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Tales of the Old [Westerns]

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Posts

  • IsidoreIsidore Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Also, I'm just gonna put this in the thread:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6BQKFs3-VM

    I'm going to have to watch this film now. That is an incredible song.

    Thank you Western Thread. You have, implausibly, made me both want to watch a genre I didn't really care about; and made me so, so excited for Red Dead Redemption on friday.

    To imply that those currently at the top - the Warren Buffets and Roman Abramoviches of this world - are the very best, the ne plus ultra of humanity, is a kind of hate speech toward the species. Dignity demands that we refute it.
  • Page-Page- Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    And if we're going to mention No Country For Old Men then The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada should be mentioned as well. Great movie.

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  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Isidore wrote: »
    Also, I'm just gonna put this in the thread:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6BQKFs3-VM

    I'm going to have to watch this film now. That is an incredible song.

    Thank you Western Thread. You have, implausibly, made me both want to watch a genre I didn't really care about; and made me so, so excited for Red Dead Redemption on friday.

    Enrico Morricone did the scores for just about all of Leone's films and the music in all of them is simply brilliant. Even a weaker Leone film like Duck, You Sucker still has an amazing score.

  • A Dabble Of TheloniusA Dabble Of Thelonius Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I grew up on Westerns, some in film format, but mostly in the form of Louis L'Amour novels. I still love em to this day.

    As far as movies go, I know a lot of people hate on it, but I quite enjoyed Open Range.

    The Sackett miniseries based on the L'Amour novels was great as well. Absolute dream cast for the time. Actually any of the made for tv L'Amour stuff is pretty fun.

    So how bout modern westerns? No Country has been mentioned, and I agree. I'll toss this out there. Way of the Gun.

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  • OremLKOremLK Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    As far as movies go, I know a lot of people hate on it, but I quite enjoyed Open Range.

    I like that movie, in large part because it has one of my favorite extended shootout scenes in recent memory. Some parts of the film are pretty cheesy, but it's enjoyable nonetheless.
    Spoiler:

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  • CorbiusCorbius Shepard Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I watched a video comparing Yojimbo, Fistful of Dollars, and Last Man Standing the other day.

    Was interesting, made me want to watch more Kurosawa films.

    wrexsig1.jpg
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I'd also consider No Country For Old Men to be a Western as well, and really enjoyed it.

    I really enjoyed No Country for Old Men, but I don't really consider it to be a Western, per se. No Country for Old Men was essentially a Greek tragic play set in the West. (Why, yes, I am a literature nerd.) It's incredibly true to the tragic conventions and needs, right down to the hubris and Tommy Lee Jones as the Chorus. This is why I think a number people I know who love Westerns did not like this movie. They expected the American Epic that is the classic Western and got a Greek tragedy instead. Personally, I thought it was brilliant.
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    And I checked YouTube's movie section to see what they had up and all I could find is McLintock. It's not one of the great Westerns. It is a rather fun Western that shows the transition from the frontier to society. It has Wayne and Maureen O'Hara who always had a great chemistry.

    McLintock is fun for so many reasons, not in the least because of the homage to The Taming of the Shrew. I mean, John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara? What's not to like? :-P
    I grew up on Westerns, some in film format, but mostly in the form of Louis L'Amour novels. I still love em to this day.

    As far as movies go, I know a lot of people hate on it, but I quite enjoyed Open Range.

    The Sackett miniseries based on the L'Amour novels was great as well. Absolute dream cast for the time. Actually any of the made for tv L'Amour stuff is pretty fun.

    So how bout modern westerns? No Country has been mentioned, and I agree. I'll toss this out there. Way of the Gun.

    You stole my input. haha I thought Open Range was a nicely done Western. Robert Duvall plays such a great cowboy. The movie has quite well used silences as well that worked well.

    I grew up reading and watching Westerns myself. It's hard to beat Louis L'Amour. He had such a sense of the West, both the real West and the idealized West. The Sacketts is good stuff: good story, great cast.

    I know it might seem cliché, but I really like High Noon. It's probably about my favorite.

  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Uee Citizen Record #2051 Über Star CitizenRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yall wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Yall wrote: »
    No mention of "They Call Me Trinity"?

    For shame PA!

    I haven't seen it yet. I don't know the Terrence Hill movies beyond My Name is Nobody.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Call_Me_Trinity

    Fantastic movie. My boss turned me onto Terrence Hill and Bud Spencer stuff a while back.

    Do you have any idea how popular Bud Spencer and Terrence Hill were in Brazil around the 80's?
    We loved those dudes. Trinity was the coolest guy ever.

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  • VariableVariable Ted Hitler Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    want to thank you for the OP, very nicely done.

    edit - I enjoyed the proposition, and while it isn't so recent there is a Depp film called I think Dead Man from maybe 1992 that I believe would or could be considered a western which is quite interesting.

    ah, 1995, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112817/ Jarmusch

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  • YougottawannaYougottawanna Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

  • YougottawannaYougottawanna Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I'm gonna have to watch this good the bad and the weird. I have a thing for Mongolia...

  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

    I understand most of the Spaghetti Westerns were filmed in at a place called Almaria in Andalusia. They even have a small tourist industry built around the old sets! I was going to visit it last year while I was in the region but then I had second thoughts as it seemed a little corny

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

    I understand most of the Spaghetti Westerns were filmed in at a place called Almaria in Andalusia. They even have a small tourist industry built around the old sets! I was going to visit it last year while I was in the region but then I had second thoughts as it seemed a little corny

    See I'd love that.

  • GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    Check out The Proposition for a somewhat recent Australian 'western'.


    Also, if Deadwood gets to be mentioned, Lonesome Dove deserves a shoutout too.

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  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

    I understand most of the Spaghetti Westerns were filmed in at a place called Almaria in Andalusia. They even have a small tourist industry built around the old sets! I was going to visit it last year while I was in the region but then I had second thoughts as it seemed a little corny

    See I'd love that.

    Well perhaps corny was the wrong word. I had a week in the area and I had a lot of other things I wanted to go see that I valued more. The area is full of pre Roman, Roman, Visigoth, Arabic/Muslim and then Medieval sites of interest and I am a bit of a history geek.

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

    I understand most of the Spaghetti Westerns were filmed in at a place called Almaria in Andalusia. They even have a small tourist industry built around the old sets! I was going to visit it last year while I was in the region but then I had second thoughts as it seemed a little corny

    See I'd love that.

    Well perhaps corny was the wrong word. I had a week in the area and I had a lot of other things I wanted to go see that I valued more. The area is full of pre Roman, Roman, Visigoth, Arabic/Muslim and then Medieval sites of interest and I am a bit of a history geek.

    Yes but the film history there...

  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    They've been set all over the place. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid takes place partly in Bolivia. The Ostern is the Soviet equivalent that was made to be the mirror image of the Western for propaganda and is usually set in the steppes of Asia. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is set in Mongolia. Quigly Down Under is set in Australia.

    I understand most of the Spaghetti Westerns were filmed in at a place called Almaria in Andalusia. They even have a small tourist industry built around the old sets! I was going to visit it last year while I was in the region but then I had second thoughts as it seemed a little corny

    See I'd love that.

    Well perhaps corny was the wrong word. I had a week in the area and I had a lot of other things I wanted to go see that I valued more. The area is full of pre Roman, Roman, Visigoth, Arabic/Muslim and then Medieval sites of interest and I am a bit of a history geek.

    Yes but the film history there...

    I was torn! I may have to go back, it is pretty cheap to fly there from London, perhaps under $100 return if I time it right. Then hostels for 3 or 4 nights would be about that as well. Goddam it is cheap to be a tourist in Europe

    This is where I went instead: Granada

    spain.1119050040.granada_alhambra_mountains_xlarge_2x.jpg

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • NumerosNumeros Goodness GraciousRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Variable wrote: »
    want to thank you for the OP, very nicely done.

    edit - I enjoyed the proposition, and while it isn't so recent there is a Depp film called I think Dead Man from maybe 1992 that I believe would or could be considered a western which is quite interesting.

    ah, 1995, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112817/ Jarmusch

    Dead Man is one of the most fantastic movies I've ever seen, but it's definitely not a straight western by any stretch of the imagination. While its external elements are standard western fare, internally, it is so far out of whack Most of the movie is like a disjointed acid dream, albeit an amazingly executed disjointed acid dream. Alfred Molina and Crispin Glover are both totally amazing, not to mention Depp and Gary Farmer.

  • Dox the PIDox the PI Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Grew up watching the awesomness og The Dollars Trilogy
    I watch them every year.

  • XagarathXagarath Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Assassination of Jesse James and El Topo really ought to be in the OP, especially with the role El Topo played in the history of the genre.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Xagarath wrote: »
    Assassination of Jesse James and El Topo really ought to be in the OP, especially with the role El Topo played in the history of the genre.

    I tried to limit the OP to the very influential Westerns. El Topo could be argued onto the list because it basically caused the creation of the Acid Western, but I was tired and I really didn't want to explain it. It also has a history of being damn near impossible to get a hold of. Has a DVD been released for it yet? The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford doesn't make the influential part of the list and it's not really on the required watching list.

  • XagarathXagarath Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Xagarath wrote: »
    Assassination of Jesse James and El Topo really ought to be in the OP, especially with the role El Topo played in the history of the genre.

    I tried to limit the OP to the very influential Westerns. El Topo could be argued onto the list because it basically caused the creation of the Acid Western, but I was tired and I really didn't want to explain it. It also has a history of being damn near impossible to get a hold of. Has a DVD been released for it yet?
    No idea about R1, but it's been out on DVD over here for years. Not hard to come by at all.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Xagarath wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Xagarath wrote: »
    Assassination of Jesse James and El Topo really ought to be in the OP, especially with the role El Topo played in the history of the genre.

    I tried to limit the OP to the very influential Westerns. El Topo could be argued onto the list because it basically caused the creation of the Acid Western, but I was tired and I really didn't want to explain it. It also has a history of being damn near impossible to get a hold of. Has a DVD been released for it yet?
    No idea about R1, but it's been out on DVD over here for years. Not hard to come by at all.

    Apparently there was an official DVD release in 2007. I'll add it to the list a little bit later.

  • CabezoneCabezone Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I thought I'd chime in that Appaloosa is very good.

  • FeralFeral Who needs a medical license when you've got style? Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    My favorite western:
    Spoiler:

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch, man" fallacy.
  • BogartBogart MR. Lady Anime Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Anybody else seen Grim Prairie Tales? Brad Dourif and James Earl Jones swap ghost stories around a campfire in the old west.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Bogart wrote: »
    Anybody else seen Grim Prairie Tales? Brad Dourif and James Earl Jones swap ghost stories around a campfire in the old west.

    I remember seeing it on TV long, long ago.

  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Uee Citizen Record #2051 Über Star CitizenRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hearing about some of these movies set in other countries has me thinking about the various places that a "western" could be set in: Brazil and Argentina both have wide open plains, and there's Australia obviously. I could imagine a "western" set in central asia in the nineteenth century.... the british colonials on one side, russians on the other, locals in the middle...

    Our open plains were completely devoid of people, back then.

    The entire action was going on in the Northeast Semi-Arid regions. There is a lot of hard, thorny low vegetation over there. There were gangs of "Cangaceiros", cangs of men and women armed to the teeth and clad in hard leather, who roamed the countryside like the plague. They were feared and idolized. Most were wiped out by the police, but there are plenty of awesome tales. The biggest and most famous was Lampião ("Oil Lantern").

    There's also the horrid true story of Canudos, a city-theocracy founded by a crazy prophet who railed against the newly formed republic. They were attacked several times by the army, and beat them back. Every single person in Canudos was slaughtered in the end, down to the last man, woman and child. A Brazilian writer/journalist of the time wrote a book about it, after he saw it happen (Os Sertões) and Mario Vargas Llosa also wrote about it.

    All those tales would make great fucking western movies.

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  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Feral wrote: »
    My favorite western:
    Spoiler:

    You know, one of the reasons I fell completely in love with Firefly from the first episode was what a fun Western it was...just set in space.

    Speaking of Australia and Westerns, although it is slightly campy and also slighty cheesy, I always liked Quigley Down Under. A less campy and cheesy Western-in-Australia that I haven't watched in years but did enjoy when I saw it was The Man from Snowy River.

  • A Dabble Of TheloniusA Dabble Of Thelonius Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Return to Snowy River was even better. :) Opening scene at the track, damned near perfect.

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  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Return to Snowy River was even better. :) Opening scene at the track, damned near perfect.

    My dad always says that one is even better, but I'm ashamed to admit I have yet to see it.

  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited May 2010
    In honor of this thread I've moved True Grit to the top of my queue of films to watch next week.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Elki wrote: »
    In honor of this thread I've moved True Grit to the top of my queue of films to watch next week.

    I like True Grit. I don't think it's Wayne's best role or his best Western but it's a fine and solid choice. I'm somewhat annoyed it's being remade. The Cohen brothers are an interesting choice but I'm really not sure how Jeff Daniels is going to do in Wayne's shoes.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    El Topo and The Shootist have been added to my list. Currently on the to do list is:

    Hud
    Hombre
    McCabe and Mrs Miller
    Taxi Driver

  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    to me the entire genre existed to produce the line "fill your hands, yoooouuu sonnuvabitch"

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  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    to me the entire genre existed to produce the line "fill your hands, yoooouuu sonnuvabitch"

    One of the things I love about that scene is something Wayne did in a lot of his movies. That Winchester's lever was modified for his big hands, you'll note that it's almost a circle rather then the long oval of a normal one. The increased size lets him do the twirl with it when he works the lever. It's got almost a sword like feel when he does that.

  • KilroyKilroy Cannonball blastin'Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I think my favorite legacy of the Western is a simple phrase--perhaps one of the best American idioms:

    "Get the hell out of Dodge."

  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    N1tSt4lker wrote: »
    Return to Snowy River was even better. :) Opening scene at the track, damned near perfect.

    My dad always says that one is even better, but I'm ashamed to admit I have yet to see it.

    The Snowy River films were pretty huge back in the day. I really should watch them again, to see if my adult self thinks the child self's tastes were anygood

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  • AtomikaAtomika genius of the restoration Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Hud

    This movie will forever be more important to me for what it didn't do than what it did.
    Spoiler:

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