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Officers telling soldiers WW3 is coming?

MindLibMindLib Registered User regular
edited May 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
A friend of mine was just going through basic training. He is a candidate for special ops, and he may become a ranger.

Anyway, he just finished basic training, and he is going into active duty, withing a couple months, though he's not sure where. He told me that his superiors have been saying that we're on the cusp of WW3, all the way down through his training. I asked him if that is just something they say to make a soldier prepared for...whatever. He said he had no idea.

Can anyone say whether or not this is common, maybe just used as a way to psych up a soldier before going into duty? Is fucking (EDIT: more?) war about to break out? Possibly with China or N Korea?

MindLib on
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Posts

  • The SpecialistThe Specialist Happy Face Happy PlaceRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    When I went through basic training it was all about killing Bin Laden. I don't ever recall anyone saying anything about WW3.

    But really, when is war not about to break out?

    Edit: I don't have any experience with Special Forces though, so I can't really say anything about their training.

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    Origin Handle - OminousBulge
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  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Tube's Favorite Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's more a matter of giving basic trainees a reason to stop fucking around, feeling sorry for themselves, or to grow up. I mean, if world war 3 does break out, I'd call it a coincidence more than any reliable intel.

  • GothicLargoGothicLargo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    China and America are coming to a point where SOMETHING will have to happen.

    See China has social problems. They have a lot of bachelors. About 40 million of them. Having that large of a gender imbalance in society creates crime issues and the best way to get rid of bachelors is to have a war. Simultaneously, China has exported substantial quantities of wealth to America by being the biggest importer of our debt.

    We're approaching a point where Washington might simply refuse to pay any of the Federal debt that was sold to China. Which would eliminate a lot of our debt interest issues.

    atfc.jpg
  • JordanthehuttJordanthehutt Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Sounds like they are just motivating the troops. No one wants to go die in a war that has really lost its purpose (Iran mostly, and Afghanistan to some extent). People have been talking about WW3 since 1946, I wouldn't expect such a conflict to arrise.

  • L Ron HowardL Ron Howard Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    "I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones."

    -Einstein


    I think it's mostly motivation, that they're trying to get the recruits and trainees to think there's a larger reason why they're doing what they're doing, and pretty much everything else Metalborne said.

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    NNID - bejamus | ESO - (at)guinneapig
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    China and America are coming to a point where SOMETHING will have to happen.

    Could happen, doesn't *have* to happen. No indication that it *will* happen - the two superpowers are careful to remain cordial at this present time. A war would ruin them both, possibly destroy civilisation and gain them nothing.

    Scaremongering. Pure and simple. And that goes for the OP too.

  • MindLibMindLib Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yeah I think I agree with you guys. It has to be a motivational thing. The scary thing is that he seemed pretty muddled about the message, which I can understand. He went into the military for a career, I fear for the stability of my friend, you know?

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    MindLib wrote: »
    He went into the military for a career, I fear for the stability of my friend, you know?

    It's irresponsible for them to tell him that. Give him a bit of logic. If WW3 was coming, the new recruits in the army would be the last to know. Perhaps they meant he should be always be ready for WW3. After all, wars can start with no warning.

  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2010
    China and America are coming to a point where SOMETHING will have to happen.

    See China has social problems. They have a lot of bachelors. About 40 million of them. Having that large of a gender imbalance in society creates crime issues and the best way to get rid of bachelors is to have a war. Simultaneously, China has exported substantial quantities of wealth to America by being the biggest importer of our debt.

    We're approaching a point where Washington might simply refuse to pay any of the Federal debt that was sold to China. Which would eliminate a lot of our debt interest issues.

    More likely: China makes a grab for something that really pisses off the US, the US puffs its chest by moving in a fleet, and China dumps a bunch of US treasury bonds onto the market at 80 cents on the dollar.

    It's cheaper than fighting a war and just as crippling to a nation, heh.

  • billwillbillwill Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Things are much more...complex than they were in the early 1900s.

    China can't exist without America and America can't exist (at least how it does right now) without China. So until either finds a suitable substitute, which is looking more and more unlikely, nothing will happen.

    I hate you and you hate me.
  • FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I think that this is a way to psych up their recruits, and part of the whole psychology behind it. You cant convince people to risk their lives if they don't believe in the cause. So right from the get-go you start telling them how essential their role is.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • MrMonroeMrMonroe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Doc wrote: »
    China and America are coming to a point where SOMETHING will have to happen.

    See China has social problems. They have a lot of bachelors. About 40 million of them. Having that large of a gender imbalance in society creates crime issues and the best way to get rid of bachelors is to have a war. Simultaneously, China has exported substantial quantities of wealth to America by being the biggest importer of our debt.

    We're approaching a point where Washington might simply refuse to pay any of the Federal debt that was sold to China. Which would eliminate a lot of our debt interest issues.

    More likely: China makes a grab for something that really pisses off the US, the US puffs its chest by moving in a fleet, and China dumps a bunch of US treasury bonds onto the market at 80 cents on the dollar.

    It's cheaper than fighting a war and just as crippling to a nation, heh.

    except this completely ignores the reasons why China has been buying the bonds

    if they sell at 80 cents on the dollar, (actually they'd be selling in Yuans) not only do they have to write off billions of dollars, their currency value skyrockets and within five years the entire driving force of their economy collapses because the end-stage manufacturing moves out and their export economy shrivels up and dies

    we can't simply refuse to pay China, for political and constitutional reasons, and there's no way China is starting a war to kill off its bachelors

    the simple truth is that China isn't a threat to us in the near future

    the scary truth is that we've been on the brink of starting WWIII for about sixty years

    the soviets may be "gone" but the missiles aren't

    the officers are technically correct, but I'm sure it's just a motivational strategy

  • LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Some paranoid, "Obama is the socialist devil" types like to panic about "World War III"; it's possible the officer is one of those.

  • RoyceSraphimRoyceSraphim Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    You mean fighting 3 low yield wars on opposite ends of the planet isn't WW3? How terrifying.
    billwill wrote: »
    Things are much more...complex than they were in the early 1900s.

    China can't exist without America and America can't exist (at least how it does right now) without China. So until either finds a suitable substitute, which is looking more and more unlikely, nothing will happen.

  • PeccaviPeccavi oh... oh my!Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The Golden Arches Theory makes it very unlikely that a world war will break out. Economic Interdependence and all that.

    kvhn.png
  • Metal Gear Solid 2 DemoMetal Gear Solid 2 Demo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Exactly, globalism has changed things in the past 50 years. It's in no superpower's interest to goto war with another superpower.

    Spoiler:
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I can appreciate OP's worries.

    Before I left to go home for my mandatory enlistment, I remember a lot of people--political geeks, news-followers, well-informed people basically--were convinced that China was a fifth of tequila and a threatening phone call away from crossing the strait and invading Taiwan.

    The strange part was, these were people that, otherwise, seemed to make up the most politically educated and informed part of the population. The more news they read and educated they seemed on topics, the more convinced they were about it.

    I thought this was strange, because I have family on both sides of the strait, and they thought that was a load of shit. For the same reasons that war between the US and the PRC is unlikely--the incredible level of economic interdependence, and shared interests. China already owns a large portion of Taiwanese industry legally. And China is Taiwan's third biggest trade partner, just barely behind the United States (first is Japan). All this stuff was common knowledge.

    So, when I went before the review board and eventually reported to my barracks for training, I found out that the situation wasn't nearly as bleak. Officers, as usual, warned that we (the conscripts) had a sacred duty to defend the state, that when the fighting broke out, we could not rely on the United States, blah blah blah. In reality, the main cause of all this fear seems to be because the current president, Chen, had apparently been yelling nonstop to the US that China was going to invade. And apparently, no one in our country bothered to correct him, or if they did, no one in American listened. He was lying, and is in jail for the rest of his life now, along with his wife, for unrelated reasons.

    The 14 months I spent there (thankfully short compared to other conscription-based military forces) pretty much convinced me that if anyone was going to start a war, it was the officers, and they weren't going to do it because, frankly, we (the conscripts) would kill them. Literally kill them. Probably in their sleep. I don't know how it was on the other side of the strait, but I never heard anything to suggest otherwise. Missile tests and purchasing Patriot systems and things like that are, in my opinion, part of that pointless smokescreen for people like Chen. Right now, everything I've seemed seems to suggest relations are better than at any point since the Civil War.

    But, that's just me. War didn't break out on my watch anyway. This is one flashpoint that I'm pretty sure isn't going to happen.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • PirateJonPirateJon Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Spoiler:

    all perfectionists are mediocre in their own eyes
  • Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Captain East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    When they start handing out battle plans to recruits, you've got way more important things to worry about (like how to live) than a war across the planet.

    No, regardless of what bull your friend is being told, his bosses don't know that WW3 is around the corner any more than you or I.

    When Russia invaded Georgia about 2 years ago, a bunch of my squadron commanders (I was at an AF school) were talking about massive global war. Some people took it as fact, which is probably what your friend is doing.



  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    PirateJon wrote: »
    Spoiler:
    Spoiler:

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    MindLib wrote: »
    Yeah I think I agree with you guys. It has to be a motivational thing. The scary thing is that he seemed pretty muddled about the message, which I can understand. He went into the military for a career, I fear for the stability of my friend, you know?

    I guess you could call it motivational. Having been through boot camp, The formula is very simple. First you need a scary man to point at. We used the U.S.S.R. for a long time, then Bin Laden (i always thought going from a nuclear superpower to an old guy in a cave as the national boogieman was hilarious) and now they use whatever they can. Second, through careful physical and mental...abuse... you destroy your trainee's psyche, but not completely. Then you condition him with whatever you want.

    They say as much in training. I was told a zillion times that I'd be "Broken down" then they would "Build me back up" It sounds pretty terrible, and it is. But what you are asking the kids (and they are kids) to do is pretty terrible. And you need them to do it without hesitation.

    So, yeah, fear for the stability of your friend, but unless you are right there with him constantly to offset some of this, then all you can really do is be there for him when he comes back. Some people aren't as effected as others, most do pretty OK, depending on what they see or do.

    You can argue about the necessity of military action, or whether the training is overkill or whatever, it won't change (Soldiers chanting along with their DS What make's the grass grow? Blood Blood Blood). The personal cost can be huge.



    Now im gonna go play BF BC2.

  • EriosErios Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Guys, I hate to say it, but WW3:

    A) Arguably already happened, it was boring but made for some great spy movies.

    B) Could start as a regional struggle between India and Pakistan with China getting involved, but it seems unlikely, since China would rather try and act as the third man and moderate, given its commitment to its own security. Conversely, an attempt to nab Taipei may end very, very badly, but even Chinese analysis seems to indicate such a confrontation would be disastrous.

    C) Would likely happen between the Russians and the Americans. NATO, as it stands, is pushing up farther against Russia's door and Russia takes its security very seriously. Furthermore, no credible directive exists to actually defend most NATO states. Russia has reneged on most of its unilateral decisions and treaty-approaches set up by Bush I and Clinton due to George W. Bush's desire for a more adaptable and effective ICBM. Social Scientists with a darker view of human nature may note that, given the distinct lack of underground WMD storage facilities in third world, desert countries, a good number of the bunker-busting ICBMs proposed by GWB's administration were likely designed to disable and destroy Russian mountain command centers (maybe Chinese too!). These would be no small affair, as the payload of the weapon would need to be in the range of megatons, ground bursted (ahoy fallout). The Russians have disarmed a great deal, but could rearm in a short period of time. Combined with an early-warning system, a possible launch-on-first warning or even a first-use policy and a payload of missiles, Russia could easily rain down death and fire on any city. To make matters difficult, any missile launched at Russia from certain vectors would alert China, who could see the missiles as flying for them. This could lead to a conventional escalation.


    I'm not sure what kinds of scenarios you guys dream up, but a conflict between China and the USA would be a thoroughly one-sided affair if it came to total war. If the US truly abandons no-first-use, which it has made no comment on taking back up, then China could be a smoking crater due to a first-strike of air bursted ICBMs. The PRC doesn't keep its missiles' warheads and delivery platforms in the same facilities. Despite some movements by the Obama administration to disarm, the capacity to rearm to late or even middle Cold War levels certainly has not been infringed (intentionally, I might argue). The USA's air power and naval power alone would do enormous levels of damage to the PRC's fighting capability if the war ever became conventional. And let's face it, a multi-million man army isn't particularly useful when you can't actually deploy it against your adversary.

    Also, to clear up a misused term, China is decidedly not a superpower, unless you are couching your international political terms in purely economic language. I'm an econ guy, so that's fine by me, but it ignores several critical variables. As it stands, the world is still unipolar, with the USA as that pole. China's economy is large, but I and perhaps other more cynical voices, see structural weaknesses in its economy, which is compounded by its relatively low productivity or GDP per capita. To further increase my cynicism, I posit the Chinese army has a more domestic function than an international one. China can dictate policy as well as any other member of the UN security council and it certainly has a large GDP. However, China is not a monolithic entity. It has its own competing internal interests, just like the USA or the EU. Realistically, the only thing close to a superpower besides the USA is the EU.


    EDIT: And GothicLargo, wars are a terrible way to kill off your own people. Unless you're on the receiving end. Plague works much better, and it generates international sympathy (occasionally war).

    Steam: erios23, Live: Coconut Flavor, Origin: erios2386.
  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I agree with above. I think the main thing to notice about Chinese military power is that it's not easily projectable. That's the whole point behind U.S. military power, and what makes our forces so much more useful. Highly mobile, with major support. We aren't just landing men, we have the capability to have all the trimmings along for the ride. No other military currently in existence has that power.

    So that leaves China invading a neighboring country or launching nukes. China, historically, is not a country that is likely to invade another country. They are not lacking in natural resources, there are some pretty serious natural barriers around their lands that make moving a ground army difficult. Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

  • GothicLargoGothicLargo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    They have not.

    I can see China invading North Korea if Kim dies and his successor threatens to be worse. And they still hate Japan as much as the Irish hate the English (or perhaps like the Muslims hate the Israelis).

    atfc.jpg
  • EriosErios Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I agree with above. I think the main thing to notice about Chinese military power is that it's not easily projectable. That's the whole point behind U.S. military power, and what makes our forces so much more useful. Highly mobile, with major support. We aren't just landing men, we have the capability to have all the trimmings along for the ride. No other military currently in existence has that power.

    So that leaves China invading a neighboring country or launching nukes. China, historically, is not a country that is likely to invade another country. They are not lacking in natural resources, there are some pretty serious natural barriers around their lands that make moving a ground army difficult. Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    Plus, China has seen some of the bloodiest wars in history in the past few generations, including at least 2 serious civil conflicts. Throw in the Great Leap Forward and you can easily see why the country would be more concerned with avoiding conflict and staying secure than projecting force and inviting even more conflict. And to repeat it, a large, regionalized standing army with little capacity to project force has some...interesting domestic implications.

    Plus, it's not like their acquisition of US treasury bonds has any necessarily sinister implications.

    EDIT: A brushfire escalation over a diplomatic fuckup with Japan is feasible, though a bit unlikely. Though if they invaded NK, I can imagine scenarios in which peace is fostered and others where international cooperation is damaged by the action (if Chinese and US forces came to blows over such a thing).

    Steam: erios23, Live: Coconut Flavor, Origin: erios2386.
  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    They have not.

    I can see China invading North Korea if Kim dies and his successor threatens to be worse. And they still hate Japan as much as the Irish hate the English.

    Yea, but of all the big country to country nasty histories, Japan and China are riding the top. At least as bad as Irish/English.

  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Erios wrote: »
    I agree with above. I think the main thing to notice about Chinese military power is that it's not easily projectable. That's the whole point behind U.S. military power, and what makes our forces so much more useful. Highly mobile, with major support. We aren't just landing men, we have the capability to have all the trimmings along for the ride. No other military currently in existence has that power.

    So that leaves China invading a neighboring country or launching nukes. China, historically, is not a country that is likely to invade another country. They are not lacking in natural resources, there are some pretty serious natural barriers around their lands that make moving a ground army difficult. Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    Plus, China has seen some of the bloodiest wars in history in the past few generations, including at least 2 serious civil conflicts. Throw in the Great Leap Forward and you can easily see why the country would be more concerned with avoiding conflict and staying secure than projecting force and inviting even more conflict. And to repeat it, a large, regionalized standing army with little capacity to project force has some...interesting domestic implications.

    Plus, it's not like their acquisition of US treasury bonds has any necessarily sinister implications.

    I would not call it sinister, it's not like they came and forced us to sell them the bonds. We needed the money to fund the Cold War Machine, they were all too happy to oblige.

    But yea, China is perhaps more likely to collapse horribly than to start a world war.

  • EriosErios Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    They have not.

    I can see China invading North Korea if Kim dies and his successor threatens to be worse. And they still hate Japan as much as the Irish hate the English.

    Yea, but of all the big country to country nasty histories, Japan and China are riding the top. At least as bad as Irish/English.

    Ten times worse. In addition to more recent and gruesome atrocities, Japan often flat-out denies any action other than mutual bonding over croquet and lawn darts with mimosas in hand between 1936 and 1945 with respect to China.

    Steam: erios23, Live: Coconut Flavor, Origin: erios2386.
  • GothicLargoGothicLargo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yea, but of all the big country to country nasty histories, Japan and China are riding the top. At least as bad as Irish/English.

    You can say that again.

    A lot of people don't realize exactly how much Japan and China really hate each other. This is Muslim-Israeli, Khan-vs-Kirk grade mutual genocidal wrath.

    In the second world war, Germany butchered perhaps ten to twelve million civilians and captured Russians in their madness. Japan topped that. The high estimates say the Japanese conquerors of China put sixteen million civilians to death, on top of the millions of soldiers who died in the fighting.

    They are two countries that simply hate each other and will continue hating each other until one or both cease to exist.

    atfc.jpg
  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Erios wrote: »
    Really, (not that I'm an expert on chinese military action) im pretty sure the only real conflicts they have been involved in were Korea, Vietnam, WWII. I could see them taking Taiwan, for instance. I believe China has never given up their claim on Taiwan.

    They have not.

    I can see China invading North Korea if Kim dies and his successor threatens to be worse. And they still hate Japan as much as the Irish hate the English.

    Yea, but of all the big country to country nasty histories, Japan and China are riding the top. At least as bad as Irish/English.

    Ten times worse. In addition to more recent and gruesome atrocities, Japan often flat-out denies any action other than mutual bonding over croquet and lawn darts with mimosas in hand between 1936 and 1945 with respect to China.

    Well, Irish/English has been this kind of low terribleness that lasted for a long, long time. China/Japan had these spikes of utterly horrible events.

    The English are no strangers to crimes against humanity either, Ireland has been a focus for that for a long time, like the last outlet for England's colonial tendancies.



    But, as with all things, the people who lived that stuff are ancient, or dead. All of them will be gone very soon. That's all it really takes to end this sort of enmity, lol, everyone dies off.

  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan Gaderen PSN: GaderenRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I just wanted to say that people were saying before the start of WW1 that complicated financial links would prevent British conflict with Germany.

    OooOOOoOoOOOooOOOoOOOoOoOOoOOoOOOOOOOOoooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooo
  • soxboxsoxbox Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I just wanted to say that people were saying before the start of WW1 that complicated financial links would prevent British conflict with Germany.

    And that logic was correct, and is still correct. Aggression did not start between Germany and Britain - Britain was dragged into the war due to the declaration of war between France and Germany. The same situations exist today.

    The US and China will not start a war with each other, Russia and the US will not, China and Japan will not, etc, etc.

    What IS a possibility is for pretty much anybody to go to war with North Korea, or perhaps an Indian/Pakistani conflict (though I think that's much much much less likely). Perhaps Israel or Iran will do something stupid, but I don't see how either of those would escalate into opposing superpowers.

    Pretty much North Korea is the only country I can think of both powerful and unstable enough to cause a trigger that would get the big boys involved, and that pretty much depends on what happens with Kim Jong-Il kicks the bucket.

    But I think we're really straying into Debate and Discourse territory now - in answer to the original question - it's just an over-enthusiastic officer or a deliberate training technique to instill preparedness.

  • Limp mooseLimp moose Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hi

    I'm an officer in 7th fleet. (That is the one with China, North Korea, and Japan.)

    World War Three is not about to start.

    Any questions?

    Further updates as warrented.

  • psycojesterpsycojester Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Limp moose wrote: »
    Hi

    I'm an officer in 7th fleet. (That is the one with China, North Korea, and Japan.)

    World War Three is not about to start.

    Any questions?

    Further updates as warrented.

    That's because you're not aware of the military's new roots-up intelligence policy, don't worry you'll be informed of the changes in policy by a new recruit shortly:P

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • GothicLargoGothicLargo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    That's because you're not aware of the military's new roots-up intelligence policy, don't worry you'll be informed of the changes in policy by a new recruit shortly:P

    Yes, never trust the leadership with secrets because they're the first people the spies will think to check.

    atfc.jpg
  • PeccaviPeccavi oh... oh my!Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    That's because you're not aware of the military's new roots-up intelligence policy, don't worry you'll be informed of the changes in policy by a new recruit shortly:P

    Yes, never trust the leadership with secrets because they're the first people the spies will think to check.

    I support the new military strategy of hiding information in plain sight

    kvhn.png
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Lost in TranslationRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's basic training.

    They were fucking with them.

    Spoiler:
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    China's economy is based entirely on our economy, and some people are already predicting that China is about to experience a real estate collapse that would make our one in 2006/2007 look tame. Putting them in an even worse position.

    If China went to war with us, not only would they be defeated hilariously easily, it would cripple them for another gajillion years.

    Sounds like some shit officers would say just to get the soldiers riled up. Based on the same ignorance that people employ with all this "omg china will call our debt". No. China will not call our debt. The fact that they own that debt is one of several things that keeps them competitive in the manufacturing economy.

  • Wicked Uncle ErnieWicked Uncle Ernie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's basic training.

    They were fucking with them.

    I think that's a bit wrong... They want their little soldier to truly think WW3 is coming. They want to impress upon them that their every action is needed. And to not comply with whatever they are told is a big no-no. They don't want these recruits to ask how high when they say jump, they want them to just jump. An automatic result when an order is given. This might have had something to do with the amount of trouble i got into during my military service :p

  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Lost in TranslationRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's basic training.

    They were fucking with them.

    I think that's a bit wrong... They want their little soldier to truly think WW3 is coming. They want to impress upon them that their every action is needed. And to not comply with whatever they are told is a big no-no. They don't want these recruits to ask how high when they say jump, they want them to just jump. An automatic result when an order is given. This might have had something to do with the amount of trouble i got into during my military service :p

    I have talked to infantry, field artillery, signal, ordnance, quartermaster, who the hell ever.

    Nobody has had a basic experience like that. Nobody.

    Our drill sergeants let the Combat Lifesaver Class speak for itself.

    Spoiler:
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