its definitely not something that needs to be taught in high school.

    It is for a lot of people. And besides, there are lots of classes various students don't need but are mandatory to make sure they do know what the Hell they're doing.

    The thing is, computers are the one thing where help is provided almost every step of the way without needing outside assistance. If I don't understand how to work a car, I'm gonna need someone to show me how. A computer, on the other hand, has help buttons located just about everywhere, and everything is labeled pretty clearly. Hell, there is a "start" button for crying out loud. As long as you go into it *wanting* to learn how to use it, you will be able to. The only people who feel like computers are alien technology are those who don't want to use them but feel like they have to for a job or something.
    Even that basic help stuff requires basic computer literacy to be able to understand it's function.

    The laptops thing is something that a lot of schools are going to these days. The push to prepare students for a technology saturated job market is strong enough that it's going to be something that you'll see just about anywhere that can afford it in the next decade or so, assuming some other form of technology integration doesn't upend it. The real problem is that things are changing so fast that the people who are developing the cirricula for schools with computers grew up well before such things were even a possibility, so they don't really have the same instincts regarding it that they would something like direct math instruction. It's trial and error even moreso than almost any other instructional technique, even though the need for it is pretty much universally recognized at this point, and the issues and success rates we're seeing for it are reflecting that.

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  • JihadJesusJihadJesus Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    My mother was a teacher, my wife is a teacher, and I completed a good portion of my undergrad degree taking classes in the educational administration training program. I think the criteria for my initial impression of an administrator is pretty clear: did you spend a substantial ammount of time as a classroom teacher before deciding to move into administration?

    If not, I'll assume you're a self interested prick who doesn't give half a crap about your students or your teachers until you show otherwise.

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  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    JihadJesus wrote: »
    My mother was a teacher, my wife is a teacher, and I completed a good portion of my undergrad degree taking classes in the educational administration training program. I think the criteria for my initial impression of an administrator is pretty clear: did you spend a substantial ammount of time as a classroom teacher before deciding to move into administration?

    If not, I'll assume you're a self interested prick who doesn't give half a crap about your students or your teachers until you show otherwise.

    While I agree that a teaching background is a great asset, I think we need to recognize that the administration skills aren't the same as teaching skills.

    However, in my experience management that has production experience tends to be superior. Whether that's administrators who have taught, or CEOs who have worked on the factory floor.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I think that having teaching experience is a huge asset to any given administrator, but it's hardly an absolute indicator of quality.

    Then again, in the places I'm looking to teach there aren't likely to be any that were hired directly to administrative positions. In fact, I'm probably going to be more qualified on paper than whoever winds up overseeing me. Inner city schools aren't known for their ability to attract highly sought after applicants.

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  • JihadJesusJihadJesus Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I don't know of many people who went STRAIGHT from being in the classroom to being an administrator; generally they had to go back and get some kind of additional training. And I'm not saying any admin who wasn't a teacher is terrible, just that they're not going to get much of a benefit of the doubt initially - they'll have to prove that they're looking out for the good of the school rather than the good of their career prospects before I'll really believe it.

    It's more about initial perception than absolute quality.

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  • BubbaTBubbaT Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Here's a PBS Frontline segment featuring Dan Ackerman, Vice Principal for IS 339 in Bronx, NY talking about how awesome it is to use laptop webcams to spy on and otherwise "mess with" 6th and 7th grade students who "don't realize we are watching."

    http://www.boingboing.net/2010/02/25/school-administrator.html


    KalTorak wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    krush wrote: »
    just hit me...


    what the fuck kinda school district can afford to send laptops home with kids???

    One that's wasting their money. Kids in middle/high school do not need their own laptops in order to be educated.

    Anyone who grows up without a computer is at a disadvantage in later life, at least in this current century.

    I agree.

    However, even if you're committed to get a computer into the hands of every student, why a friggin' Macbook? I love Macs, but it seems like barebones netbooks were made for this sort of thing.

    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

    *Looks at DC school system and beats head against desk*

  • histronichistronic Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Here's a PBS Frontline segment featuring Dan Ackerman, Vice Principal for IS 339 in Bronx, NY talking about how awesome it is to use laptop webcams to spy on and otherwise "mess with" 6th and 7th grade students who "don't realize we are watching."

    http://www.boingboing.net/2010/02/25/school-administrator.html

    That's not nearly the same thing that was going on in PA. Here, the kids themselves are turning the webcams on and the administrators are just viewing what is on their screen. I'm okay with them doing this since its during school and the kids are supposed to be studying and not editing their myspace or facebook pages. But in PA, where they are not just checking out what students have on their screens at home, but also actively turning their webcams on and spying on them is a huge breach of privacy.

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  • HenroidHenroid Nobody Nowhere fastRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Here's a PBS Frontline segment featuring Dan Ackerman, Vice Principal for IS 339 in Bronx, NY talking about how awesome it is to use laptop webcams to spy on and otherwise "mess with" 6th and 7th grade students who "don't realize we are watching."

    http://www.boingboing.net/2010/02/25/school-administrator.html

    Hey dawg, how 'bout some context? Like how this article is about a guy who is talking about monitoring laptop use during school hours and on school grounds (since it's on the school network)?

    This I'm okay with. It's on school grounds, using school property, and the line is rather clear on students doing things they should / shouldn't be doing.

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  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    KalTorak wrote: »
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

    *Looks at DC school system and beats head against desk*

    The fuck do you expect when school funding is tied to property taxes?

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • PantsBPantsB Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Daedalus wrote: »
    KalTorak wrote: »
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

    *Looks at DC school system and beats head against desk*

    The fuck do you expect when school funding is tied to property taxes?

    There are some things that make sense to be funded by property taxes (roads and other infrastructure for instance, fire/emergency services/law enforcement to a certain extent) . Schools are not one of them

    11793-1.png
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  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    PantsB wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    KalTorak wrote: »
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

    *Looks at DC school system and beats head against desk*

    The fuck do you expect when school funding is tied to property taxes?

    There are some things that make sense to be funded by property taxes (roads and other infrastructure for instance, fire/emergency services/law enforcement to a certain extent) . Schools are not one of them
    I agree 100%. Unfortunately, we have enough trouble selling school funding as it is. What happens when you talk about funding someone else's school?

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  • mythagomythago Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Henroid wrote: »
    This I'm okay with. It's on school grounds, using school property, and the line is rather clear on students doing things they should / shouldn't be doing.

    Assuming, of course, that students and their families are fully informed about the monitoring, the rules are clear and the students don't have to use the school laptops. And assuming that the people doing the monitoring aren't dicks. Somebody who brags on national TV that he uses laptop monitors to "mess with" the students is both too stupid and too creepy to be allowed to work at a school.

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  • HenroidHenroid Nobody Nowhere fastRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    mythago wrote: »
    Somebody who brags on national TV that he uses laptop monitors to "mess with" the students is both too stupid and too creepy to be allowed to work at a school.

    I dunno about the creepy part (just because children are involved doesn't mean the pedo flag has to be raised). He's certainly a silly goose for the bragging, but aside from that, what is the hypothetical harm of the monitoring in that specific case?

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  • YarYar Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    I agree 100%. Unfortunately, we have enough trouble selling school funding as it is. What happens when you talk about funding someone else's school?
    No, the real problem is that non-local funding of schools is virtually impossible. Try to tell the rich neighborhood that they can't buy supplies, or fund a special bonus for teachers, or hold fundraisers, etc. Good luck.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Yar wrote: »
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    I agree 100%. Unfortunately, we have enough trouble selling school funding as it is. What happens when you talk about funding someone else's school?
    No, the real problem is that non-local funding of schools is virtually impossible. Try to tell the rich neighborhood that they can't buy supplies, or fund a special bonus for teachers, or hold fundraisers, etc. Good luck.
    Official school funding and financial gifts to schools are two very different animals.

    It's entirely possible to federalize school funding to the degree that there aren't massive disparities in school quality based on the tax bracket of their attendees. There's really no way to standardize having rich benefactors to pay for new computer labs or sporting equipment, though.

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  • HenroidHenroid Nobody Nowhere fastRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Man, if people want to invest in schools on a private medium, more power to them. I mean, I'm sure there's frivilous ways to waste money vs. more useful forms of donation, but something is better than nothing.

    On the other hand though, no school should have to rely on that sort of funding.

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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2010
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    PantsB wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    KalTorak wrote: »
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Lower Merion is one of the richest towns (defined as areas with 20k+ population) in the US. Mean household income is ~$185k, higher than Bethesda, MD or Beverly Hills, CA. Per-student spending in the school district is ~$23k.

    Frankly, it's surprising that they got "just" plain ol' Macbooks and not Pros or Airs or something. A $1000 Macbook (the SD bought 2620 laptops for $2.6 million) is just 4% of spending for a single student in a single year.

    *Looks at DC school system and beats head against desk*

    The fuck do you expect when school funding is tied to property taxes?

    There are some things that make sense to be funded by property taxes (roads and other infrastructure for instance, fire/emergency services/law enforcement to a certain extent) . Schools are not one of them
    I agree 100%. Unfortunately, we have enough trouble selling school funding as it is. What happens when you talk about funding someone else's school?

    There's always busing. MA maintains a program where promising student attend schools in affluent communities and stay with host families during the week. It's not perfect, but it does mean there are schools rich enough to maintain multilevel special needs departments with minimal grumbling.

    Come to think of it, doesn't baseball have some system where well funded franchises send money to the losers?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • PantsBPantsB Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    There's always busing. MA maintains a program where promising student attend schools in affluent communities and stay with host families during the week. It's not perfect, but it does mean there are schools rich enough to maintain multilevel special needs departments with minimal grumbling.

    Come to think of it, doesn't baseball have some system where well funded franchises send money to the losers?

    Busing hasn't exactly led to successful schools. And METCO and the like aren't a solution to bad schools, they're just lifeboats for talented poor minority students to go from bad schools in poor neighborhoods to wealthy suburbs with good schools. A better system would be to not have bad schools

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  • mythagomythago Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Henroid wrote: »

    I dunno about the creepy part (just because children are involved doesn't mean the pedo flag has to be raised). He's certainly a silly goose for the bragging, but aside from that, what is the hypothetical harm of the monitoring in that specific case?

    What specific case? And it doesn't have to be sexual to be creepy.

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  • NovidNovid Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Looks like the Lower Marion Cops were in it too:

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/homepage/20100305_Two_tech_workers_sidelined_in_Web-cam_case.html?viewAll=Y&text=#comments
    Two information-technology employees of the Lower Merion School District have been placed on leave while an investigation continues into the use of remote surveillance software on student laptops.

    The two people authorized to activate the software - Michael Perbix, a network technician, and Carol Cafiero, information systems coordinator - were put on paid leave last week while lawyers and technicians examine how the remote system was used, The Inquirer learned yesterday.

    Lawyers for Cafiero and Perbix said their clients did nothing wrong. Perbix and Cafiero turned on the remote software only when a laptop was reported missing, they said - and administrators knew what they were doing.

    "A phone call had to come from the high school to turn it on," said Charles Mandracchia, attorney for Cafiero. "And if it was turned on, it was turned on with the understanding that the computer was either lost or stolen."

    Perbix's salary this year is $86,379. Cafiero, who supervises 16 technicians and administrative assistants, makes $105,569. Both have been with the Lower Merion district for 12 years, according to spokesman Douglas Young.

    Their lawyers said the use of the software was no secret. On at least two occasions, the district turned over pictures and other information to Lower Merion police so they could help track stolen laptops.

    The district even set up a secure Web site so the police could have access to pictures and other information, according to attorneys in the case.

    "Quite honestly, the police knew about these devices," said Marc Neff, a lawyer representing Perbix. "They were not in the dark about the fact that these computers were being tracked."


    Lower Merion Township Police Superintendent Michael J. McGrath did not return calls seeking comment.

  • SurikoSuriko AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Hate to drag a topic from the dead, but what the fuck?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8602327.stm
    A 12-year-old US schoolgirl is suing the New York City authorities for $1m (£650,000) in damages after she was arrested for writing on her desk.

    Alexa Gonzalez was led out of her school in handcuffs by police after she was caught scribbling a message to her friends with an erasable, green marker.

    Miss Gonzalez and her mother are suing the police and education departments in New York City.

    They are claiming for excessive use of force and violation of her rights.

    Miss Gonzalez was caught scribbling "I love my friends Abby and Faith" on her desk during a Spanish class in February.

    The 12-year-old said her Spanish teacher then "dragged" her to the dean's office where police were called.

    How does one come to the conclusion that the police should be called in over writing, not even engraving, on a desk? o_O

  • QuidQuid The Fifth Horseman Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Clearly they were huffing the marker.

    PSN: allenquid
  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Unless they were stabbing someone with a shiv-marker, no reason the cops should have been involved.

    Old news though, unless the lawsuit is new.

  • HenroidHenroid Nobody Nowhere fastRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    That is excessive for damn sure. As is the one million dollar mark for the lawsuit.

    "Ultima Online Pre-Trammel is the perfect example of why libertarians are full of shit."
    - @Ludious
    PA Lets Play Archive - Twitter - Blog (6/15/14)
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Henroid wrote: »
    That is excessive for damn sure. As is the one million dollar mark for the lawsuit.

    Yeah, $1M in damages is a little absurd.

    I'd love to see several million awarded punitively, though.

  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Eh, you always aim high when you ask for damages - it's like the opening bid when you're haggling.

  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Oh, it gets more fucked up:
    Spoiler:

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Back at district offices, the Robbins motion says, employees with access to the images marveled at the tracking software. It was like a window into "a little LMSD soap opera," a staffer is quoted as saying in an e-mail to Carol Cafiero, the administrator running the program.

    "I know, I love it," she is quoted as having replied.
    When can we draw and quarter these people?

  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
  • HenroidHenroid Nobody Nowhere fastRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Refusing to turn over the computer? Taking bets on child pornography being present!

    "Ultima Online Pre-Trammel is the perfect example of why libertarians are full of shit."
    - @Ludious
    PA Lets Play Archive - Twitter - Blog (6/15/14)
  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I have a feeling this is going to get extremely creepy if they actually bother investigating it like they should.

    As in, even creepier than it already is.

    The craziest and most parodoxical thing, though - despite the fact that we have a sensationalistic media obsessed with pedos, technological fears, and general hysteria regarding teenagers, very few people will hear about this case, and lots of them won't even care about it. Just like the girl who got strip-searched over some Tylenol. They had to take that all the way to the Supreme Court and even then I don't think anyone got fired over it.

  • durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    But wait what if they're just investigating theft hahaha no but seriously: creepy as hell and obviously wrong from the word go.

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