Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Gulf Coast Oil]: Spill, Baby Spill. Volunteer Info at the top of OP

DrakeDrake Blow it all upForeverRegistered User regular
edited May 2010 in Debate and/or Discourse
Volunteer Info

http://www.oilspillvolunteers.com/ Seems to have stopped taking applications for volunteers. The website may continue to serve as a good resource, though.

The Alabama Coastal Conservation Association seems to be taking volunteers.

And the Audubon Society looks like they are focusing on the Pascagoula River area in Mississippi.

If anyone has any useful volunteer info, please PM it to me so I may add it here.



NY Times- Size of Spill in Gulf of Mexico Is Larger Than Thought

So yeah, this just keeps getting worse and worse.

Here are some highlights from the article.
NEW ORLEANS — Government officials said late Wednesday night that oil might be leaking from a well in the Gulf of Mexico at a rate five times that suggested by initial estimates.
An explosion and fire on a drilling rig on April 20 left 11 workers missing and presumed dead. The rig sank two days later about 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
“The leaks on the sea floor are being visually gauged from the video feed” from the remote vehicles that have been surveying the riser, said Doug Helton, a fisheries biologist who coordinates oil spill responses for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in an e-mail message Wednesday night. “That takes a practiced eye. Like being able to look at a garden hose and judge how many gallons a minute are being discharged. The surface approach is to measure the area of the slick, the percent cover, and then estimate the thickness based on some rough color codes.”
Wind patterns may push the spill into the coast of Louisiana as soon as Friday night, officials said, prompting consideration of more urgent measures to protect coastal wildlife. Among them were using cannons to scare off birds and employing local shrimpers’ boats as makeshift oil skimmers in the shallows.
On Wednesday evening, cleanup crews began conducting what is called an in-situ burn, a process that consists of corralling concentrated parts of the spill in a 500-foot-long fireproof boom, moving it to another location and burning it. It has been tested effectively on other spills, but weather and ecological concerns can complicate the procedure.

And here's the kicker.
Walter Chapman, director of the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute at Rice University, said a 50 percent burn-off for oil within the booms would be considered a success. Admiral Landry called the burn “one tool in a tool kit” to tackle the spill. Other tactics include: using remote-controlled vehicles to shut off the well at its source on the sea floor, an operation that has so far been unsuccessful; dropping domes over the leaks at the sea floor and routing the oil to the surface to be collected, an operation untested at such depths that would take at least two to four more weeks; and drilling relief wells to stop up the gushing cavity with concrete, mud or other heavy liquid, a solution that is months away.

The array of strategies underscores the unusual nature of the leak. Pipelines have ruptured and tankers have leaked, but a well 5,000 feet below the water’s surface poses new challenges, officials said.

This is pretty horrible stuff. The coastlines of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and the Florida Panhandle are under threat. The Gulf Coast fishing industry is going to get hit hard by this, and if it hits the shore so is the tourist industry that is vital to the Gulf Coast. As a resident of the Gulf Coast, I'm terrified. It just keeps hitting me in waves. All I can think about is that the lives everyone has built here are in jeopardy. The economic fallout is going to hit us on a national level most likely.
Spoiler:
This image in the spoiler was captured on the 27th.

I'm having a hard time remembering the last time I was this scared. This is bad, and I fear it could become a disaster of unprecedented proportions.

UPDATES

image6444653.gif

New Estimate! Possibly 25,000 Barrels a Day!


Gulf oil spill swiftly balloons, could move east

GULF_OIL_SPILL.sff_GFX620_20100501094810.jpg
Drake wrote: »
Here's a report on NOAA's latest worst case scenario.
Sand is an integral part of the formations that hold oil under the Gulf. That sand, carried in the oil as it shoots through the piping, is blamed for the ongoing erosion described by BP.

"The pipe could disintegrate. You've got sand getting into the pipe, it's eroding the pipe all the time, like a sandblaster," said Ron Gouget, a former oil spill response coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

"When the oil is removed normally, it comes out at a controlled rate. You can still have abrasive particles in that. Well, now, at this well, its coming out at fairly high velocity," Gouget continued. "Any erosive grains are abrading the inside of the pipe and all the steel that comes in contact with the liquid. It's essentially sanding away the pipe."

Gouget said the loss of a wellhead is totally unprecedented.

"How bad it could get from that, you will have a tremendous volume of oil that is going to be offgassing on the coast. Depending on how much wind is there, and how those gases build up, that's a significant health concern," he said.
-Mobile Press Register

NOAA Website Devoted to Deepwater Horizon Incident. This reads like a pretty sanitized version of what's going on in the Gulf but there are lots of maps, documents and forecasts in handy pdf format.

450146main1_gulf_tmo_2010121_670.jpg
Image captured on May 1st.

Why is Jeff Childs a massive douchebag, you ask? Read the next two links;
BP official: 'We've significantly cut the flow' of oil from damaged rig

BP says oil flow from Deepwater Horizon remains unchanged, refuting executive
MKR wrote: »
http://twitter.com/Oil_Spill_2010
http://twitter.com/lisapjackson

These were both linked by a site linked on the NOAA site, so I'm guessing the non-verified one is legit.

edit: Also useful: http://www.incidentnews.gov/incident/8220
Grombar wrote: »

Drake on
«13456763

Posts

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    tumblr_l1nhmw7mbP1qz80pso1_500.jpg

    but seriously, people wondered why I am/was so opposed to offshore drilling.

    I feel kind of vindicated: Obama opens the way for more coastal drilling, and now the exact thing I was worried about happening happens.

  • OctoparrotOctoparrot Registered User
    edited April 2010
    the tourist industry that is vital to the Gulf Coast.

    Those fucking douchebags who spend Spring Break in Panama City?

    the GOP shouldn't give a rats ass about them since they won't vote for them. If someone won't vote for you they might as well not exist.
  • DrakeDrake Blow it all up ForeverRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Octoparrot wrote: »
    the tourist industry that is vital to the Gulf Coast.

    Those fucking douchebags who spend Spring Break in Panama City?

    It's a lot bigger than those human turds. Many people come down to the Gulf Coast to just chill on the beach with their family, eat some good local seafood and enjoy the local atmosphere. Spring Break is just the kick-off for what most of us living down here earn our livelihoods from. It's a huge chunk of our local economy. Probably the largest.

  • JihadJesusJihadJesus Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I may be missing something here, but wouldn't it take metric fucktons of oil by orders of magnitude beyond this to effect 'the Gulf Coast' as a whole? I mean it's certainly an ecological disaster, but a region-ruining Old Testament style doomsday scenario for the entirity of American southeast it certainly is not.

    Tired of getting reamed by Gamestop? Sign up for Goozex!
  • DmanDman Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I would totally jury rig a solution.

    take a submarine, rig it to be entirely remote controlled, wedge it onto the the leak and either block the leak or use the sub as a funnel to direct that oil into a pipe.

    the spill is going to be a (multi?) billion dollar disaster anyways, might as well go all out.

  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    JihadJesus wrote: »
    I may be missing something here, but wouldn't it take metric fucktons of oil by orders of magnitude beyond this to effect 'the Gulf Coast' as a whole? I mean it's certainly an ecological disaster, but a region-ruining Old Testament style doomsday scenario for the entirity of American southeast it certainly is not.

    It is still spilling as we speak. And it will most likely continue to spill for weeks, because they haven't found a way to block the leak or turn off the valves.
    The pressure of the oil coming from below might be so great that the valves cannot make an adequate seal.

    vvvv the above quote also answers the below post

    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    You know what horrifies me, that they are detailing how they can't get their robot down there to turn the emergency valve to closed. How on earth is it even possible that this system isn't on a deadman switch? As in, as soon as it stops receiving 'all is safe' signals from topside the thing closes down hard and if it doesn't recieve signals for a week or something it seals the well permanently.

    Furthermore, how come noone let us know that these undersea oil reservoirs are under pressure! I thought they required active pumping (which is why only rocks with high permeability were useful, since only they had a vast interconnected system of oil). I had no concept that once you breached it it was like a popped balloon just waiting to spill oil out everywhere. On land once you breach the well it erupts for a while, but then the flow dies off and you need to pump correct?

    Thirdly, if this sealing dome can be used to close the leak. Why the hell wasn't one already prepared and in position. I mean, there are numerous rigs down there right and you are saying they have no capacity for ONE disaster sealing. Why don't they have a couple of sealing domes standing by?

    Honestly the only hope is that the wind and tides keep this at sea for another week so it starts to harden and to give the coastgaurd more time.

    Hell, I know this seems absurd but couldn't they just tow out a gigantic lump of concrete under a ship and drop it on the opening into the well. I guess I don't know enough about the operation of these rigs. I'm sure this 'dynamic pocket' must be a rarity in drilling, it can't be that any failure of any rig would cause this.

    Don't they have those Drillships? Couldn't one of those move into position and drill 'upriver' from the leak. Or couldn't they move an empty oil tanker into place, and just put a massive pump on it, suck up the sea water and oil and treat it elsewhere. Any steps we can take now to minimize this spill are vital.

    Your puny weapons are useless against me
  • MeshaKMeshaK Registered User
    edited April 2010
    I too live on the Gulf Coast. I work at a casino in Mississippi, and I watched the Coast Guard and some volunteer boaters putting out foam barriers in the Mississippi Sound channel. I saw the news, and I saw the papers, but it didn't hit me until today that this thing could actually reach over here and bitch-slap our economy to the point of declaring the biggest federal emergency since Hurricane Katrina. Make no mistake about it--this is bad for us.

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    tbloxham wrote: »

    Furthermore, how come noone let us know that these undersea oil reservoirs are under pressure! I thought they required active pumping (which is why only rocks with high permeability were useful, since only they had a vast interconnected system of oil). I had no concept that once you breached it it was like a popped balloon just waiting to spill oil out everywhere. On land once you breach the well it erupts for a while, but then the flow dies off and you need to cap correct?

    Not to be rude- but consider this: The oil is in the earth's crust under tons of seawater. Poke a hole and not only will the pressure squeeze the oil out, water will rush into the new hold. Add to the fact that oil and water are immiscible and suddenly you have a leak that just won't stop.

  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • PotatoNinjaPotatoNinja Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.

    Two goats enter, one car leaves
  • AegisAegis Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    So wait, this is a leak of an undersea oil pipeline/well? I thought this was some ship/rig that sank and still had oil in it that was just spilling out due to a hole in it from the sinking.

    Christ this is even more horrifying.

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.

    Oh totally

    get them drills fired up

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Aegis wrote: »
    So wait, this is a leak of an undersea oil pipeline/well? I thought this was some ship/rig that sank and still had oil in it that was just spilling out due to a hole in it from the sinking.

    Christ this is even more horrifying.

    Oil rig caught on fire and sank, so it's a well. There are actually at least 3 leaks collectively pumping out, I believe, 5000 barrels of oil a day.

    camo_sig2.png
  • OctoparrotOctoparrot Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    tbloxham wrote: »

    Furthermore, how come noone let us know that these undersea oil reservoirs are under pressure! I thought they required active pumping (which is why only rocks with high permeability were useful, since only they had a vast interconnected system of oil). I had no concept that once you breached it it was like a popped balloon just waiting to spill oil out everywhere. On land once you breach the well it erupts for a while, but then the flow dies off and you need to cap correct?

    Not to be rude- but consider this: The oil is in the earth's crust under tons of seawater. Poke a hole and not only will the pressure squeeze the oil out, water will rush into the new hold. Add to the fact that oil and water are immiscible and suddenly you have a leak that just won't stop.

    Crude is also less dense than water, so they replace each other readily from surface/"oil hole".

    the GOP shouldn't give a rats ass about them since they won't vote for them. If someone won't vote for you they might as well not exist.
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    tbloxham wrote: »

    Furthermore, how come noone let us know that these undersea oil reservoirs are under pressure! I thought they required active pumping (which is why only rocks with high permeability were useful, since only they had a vast interconnected system of oil). I had no concept that once you breached it it was like a popped balloon just waiting to spill oil out everywhere. On land once you breach the well it erupts for a while, but then the flow dies off and you need to cap correct?

    Not to be rude- but consider this: The oil is in the earth's crust under tons of seawater. Poke a hole and not only will the pressure squeeze the oil out, water will rush into the new hold. Add to the fact that oil and water are immiscible and suddenly you have a leak that just won't stop.

    Well that makes sense, and is an even stronger argument for the deadmans switch. It would seem that this leak is effectively unblock-able then unless the pipe can be closed. The only option is to get a new well into position and start collecting the oil.

    Your puny weapons are useless against me
  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    This is just the free market at work. The free market didn't want us drilling on that spot, it wanted us drilling in a different spot so in order to move us somewhere else it had to cause an oil spill. This is just how the free market works, how dare you question the free market! Drill, baby, drill!

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    And when they do happen they are disasters of epic proportions

    I think I would rather invest the money spent collecting and dealing with this in some other energy source, personally

  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Tell me this is a joke.

    Please.

    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • MeshaKMeshaK Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Kinda like planes being statistically safer than car rides, huh?

  • KetherialKetherial Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    this scares the shit out of me.

    isnt there some way we can collect it, evaporate the water content and then sell it for great profit?

    obviously not, i guess.

    as if we havent been fucked hard enough these past few years.

  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    MeshaK wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Kinda like planes being statistically safer than car rides, huh?

    Clearly the solution is to let every fly their own planes everywhere.

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    The financial hit to the nation's oil industry is, frankly, the least of my concerns

    The danger (both economically and environmentally) to the coastal states the slick threatens is much more distressing to me than the fact that BP takes a hit in the pocket book, even if it gets passed down to consumers.

    Because maybe you know we shouldn't have an entire nation that is so completely dependent on this one fucking resource

  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Now that I realize that the wells are effectively time bombs waiting to destroy vast areas of the coastline and that the rigs are built without the most basic of safety features present then there needs to be an utter halt on development until a 100% effective deadman switch can be installed, and then multiple backups each using a different method also installed.

    I was reading the excuses from BP that 'Oh, the cut off switch probably hit a stronger area of pipe' or ' the valves have jammed on each other'. It should be impossible for the system to fail. Like on a modern nuclear plant. If it becomes supercritical, the fuel rods just fall out of the core, and then the cooling water dumps itself onto the core automatically under gravity.

    Your puny weapons are useless against me
  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    And when they do happen they are disasters of epic proportions
    I think I would rather invest the money spent collecting and dealing with this in some other energy source, personally
    Not really. A few certainly are, but most are pretty minor. The oil industry has tons of incentives to keep oil from spilling. Putting aside the bad PR and the legal problems, 5000 barrels a day at the current price of $85/barrel is about $425,000 in lost revenue, plus the costs associated with cleanup.

    The oil industry hates spills as much as environmentalists do.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    The financial hit to the nation's oil industry is, frankly, the least of my concerns

    The danger (both economically and environmentally) to the coastal states the slick threatens is much more distressing to me than the fact that BP takes a hit in the pocket book, even if it gets passed down to consumers.

    Because maybe you know we shouldn't have an entire nation that is so completely dependent on this one fucking resource

    it will get passed down to consumers in more ways than just increased prices at the gas pump

    i hope you're aware of that

    i mean, last time gas prices jumped above 90 bucks per gallon there was chaos

    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Arch wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    And when they do happen they are disasters of epic proportions
    I think I would rather invest the money spent collecting and dealing with this in some other energy source, personally
    Not really. A few certainly are, but most are pretty minor. The oil industry has tons of incentives to keep oil from spilling. Putting aside the bad PR and the legal problems, 5000 barrels a day at the current price of $85/barrel is about $425,000 in lost revenue, plus the costs associated with cleanup.

    The oil industry hates spills as much as environmentalists do.

    yes the poor poor oil companies

  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    tbloxham wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Now that I realize that the wells are effectively time bombs waiting to destroy vast areas of the coastline and that the rigs are built without the most basic of safety features present then there needs to be an utter halt on development until a 100% effective deadman switch can be installed, and then multiple backups each using a different method also installed.

    I was reading the excuses from BP that 'Oh, the cut off switch probably hit a stronger area of pipe' or ' the valves have jammed on each other'. It should be impossible for the system to fail. Like on a modern nuclear plant. If it becomes supercritical, the fuel rods just fall out of the core, and then the cooling water dumps itself onto the core automatically under gravity.

    but then that takes away from the oil companies profits!!!! SOCIALIST!!!!!!!!!!!

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    The financial hit to the nation's oil industry is, frankly, the least of my concerns

    The danger (both economically and environmentally) to the coastal states the slick threatens is much more distressing to me than the fact that BP takes a hit in the pocket book, even if it gets passed down to consumers.

    Because maybe you know we shouldn't have an entire nation that is so completely dependent on this one fucking resource

    it will get passed down to consumers in more ways than just increased prices at the gas pump

    i hope you're aware of that

    i mean, last time gas prices jumped above 90 bucks per gallon there was chaos

    I do entirely understand that, and frankly I would not mind that. We seriously are wayyyy to dependent on this stuff

  • MeshaKMeshaK Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    The financial hit to the nation's oil industry is, frankly, the least of my concerns

    The danger (both economically and environmentally) to the coastal states the slick threatens is much more distressing to me than the fact that BP takes a hit in the pocket book, even if it gets passed down to consumers.

    Because maybe you know we shouldn't have an entire nation that is so completely dependent on this one fucking resource

    True that. When I get off work I guess I should go buy some rubber boots and gloves for the ritual cleaning of the oil-covered wildlife, huh? Except for the nutria rats. Those fuckers can rot in hell.

  • PotatoNinjaPotatoNinja Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Well accidents like this are rare so obviously we're ok! Kind of like how car crashes are statistically rare so seatbelts are stupid.

    DRILL BABY DRILL.

    Two goats enter, one car leaves
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Arch wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    And when they do happen they are disasters of epic proportions
    I think I would rather invest the money spent collecting and dealing with this in some other energy source, personally
    Not really. A few certainly are, but most are pretty minor. The oil industry has tons of incentives to keep oil from spilling. Putting aside the bad PR and the legal problems, 5000 barrels a day at the current price of $85/barrel is about $425,000 in lost revenue, plus the costs associated with cleanup.

    The oil industry hates spills as much as environmentalists do.

    Not quite as simple as that. It takes money to transport and process that oil. The actual net income it generates is a lot less.

    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    And to the eventual comments- Yes I am fully aware of the oil crises we have had in our past. We didn't learn 30 years ago that we need to move off of such a dependence on oil and I can only hope we learn it sometime.

  • Jademonkey79Jademonkey79 Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    We're pretty much bracing for our local ecosystem to get its ass royally kicked. Yesterday you could smell a lot of it in the air, so it's probably just a matter of time before the tides bring it this way. It's honestly going to break my heart when the oil covered animals start showing up.

    "We’re surrounded. That simplifies our problem of getting to these people and killing them."
  • MeshaKMeshaK Registered User
    edited April 2010
    Arch wrote: »
    And to the eventual comments- Yes I am fully aware of the oil crises we have had in our past. We didn't learn 30 years ago that we need to move off of such a dependence on oil and I can only hope we learn it sometime.

    Not gonna happen. For some reason, NASCAR is too popular. Until you see Jimmy Stewart doing the Daytona 25 in an electric car, oil will be the ultimate in entertainment for rednecks.

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    We're pretty much bracing for our local ecosystem to get its ass royally kicked. Yesterday you could smell a lot of it in the air, so it's probably just a matter of time before the tides bring it this way. It's honestly going to break my heart when the oil covered animals start showing up.

    And this is why I hate offshore drilling. I would honestly rather drill alaska then in the ocean because accidents are much less damaging.

  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Well accidents like this are rare so obviously we're ok! Kind of like how car crashes are statistically rare so seatbelts are stupid.

    DRILL BABY DRILL.
    People on this thread are demanding an end to offshore drilling. Using you car analogy, that's like saying we should ban all cars because some people die in auto accidents.

    No one is calling for an end to "seat belts" (i.e., safety measures on oil rigs). If this spill highlights a safety problem, it should be addressed.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • ArchArch HELLO YES THIS IS BUG Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Well accidents like this are rare so obviously we're ok! Kind of like how car crashes are statistically rare so seatbelts are stupid.

    DRILL BABY DRILL.
    People on this thread are demanding an end to offshore drilling. Using you car analogy, that's like saying we should ban all cars because some people die in auto accidents.

    No one is calling for an end to "seat belts" (i.e., safety measures on oil rigs). If this spill highlights a safety problem, it should be addressed.

    I have been calling for an end to drilling for a long time because I was concerned that this exact scenario would happen.

    Also that analogy is terribad.

  • PotatoNinjaPotatoNinja Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Offshore drilling is entirely safe and we should open the Alaskan Wildlife Reserves for oil exploration.
    Considering how much of it goes on, offshore drilling is pretty damn safe. Accidents like this are really rare. And, yes, we should open up more of Alaska for drilling.

    Well accidents like this are rare so obviously we're ok! Kind of like how car crashes are statistically rare so seatbelts are stupid.

    DRILL BABY DRILL.
    People on this thread are demanding an end to offshore drilling. Using you car analogy, that's like saying we should ban all cars because some people die in auto accidents.

    No one is calling for an end to "seat belts" (i.e., safety measures on oil rigs). If this spill highlights a safety problem, it should be MANDATED BY LAW THAT ALL OFFSHORE DRILLING RIGS FOLLOW STRICT SAFETY PROCEDURE TO THE LETTER CAPABLE OF PREVENTING DISASTERS SUCH AS THIS AT MULTIPLE BREAK POINTS AND IN HAZARDOUS CIRCUMSTANCES, WITH BI-MONTHLY INSPECTIONS PAID FOR BY TAXES ON THE OIL COMPANIES WITH FINES FOR VIOLATIONS STARTING AT MILLIONS AND ENDING AT "YOU ARE NO LONGER ALLOWED TO DRILL ANYWHERE EVER."

    Oh hey there fixed that for you. "Addressing" safety concerns after an entire ecosystem is completely humped seems kind of... well, slow? Late? Insufficient? I don't think anyone in the thread has called for an end to all offshore drilling, but if you find somebody who has please let me know. *edit* aside from Arch, good timing sugar :p

    Tragic but poignant timing. "Offshore drilling is safe, drill baby drill!" and our gulf is destroyed. What's next, someone makes fun of "volcano monitoring" and..., well, that would just be silly.

    Two goats enter, one car leaves
  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    MeshaK wrote: »
    Arch wrote: »
    The financial hit to the nation's oil industry is, frankly, the least of my concerns

    The danger (both economically and environmentally) to the coastal states the slick threatens is much more distressing to me than the fact that BP takes a hit in the pocket book, even if it gets passed down to consumers.

    Because maybe you know we shouldn't have an entire nation that is so completely dependent on this one fucking resource

    True that. When I get off work I guess I should go buy some rubber boots and gloves for the ritual cleaning of the oil-covered wildlife, huh? Except for the nutria rats. Those fuckers can rot in hell.

    But they are full of delicious meat. How can you hate them?

    etxvv5.jpg
«13456763
This discussion has been closed.