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#define THREAD_TITLE "PA Programming Thread"

GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
edited October 2010 in Moe's Stupid Technology Tavern
(OP shamelessly stolen from Jasconius)

We are going to do OP by committee! Talk about your favorite languages/frameworks and why they are better than everyone else's.

Algorithms and Data Structures: http://www.itl.nist.gov/div897/sqg/dads/
Jasconius wrote:
Here's what I am working with these days in no important order:

Language: Python
Framework: Django
Purpose: Web Development++


Summary: Django is what PHP contributors wish for in their darkest dreams. Django provides intensely incredible functionality to generate small to medium data driven web applications in minutes. A pretty decent ORM provides a healthy layer of abstraction from database development and allows people who are most comfortable with a traditional scripting environment (read: me) to compete with that 14 year old from Slovenia who got a MySQL book for their birthday. I'm trying to close my first official Django development freelance contract this week.

Python is what it is. A simple, slick programming language with a light syntax and flexible rules that I think is a great language for new programmers. Python does everything including exploring Mars.

Other Links and Reading: http://djangobook.com/ && The Definitive Guide to Django, 2nd Edition

Language: Objective-C
Framework: Cocoa/UIKit
Purpose: iPhone/OS X development


Summary: Obj-C is a thin veneer over ANSI-C enabling OOP and other neat features. Cocoa is the framework upon which all depends when it comes to Mac development, much like Win32 for Windows. My feelings on Cocoa are mixed, the learning curve is steep. I am currently enjoying the tiny bit of abstraction it provides for OpenGL. I am developing an iPhone application for the retail chain I work in-house for, and I just got taken on as a contractor for an iPhone game developer.

Language: Actionscript 3
Framework: Flash
Purpose: Multimedia on the web


Summary: This got me a job, all my jobs really. Flash has evolved in the last decade from an annoying trend to an underground success in the world of RIA's thanks to Flex. ATG, the worlds leading eCommerce engine, just redid their entire commerce administration tool in Flex and I hear great things about it. Traditional Flash (what I do) is in steady decline as non-proprietary web technologies evolve and become mainstream, but with a high dollar creative team, nothing can compare for raw presentation value.

Other reading: GoToAndLearn.com
ASimPerson wrote: »
Language: C
Framework: Aahahahaha
Purpose: My job

Summary: C and its descendants (C++/Java/C#/etc.) are the most popular programming languages in the world. (As co-inventor Dennis Ritchie supposedly said, "C is quirky, flawed, and an enormous success.") The web browser you're using, the OS, most of your applications, most embedded software, the software on your router, the software on your ISP's router, the software on your game console, etc., were all written in C (well, or in C++).

For my job, I write in straight C. No libraries, no frameworks, no C++, no nothin'. C is a programming language for Real Men (tm), which means that there's no memory management and you're free to crash your program in various horrific ways. The trade-off for this is speed and size, attributes which give C its staying power - though proper C is losing favor as an application development language to C++, C#, and the like, it's found a second life in embedded applications and other small devices. I also think there's a certain elegance to the syntax - it's a language from an era when you didn't have a lot of memory, so statements are terse and lack the cruft of some more modern languages (*cough*C++*cough*). And best of all, no right minded C programmer would use LongVariableNamesLikeThis.

There's no shortage of manuals and documentation for the various incarnations of C, but the best reference is still from the source: The C Programming Language, by Kernighan and Ritchie. This book is so ubiquitous and standard that it's known simply as K&R in the field.
Language: Python
Framework: Pygame/PyOpenGL
Purpose: Game Development


Summary: Pygame is an extensive wrapper of the cross-platform SDL frameworks, specifically geared toward game development. Pygame takes care of loading assets, playing back sounds and music, drawing to the screen, handling keyboard and USB gamepad input, and can even capture live images from webcams on most platforms.

Pygame is also aware of PyOpenGL, the OpenGL binding for Python, and will gladly create a window complete with OpenGL context. Add 3 lines of code and suddenly you can make OpenGL drawing calls. No fuss.

Anyone with some knowledge of Python can create a working, playable 2D game demo in under a week. With minimal effort, this game will run on Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux, even the 3D bits, with no problems.

Other Links and Reading: http://www.pygame.org/news.html
Nightslyr wrote: »
Language: PHP
Framework: None (debating between CodeIgniter and Zend Framework)
Purpose: Web Development

PHP is probably the most ubiquitous server-side language around right now, although its been besieged by others on all sides. It's a simple, but bloated language, which suffers from a convoluted past and a stubborn refusal by the devs to trim the fat.

A lot of its popularity stems from how easy it is for newcomers to get results. This low barrier to entry, and PHP's ability to change from script blocks to blocks of HTML on the fly, means that there's a ton of shitty PHP code floating around out there.

Language: JavaScript
Framework: jQuery (looking for one a bit more complex to play with)
Purpose: Web Development

JavaScript is the most widely used programming language on the planet, and one of the most misunderstood. It doesn't behave like other languages, and this difference leads to confusion and frustration. It runs on the client (web browser), and can be turned off. Despite this, it's the driving force behind most of the interactive web apps out there today. Ever use Google Maps or GMail? Yeah, that's JavaScript.

When people talk about JavaScript development today, they tend to mean AJAX, which stands for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. Essentially, this is a programming technique that allows portions of a web page to show new data without a complete page refresh. Again, look at Google's stuff for examples in action.

Language: C#
Framework: .NET 3.5
Purpose: Web Development (although it can be used for other purposes - see: XBOX 360 Indie Games)

C# is a managed OOP programming language. The managed part means that you don't need to worry about memory management (although you can still dabble with pointers and dynamic memory if you want). I like the language a lot, as it stresses readability (at least, more than PHP). When code is written correctly, its very easy to read, and seems almost self-evident. Beyond that, it just works.

GnomeTank on
Sagroth wrote: »
Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
«13456762

Posts

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    (Response to a post from the last thread)
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    bah calling all macros evil is very heavy handed. But that might be because I work with C++ code that uses macros every day for at least:
    • ObjectFactory
    • Object Reference Counting
    • Object Set/Get Macros

    And everyone of those cases could be handled by a template function/class in a much more type-safe, compiler friendly way. Just sayin'.

    Obviously if you work with an existing code base full of macros, then that's life...but if you are writing new code and doing it...for shame.

    The code base was initial written in the early 90's by programmers that had little experience with meta-programming.

    That's completely understandable then...sucks for you, but completely understandable.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I approve of the topical title.

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA check.php?c=OrokosPA
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  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yah, I thought it was good.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's going to cause problems when we define the next thread!

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Jasconius wrote: »
    It's going to cause problems when we define the next thread!

    Yah, we'll have to #undef THREAD_TITLE first, but only if you do an #ifdef check before hand.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I'm happy to say that I've shed the burden of Flash development and am now a full time Objective-C developer. I'm so happy that I'll never have to read another goddamned Adobe blog post again.

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Don't forget an #ifndef so I can do
    gcc -DTHREAD_TITLE=\"THIS IS MY THREAD TITLE NOW\" thread.c

    :P

    maybe nothing else is real
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig~medium.jpgsteam~tinythumb.png
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    (Reply to a post from the last thread)
    End wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    bah calling all macros evil is very heavy handed. But that might be because I work with C++ code that uses macros every day for at least:
    • ObjectFactory
    • Object Reference Counting
    • Object Set/Get Macros

    And everyone of those cases could be handled by a template function/class in a much more type-safe, compiler friendly way. Just sayin'.

    Obviously if you work with an existing code base full of macros, then that's life...but if you are writing new code and doing it...for shame.

    The code base was initial written in the early 90's by programmers that had little experience with meta-programming.

    To be fair, I don't think a lot of that sort of stuff went into C++ before 1994.

    Templates were part of the original C++ standard (86), but compilers didn't fully support them until the early 2000's. Templates have been updated with a lot of things with the C++98 and 03 standards (of the most note would be partial template specialization).

    Pre-2000 it was really hard to use templates though, because as I said, compiler support was shit across platforms.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Jasconius wrote: »
    I'm happy to say that I've shed the burden of Flash development and am now a full time Objective-C developer. I'm so happy that I'll never have to read another goddamned Adobe blog post again.

    While moving from ActionScript to Objective-C is a nice step...you are still left having to program in Objective-C ;)

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    New topic: cyclical dependencies in C: fact of life, or thing to avoid?

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    (Response to a post from the last thread)
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    bah calling all macros evil is very heavy handed. But that might be because I work with C++ code that uses macros every day for at least:
    • ObjectFactory
    • Object Reference Counting
    • Object Set/Get Macros

    And everyone of those cases could be handled by a template function/class in a much more type-safe, compiler friendly way. Just sayin'.

    Obviously if you work with an existing code base full of macros, then that's life...but if you are writing new code and doing it...for shame.

    The code base was initial written in the early 90's by programmers that had little experience with meta-programming.

    That's completely understandable then...sucks for you, but completely understandable.

    I would place macro issues fairly low on the daily annoyance list.

    Jasconius: Fact of life I am finding.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Define cyclic dependencies in C...do you mean in terms of header files? If so, you should avoid it. If it were C++, I would say pre-define...but uhh...not sure what to do about it in raw C...split the common parts in to another header?

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Define cyclic dependencies in C...do you mean in terms of header files? If so, you should avoid it. If it were C++, I would say pre-define...but uhh...not sure what to do about it in raw C...split the common parts in to another header?

    Don't use just place #define guards around the header in C to stop the cycle?

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Define cyclic dependencies in C...do you mean in terms of header files? If so, you should avoid it. If it were C++, I would say pre-define...but uhh...not sure what to do about it in raw C...split the common parts in to another header?

    Don't use just place #define guards around the header in C to stop the cycle?

    Yah, but I think he just means the practice of including two headers inside of each other, regardless of guard placement or not (and I wish more compilers support MS's #pragma once :P would save a ton of guard code).

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Define cyclic dependencies in C...do you mean in terms of header files? If so, you should avoid it. If it were C++, I would say pre-define...but uhh...not sure what to do about it in raw C...split the common parts in to another header?

    Don't use just place #define guards around the header in C to stop the cycle?

    Yah, but I think he just means the practice of including two headers inside of each other, regardless of guard placement or not (and I wish more compilers support MS's #pragma once :P would save a ton of guard code).

    Now I am confused. The guards in each header should stop it from being included more than once since it has been defined already. This than allows any circular nonsense that you want.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Most modern compilers support #pragma once. The only benefit I really ever noticed was that compiler time on large projects went down a few seconds.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Ethea wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Define cyclic dependencies in C...do you mean in terms of header files? If so, you should avoid it. If it were C++, I would say pre-define...but uhh...not sure what to do about it in raw C...split the common parts in to another header?

    Don't use just place #define guards around the header in C to stop the cycle?

    Yah, but I think he just means the practice of including two headers inside of each other, regardless of guard placement or not (and I wish more compilers support MS's #pragma once :P would save a ton of guard code).

    Now I am confused. The guards in each header should stop it from being included more than once since it has been defined already. This than allows any circular nonsense that you want.

    Yah, it does, but the question is: Is the practice of requiring two headers to include each other a good idea, not really can it be done. Would the smarter approach be to split the common parts out somehow. I really don't have an answer, especially since I do C++ and use pre-deceleration which completely defeats the problem.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    Most modern compilers support #pragma once. The only benefit I really ever noticed was that compiler time on large projects went down a few seconds.

    Yah, just saves me key strokes more than anything else. That's the benefit. I wasn't even aware it shaved compile time.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yeah, I mean..

    If I have

    SomeControl.h

    and

    SomeOtherControl.h

    and for whatever reason I need to include them in each other.... this happens a lot in Objective-C I am finding when you have parent/child relationships and need a two-way bridge between the objects... I mean, technically you can not properly cast objects and just call the methods blindly, but this can cause compiler warnings, and I hate compiler warnings.

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited May 2010
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    Most modern compilers support #pragma once. The only benefit I really ever noticed was that compiler time on large projects went down a few seconds.

    Yah, just saves me key strokes more than anything else. That's the benefit. I wasn't even aware it shaved compile time.

    Yeah, like I said, unless you're compiling a huge project (thousands of files) it's not even really noticeable. It just doesn't have to call the preprocessor to find out what it should be doing.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Yeah, I mean..

    If I have

    SomeControl.h

    and

    SomeOtherControl.h

    and for whatever reason I need to include them in each other.... this happens a lot in Objective-C I am finding when you have parent/child relationships and need a two-way bridge between the objects... I mean, technically you can not properly cast objects and just call the methods blindly, but this can cause compiler warnings, and I hate compiler warnings.

    Granted it's not good design, but, why not just include them in the same file?

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Yeah, I mean..

    If I have

    SomeControl.h

    and

    SomeOtherControl.h

    and for whatever reason I need to include them in each other.... this happens a lot in Objective-C I am finding when you have parent/child relationships and need a two-way bridge between the objects... I mean, technically you can not properly cast objects and just call the methods blindly, but this can cause compiler warnings, and I hate compiler warnings.

    Objective-C doesn't have pre-decleration?

    In C++ I would just do:
    Spoiler:

    Then in any .cpp file where I need them both, I include them both, and the order of include is irrelevant.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It does have that, that's what you need to do, actually.

    So that's the answer then, I guess.

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Also a great solution.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I dunno about Objective-C, but in C++ there are some limitations to pre-decleration. Mostly where the header itself contains code that actually tries to use or instantiate the pre-declared class. You will get compiler errors about incomplete types.

    It's easy to work around though, unless you have a template class that needs to be fully header implemented. Then in the case of a circular dependency, you are probably stuck with a cyclic include.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Can you show me an example of what you mean? This intrigues me.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Can you show me an example of what you mean? This intrigues me.

    Header:
    template<typename T>
    export class MyTemplateClass {
        template<typename T1>
        export void MyFunction(T1 arg);
    }
    
    

    Source:
    #include "header.h"
    
    template<typename T1>
    void MyTemplateClass::MyFunction(T1 arg) {
        doSomeStuff();
    }
    

    Only one C++ compiler actually supports it, and it was removed with C++0x.

    (I may not have gotten the syntax on that 100% right, but that should give you the gist of the export keyword).

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    I dunno about Objective-C, but in C++ there are some limitations to pre-decleration. Mostly where the header itself contains code that actually tries to use or instantiate the pre-declared class. You will get compiler errors about incomplete types.

    That, and if you're using a non-pointer of a pre-declared type in your definition of a structured type, you'll get that error too.

    maybe nothing else is real
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig~medium.jpgsteam~tinythumb.png
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    End wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    I dunno about Objective-C, but in C++ there are some limitations to pre-decleration. Mostly where the header itself contains code that actually tries to use or instantiate the pre-declared class. You will get compiler errors about incomplete types.

    That, and if you're using a non-pointer of a pre-declared type in your definition of a class or struct, you'll get that error too.

    Right, because that's considered instantiation to the compiler.

    This:
    MyClass _someVar;
    

    in your class actually causes the compiler to instantiate that object, and allocate storage for it. Which, as you said, will cause the incomplete type error.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Yeah, in the last thread I was lamenting that while we went over why including your source definitions using #include was oh god dammit just support export already.

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA check.php?c=OrokosPA
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
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  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Infidel wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Yeah, in the last thread I was lamenting that while we went over why including your source definitions using #include was oh god dammit just support export already.

    Yah, well, it will never happen now. C++0x removes the feature, but keeps the 'export' keyword reserved.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Yeah, in the last thread I was lamenting that while we went over why including your source definitions using #include was oh god dammit just support export already.

    Yah, well, it will never happen now. C++0x removes the feature, but keeps the 'export' keyword reserved.

    Those bastards!

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA check.php?c=OrokosPA
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Infidel wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Speaking of template implementation...I am sort of miffed that a) more compilers never supported 'export', and b) that C++0x is removing it and not forcing compilers to support it. Being able to actually define your template functions/classes separate from their deceleration is a good thing.

    Yeah, in the last thread I was lamenting that while we went over why including your source definitions using #include was oh god dammit just support export already.

    Yah, well, it will never happen now. C++0x removes the feature, but keeps the 'export' keyword reserved.

    Those bastards!

    Yah...

    But hey, in exchange we get lambdas and type inference, which I am a-okay with. I use the shit out of both of those features in my C++ work now.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Spoiler:

    I guess that means I should just go home early today. :-P

    maybe nothing else is real
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig~medium.jpgsteam~tinythumb.png
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Just to re-iterate how awesome type interference in C++ is, let's compare:
    stdext::hash_map<string, string>::iterator iter = _myMap.begin();
    

    versus
    auto iter = _myMap.begin();
    

    Ahhh, juicy syntactic sugar, how we love thee.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, D3: Brainling#1998, NintendoID: Brainling
  • KrisKris Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I've got what I'm sure is a very basic ASP.Net question.

    Lets say I'm browsing an ASP.Net site, in this case a forum, and see a url that looks like this:
    http://www.pitythefool.com/Forums/Topic478289-338-1.aspx
    

    Now, obviously they hadn't actually created a page in their VS project for that particular topic. So are they just using some sort of URL rewriting method?

    I've been playing around with ASP.Net again, and if I were building something like that, only way I could think of creating a topic display page that could display any given topic would be to use the query string like:
    http://www.pitythefool.com/Forums/Topic.aspx?p=478289-338-1
    

    But obviously that looks uglier. So before I start googling, am I correct in my assumption?

    Steam: Zephyrall || XBL: Zephyrall || PS3: Zephyrall_KN || Battle.Net: Zephyrall#398
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's called URL rewriting. It's a feature of IIS7.

    If you are on IIS6, it's a pain in the ass involving, I think, a plugin module and some config file, and there are 90 billion blog posts about it.

    If you are on IIS7, I believe you can just turn it on in your web config and rewrite rules go in as keys in your web config.

    Keep in mind, most shared ASP.NET hosts are probably on IIS6 still.

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • SenjutsuSenjutsu fiddy too Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's a pain in the butt to set up for IIS6

    Sarksus wrote: »
    I'm gonna get a PhD in incest.
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