Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Memorizing French Paragraph

FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
edited April 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So I have to memorize a kind of lengthy paragraph for an oral exam, but no matter what I try nothing seems to be working too well. I'm far from being fluent in French, so it's basically turning into memorizing a list of words I'm not familiar with. I tried taking just the verbs of each sentence and trying to make a phrase, but then I can never remember what the rest of the sentence is that goes with it, and it's only worse when I try to do the same thing with the verbs in English. I've also tried learning one sentence at a time and repeating it, then moving to the next one, but I can get as far as maybe 3 sentences (of about 15) before I totally blank or make some crazy error. Is there some method that would make this easier?

I should mention we're allowed to have an outline with us as we present, but it can't be "too detailed" or have more than 10 words in English.

FrostyAlphaWolf on
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
«1

Posts

  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Try recording it and playing it to yourself.

    sig.gif
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    So I have to memorize a kind of lengthy paragraph for an oral exam, but no matter what I try nothing seems to be working too well. I'm far from being fluent in French, so it's basically turning into memorizing a list of words I'm not familiar with. I tried taking just the verbs of each sentence and trying to make a phrase, but then I can never remember what the rest of the sentence is that goes with it, and it's only worse when I try to do the same thing with the verbs in English. I've also tried learning one sentence at a time and repeating it, then moving to the next one, but I can get as far as maybe 3 sentences (of about 15) before I totally blank or make some crazy error. Is there some method that would make this easier?

    I should mention we're allowed to have an outline with us as we present, but it can't be "too detailed" or have more than 10 words in English.

    Was the paragraph presented to you or did you somehow compose it yourself? My last three oral exams, myself and a partner had to put together a dialogue and it always centered around words we knew. Why are there words in there that you don't know? What's the paragraph exactly? I'm curious to see it.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    The paragraph is one me and a partner had to write for a 4-minute conversation, using mostly reflexive verbs and present tense. This is what I'm trying to work with:
    Spoiler:

    It's not so much they're verbs I don't know, it's just that it's so much easier to memorize things when they're in a language I use every day. I'm only in second level French so I'm not really used to creating entire conversations yet. I guess the main problem isn't the verbs themselves, but trying to remember to keep them in agreement with each other and keep it flowing semi-smoothly.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    The paragraph is one me and a partner had to write for a 4-minute conversation, using mostly reflexive verbs and present tense. This is what I'm trying to work with:
    Spoiler:

    It's not so much they're verbs I don't know, it's just that it's so much easier to memorize things when they're in a language I use every day. I'm only in second level French so I'm not really used to creating entire conversations yet. I guess the main problem isn't the verbs themselves, but trying to remember to keep them in agreement with each other and keep it flowing semi-smoothly.

    I'm fairly fluent in french, but I'd have no way of memorizing that past the first few lines - it would probably help if it was written properly? (no offense, obviously) Or would that be cheating?

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Do you have to read exactly what you just wrote? Since all you're doing is recounting your day, it would probably be for the best if you just learned the language well enough to do it off the cuff. Obviously, this won't help if you're stuck with that exact order of events.

    sig.gif
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Yea, I'm aware my French is barely coherent, and these sentences are the most bare-bones basic. We're encouraged to practice/share with other people to try to improve, so any pointers to make it more proper/easier to memorize are more than welcome.

    We don't have to read exactly what we wrote; since we can't even have more than a basic outline, a lot of it will be making it up as I go. The main idea for writing out this section was to get a good idea of what I wanted to say, in the right order, and make sure I understand my subjects, direct objects and whatnot. I was thinking I'll just list the verbs on my outline and refer to that to make sentences as I go along.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Well, yeah, the grammar needs work, but I could easily understand it and I'm only in my third term of college French (never having taken it in high school).

    I don't know, for mine, it's just repetition. Over, and over, and over.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • QuidQuid The Fifth Horseman Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    When I gave a speech in Chinese I wen through it and learned the meaning of each word I didn't know. It helped a lot since rather than just parroting sounds I was saying words I knew the meaning of. Then it just became a matter of repetition and practice.

    Edit: Also yeah, it's definitely comprehensible. I understood the bulk of it and haven't studied French in years.

    PSN: allenquid
  • UsagiUsagi WOMP WOMPRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Are you having problems remembering the vocabulary or the sentence order?

    And yeah, the grammar is rough, but if you're just starting French that's not entirely unexpected and you'll definitely get better with practice. If they're asking you to present something orally it's more likely they'll be evaluating your conversation for accent and speaking skills, so saying this paragraph out loud often is really important.

    Jormungandr? Damn near killed 'er!
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    I'm not going to fix it for you unless you let us know it's not cheating, but here's a rough translation to english of what you wrote:
    Spoiler:
    Any english person would have trouble memorizing that - It would be easier if it were fixed first.

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Usagi wrote: »
    Are you having problems remembering the vocabulary or the sentence order?

    And yeah, the grammar is rough, but if you're just starting French that's not entirely unexpected and you'll definitely get better with practice. If they're asking you to present something orally it's more likely they'll be evaluating your conversation for accent and speaking skills, so saying this paragraph out loud often is really important.

    The ones I've taken, the grammar is what they're really looking at right now. My teacher told me that while they do want a good accent now, that really doesn't come into play grading wise until the 3rd year. Enunciation becomes key then.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    I appreciate all the help so far.

    Like I said, we aren't turning in a hard copy so accents and silent grammar errors don't make much of a difference at this point, it's more about showing we understand what these verbs mean and how to make them agree. I think the main thing she'll be looking for is proper sentence structure and pronunciation.

    It's not cheating to get help on this assignment, the only thing she told us we can't do is add in words or phrases that we don't know, and she may ask us to explain parts as a test. Outside that, we're welcome to try it out with a french-speaker to get opinions on what can be improved. If you think it'll be easier to memorize Apex, I welcome any corrections.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I'd change "facade" to "visage".

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    I'd change "facade" to "visage".

    Haha, I went back and fixed that as soon as I saw it. I keep mixing that up, I guess because facade sounds like face?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    D'habitude, je me reveille à sept heures du matin. Après que je me lève, je prend (this is 'to take' if you're not familiar with it) une douche et je m'habille. Ensuite, Je mange le petit-dejeuner, je me brosse les dents et je me rase. À huit heures, je pars pour l'école. Habituellement, je vais en classe, mais parfois je vais au travail. Après ma première classe, je recontre mon ami pour déjeuner. Apres le déjeuner, je vais en classe à trois heures, puis au travail. À cinq heures, je reviens (to go back to, otherwise use 'vais') à mon appartement. Ensuite, je prepare le dîner pendant que je regarde la télé. Je fais ensuite mes devoirs pendant une heure. Plus tard, je joue a un jeu video avec mon ami; il est toujours très amusant. Avant que je me couche, je me lave le visage. Vers une heure du matin, je vais dormir.

    I tried to keep it intact as much as possible

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    D'habitude, je me reveille à sept heures du matin. Après que je me lève, je prend (this is 'to take' if you're not familiar with it) une douche et je m'habille. Ensuite, Je mange le petit-dejeuner, je me brosse les dents et je me rase. À huit heures, je pars pour l'école. Habituellement, je vais en classe, mais parfois je vais au travail. Après ma première classe, je recontre mon ami pour déjeuner. Apres le déjeuner, je vais en classe à trois heures, puis au travail. À cinq heures, je reviens (to go back to, otherwise use 'vais') à mon appartement. Ensuite, je prepare le dîner pendant que je regarde la télé. Je fais ensuite mes devoirs pendant une heure. Plus tard, je joue a un jeu video avec mon ami; il est toujours très amusant. Avant que je me couche, je me lave le visage. Vers une heure du matin, je vais dormir.

    I tried to keep it intact as much as possible

    When he's talking about playing the video game, should that "a" have an accent grave over it? So that it doesn't look like a form of avoir?

    Also, why all the "Je me"?

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    When he's talking about playing the video game, should that "a" have an accent grave over it? So that it doesn't look like a form of avoir?

    Also, why all the "Je me"?

    Yes, it should have an accent on it. There's a couple more mistakes in there, but as it's an oral presentation it obviously won't matter.

    As for the 'Je me', it's because the verb has no 'target' without it. "je me rase" and "je rase" are equivalent to "I shave myself" and "I shave"

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    When he's talking about playing the video game, should that "a" have an accent grave over it? So that it doesn't look like a form of avoir?

    Also, why all the "Je me"?

    Yes, it should have an accent on it. There's a couple more mistakes in there, but as it's an oral presentation it obviously won't matter.

    As for the 'Je me', it's because the verb has no 'target' without it. "je me rase" and "je rase" are equivalent to "I shave myself" and "I shave"

    I know I'm fairly new to the whole French thing, but does it need a target? Can't the reader just assume by the context?

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    It's a reflexive verb.

    sig.gif
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    When he's talking about playing the video game, should that "a" have an accent grave over it? So that it doesn't look like a form of avoir?

    Also, why all the "Je me"?

    Yes, it should have an accent on it. There's a couple more mistakes in there, but as it's an oral presentation it obviously won't matter.

    As for the 'Je me', it's because the verb has no 'target' without it. "je me rase" and "je rase" are equivalent to "I shave myself" and "I shave"

    I know I'm fairly new to the whole French thing, but does it need a target? Can't the reader just assume by the context?

    You'd have to imply the target otherwise:

    Je me brosse les dents et je me rase.

    Becomes

    Je bross mes dents et je rase mon visage.

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    The way Apex has is it the way we were taught about those verbs, so I think that will be better than not having a subject.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    When he's talking about playing the video game, should that "a" have an accent grave over it? So that it doesn't look like a form of avoir?

    Also, why all the "Je me"?

    Yes, it should have an accent on it. There's a couple more mistakes in there, but as it's an oral presentation it obviously won't matter.

    As for the 'Je me', it's because the verb has no 'target' without it. "je me rase" and "je rase" are equivalent to "I shave myself" and "I shave"

    I know I'm fairly new to the whole French thing, but does it need a target? Can't the reader just assume by the context?

    You'd have to imply the target otherwise:

    Je me brosse les dents et je me rase.

    Becomes

    Je bross mes dents et je rase mon visage.

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    French is a bitch to learn, but I love it.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    If this was a one-time retelling of what happened, yes. But this sounds like a 'tell us what happens for you on an average day' kind of assignment, in which case you would use the present. French verb tenses are a goddamn nightmare anyway, so stick to the present! =D

    "Je me brossait les dents" btw, Esh.

    I'd love to be the one disappoint you when I don't fall down
  • FiziksFiziks Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Sounds like you really don't need to memorize so much as you just need to recite a passage using reflexive verbs. I'd more worry about learning some basic phrases such as brush my teeth, eat breakfast, shower, etc. That way you can just kinda throw them out in some kinda coherent order.

    Cvcwu.jpg
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    You're at least half right Esh...

    Thanks for all the help guys, hopefully I can get some kind of system down for this thing. I've already come to terms that it'll be an embarrassing failure, but as long as I get it done I'm happy.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    If this was a one-time retelling of what happened, yes. But this sounds like a 'tell us what happens for you on an average day' kind of assignment, in which case you would use the present. French verb tenses are a goddamn nightmare anyway, so stick to the present! =D

    "Je me brossait les dents" btw, Esh.

    My bad, but it's brossais. Brossait is the il/elle/on form.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • UsagiUsagi WOMP WOMPRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Frosty, you said you could have an outline - maybe do a list in order of the conjugated verbs as a prompt?

    Like

    -me reveille
    -me leve
    -prend
    -m'habille
    -etc

    so all you have to do is study your verb vocab and fill in a sentence around them

    Jormungandr? Damn near killed 'er!
  • FrostyAlphaWolfFrostyAlphaWolf Registered User
    edited April 2010
    That may be exactly what I do. She didn't go into specifics about how much detail we could put in, just "not too detailed" so I hope I can get by with having just the verb and pronoun. That way I can kind of build sentences as I go along instead of trying to memorize word for word what was written up.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • UsagiUsagi WOMP WOMPRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Sounds like a plan, but practice a bunch of times by yourself and also a bunch of times in front of other people - you'd be surprised how much it'll help settle your nerves. Good luck with the exam and the learning of your vocab!

    Jormungandr? Damn near killed 'er!
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    If this was a one-time retelling of what happened, yes. But this sounds like a 'tell us what happens for you on an average day' kind of assignment, in which case you would use the present. French verb tenses are a goddamn nightmare anyway, so stick to the present! =D

    "Je me brossait les dents" btw, Esh.

    My bad, but it's brossais. Brossait is the il/elle/on form.

    I'm pretty sure it's "brossait" much like, despite it being super confusing for native English speakers to grasp, "tu me manques" means "I miss you."

    sig.gif
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »

    Thinking about it, wouldn't he want to use the imparfait when doing a narrative like this? J'etais bres mes dents?

    Normally yea, but the assignment was to specifically use present tense. We had a choice between present, imparfait, and passe-compose, and we decided present would be the easiest.

    If this was a one-time retelling of what happened, yes. But this sounds like a 'tell us what happens for you on an average day' kind of assignment, in which case you would use the present. French verb tenses are a goddamn nightmare anyway, so stick to the present! =D

    "Je me brossait les dents" btw, Esh.

    My bad, but it's brossais. Brossait is the il/elle/on form.

    I'm pretty sure it's "brossait" much like, despite it being super confusing for native English speakers to grasp, "tu me manques" means "I miss you."

    No, the conjugation for il/elle/on is brossait. Brossais is Je and Tu. I'm staring at my French textbook.

    Also, here.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    sig.gif
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    I guess I haven't gotten that far yet. Can you explain? Is it because he's say "Je me" that switches that way?

    EDIT: Funnily enough, next week we're learning about this. I don't really see anything about changing the conjugation though.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    I guess I haven't gotten that far yet. Can you explain? Is it because he's say "Je me" that switches that way?

    EDIT: Funnily enough, next week we're learning about this. I don't really see anything about changing the conjugation though.

    I will be the first to admit that I'm terrible at writing French, so it's very possible that I'm wrong.

    But, the way that reflexive verbs work (which is exactly what the "je me" bit is all about) if I remember correctly is that it's almost as if you are configuring the pronoun in terms of a third person singular verb. I usually try to keep it straight in my head with the example that I gave earlier - "tu me manques" means "I miss you." Notice that "manques" gets the second person (tu) conjugation. Reflexive verbs are kinda weird because we don't have a solid English cognate for thinking about them, much like it takes us a while to realize that "je mange" can mean "I eat," "I do eat," and "I am eating" depending on the context.

    sig.gif
  • UsagiUsagi WOMP WOMPRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Nope, it still has to agree with the pronoun and regular conjugation rules apply: je me lave, je me laverais

    Jormungandr? Damn near killed 'er!
  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    I guess I haven't gotten that far yet. Can you explain? Is it because he's say "Je me" that switches that way?

    EDIT: Funnily enough, next week we're learning about this. I don't really see anything about changing the conjugation though.

    I will be the first to admit that I'm terrible at writing French, so it's very possible that I'm wrong.

    But, the way that reflexive verbs work (which is exactly what the "je me" bit is all about) if I remember correctly is that it's almost as if you are configuring the pronoun in terms of a third person singular verb. I usually try to keep it straight in my head with the example that I gave earlier - "tu me manques" means "I miss you." Notice that "manques" gets the second person (tu) conjugation. Reflexive verbs are kinda weird because we don't have a solid English cognate for thinking about them, much like it takes us a while to realize that "je mange" can mean "I eat," "I do eat," and "I am eating" depending on the context.

    "You I miss". It is a weird way to look at things. Like saying "Nous le lui donnons" --> "We give it to them". We just learned how to speak succinctly and the order of the nouns.

    I understand Manquer being conjugated that way, because it's referencing Tu.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • RaekreuRaekreu Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    I guess I haven't gotten that far yet. Can you explain? Is it because he's say "Je me" that switches that way?

    EDIT: Funnily enough, next week we're learning about this. I don't really see anything about changing the conjugation though.

    I will be the first to admit that I'm terrible at writing French, so it's very possible that I'm wrong.

    But, the way that reflexive verbs work (which is exactly what the "je me" bit is all about) if I remember correctly is that it's almost as if you are configuring the pronoun in terms of a third person singular verb. I usually try to keep it straight in my head with the example that I gave earlier - "tu me manques" means "I miss you." Notice that "manques" gets the second person (tu) conjugation. Reflexive verbs are kinda weird because we don't have a solid English cognate for thinking about them, much like it takes us a while to realize that "je mange" can mean "I eat," "I do eat," and "I am eating" depending on the context.

    "You I miss". It is a weird way to look at things. Like saying "Nous le lui donnons" --> "We give it to them". We just learned how to speak succinctly and the order of the nouns.

    I understand Manquer being conjugated that way, because it's referencing Tu.

    Succinct is good for passing tests but if you actually want to speak French then you'll have to work on word play. When I took French I was good with pronouncing words and mimicking the accent. So good that my professor wanted to fast track me into AP level classes the following year. The only negative thing she had to say was that using quick and accurate language with no embellishment made me sound like I was always talking to a police officer or lawyer.

    As for the memorization, the only thing I can tell you is to practice your ass off. The trick that helped me was to literally play around with the language. As in work out how to explain what you are doing, what you did, or what you plan to do later. Once I thought I had it worked out I would check the textbook or ask some of our foreign exchange students if what I'd come up with made sense. It's also a good way to learn new verbs, especially if you're doing something that can't be explained away with 'je fait______'. Once it becomes natural, you can just rattle it off the same as if you were speaking English. It just takes a while.

  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Raekreu wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    Right, but I'm pretty sure it's technically a third person singular conjugation since it's reflexive.

    I guess I haven't gotten that far yet. Can you explain? Is it because he's say "Je me" that switches that way?

    EDIT: Funnily enough, next week we're learning about this. I don't really see anything about changing the conjugation though.

    I will be the first to admit that I'm terrible at writing French, so it's very possible that I'm wrong.

    But, the way that reflexive verbs work (which is exactly what the "je me" bit is all about) if I remember correctly is that it's almost as if you are configuring the pronoun in terms of a third person singular verb. I usually try to keep it straight in my head with the example that I gave earlier - "tu me manques" means "I miss you." Notice that "manques" gets the second person (tu) conjugation. Reflexive verbs are kinda weird because we don't have a solid English cognate for thinking about them, much like it takes us a while to realize that "je mange" can mean "I eat," "I do eat," and "I am eating" depending on the context.

    "You I miss". It is a weird way to look at things. Like saying "Nous le lui donnons" --> "We give it to them". We just learned how to speak succinctly and the order of the nouns.

    I understand Manquer being conjugated that way, because it's referencing Tu.

    Succinct is good for passing tests but if you actually want to speak French then you'll have to work on word play. When I took French I was good with pronouncing words and mimicking the accent. So good that my professor wanted to fast track me into AP level classes the following year. The only negative thing she had to say was that using quick and accurate language with no embellishment made me sound like I was always talking to a police officer or lawyer.

    As for the memorization, the only thing I can tell you is to practice your ass off. The trick that helped me was to literally play around with the language. As in work out how to explain what you are doing, what you did, or what you plan to do later. Once I thought I had it worked out I would check the textbook or ask some of our foreign exchange students if what I'd come up with made sense. It's also a good way to learn new verbs, especially if you're doing something that can't be explained away with 'je fait______'. Once it becomes natural, you can just rattle it off the same as if you were speaking English. It just takes a while.

    Oh good. Because I hate speaking succinctly. I understand it and have no problem with it, but it's just...meh.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.