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RADlands - Everyone shut the fuck up, VAMOS A BAILAR

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Posts

  • scarlet st.scarlet st. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Fine with either! I already have to delete "I say," from the beginning of half of Scarlett's sentences so

    japsig.jpg
  • CyenseCyense Registered User
    edited August 2010
    Really, though, just count me as a tiebreaker.

    anteater.png
  • StiltsStilts Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I vote RADlands.

    TIE AGAIN!

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Tie settled.

    We goin' RADlands.

    qsfwtzhym4ax.png
  • StiltsStilts Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
  • CyenseCyense Registered User
    edited August 2010
    Stilts

    You ready to wrassle?

    anteater.png
  • MarshmallowMarshmallow Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I'd take a bullet for tommy, probably.

    Not gonna let you take my best player, DE?AD.

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    But I can't kill you, Marsh.

    This is a conundrum.

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  • AntimatterAntimatter if you want to talk to me look elsewhere.Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    you can kill me, DE?AD

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
  • SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I'd take a bullet for tommy, probably.

    Not gonna let you take my best player, DE?AD.

    <img class=" title=":cry:" class="bbcode_smiley" />

  • StiltsStilts Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Cyense wrote: »
    Stilts

    You ready to wrassle?

    Absolutely.

    I learned all my moves from Hulk Hogan.

    A true American hero with a fantastic mustache.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    hey guys

    kinda spent the day in bed

    oh



    oh

    I was gonna vote for Beta

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • ShabootyShabooty Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    did someone say RADLands?

    oh. oh, hello thread

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Are you excited, Shaboot?

    Are you excited for RADlands?

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  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    de?ad we'll never know what happens in the beta!

    what becomes of the sexy and intelligent Orb and his lesser-known and less-important teammates?

    ARGH IT'S TEARING ME APART, LISA

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Those missions will now be the first your CCPD characters take on.

    Five hours will have passed.

    Omega Team will have a harder time of it than Alpha Team.

    Also, don' worry about it.

    qsfwtzhym4ax.png
  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    but what if I don't wanna be The Orb

    DE?AD STOP PIGEONHOLING ME

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • Tommy2HandsTommy2Hands what is this where am i Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    man, the sensitivity of this magic mouse is really low

    this might take some getting used to


    also, hey guys, safari or firefox?

    Tumbling
    MacGuffin wrote: »
    Baka!
    Belief in the heart of friendship and you'll always be kawaii Tommy-Chan!

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Firefox.

    Rane: You don't gotta be the Orb. He'll just be NPC'd and slipped into the background.

    qsfwtzhym4ax.png
  • Tommy2HandsTommy2Hands what is this where am i Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I'd take a bullet for tommy, probably.

    Not gonna let you take my best player, DE?AD.

    :D


    also see you in two hours guys I am going to jimmy buffets'

    I'm not sure how I feel about this

    Tdead gonna download it later

    Tumbling
    MacGuffin wrote: »
    Baka!
    Belief in the heart of friendship and you'll always be kawaii Tommy-Chan!

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    DE?AD wrote: »
    Firefox.

    Rane: You don't gotta be the Orb. He'll just be NPC'd and slipped into the background.

    But I need closure!

    also man I dunno

    I loved being The Orb

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DubhDubh REBEL REBEL Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Yeah. Firefox it up, Tommy. Computer geeks everywhere recommend it.

    Thing_zps6acf1883.png <---DE?AD makes games
  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Raneados wrote: »
    DE?AD wrote: »
    Firefox.

    Rane: You don't gotta be the Orb. He'll just be NPC'd and slipped into the background.

    But I need closure!

    also man I dunno

    I loved being The Orb

    It's entirely up to you, man.

    I'm actually sort of eager to get back to the RADlands, though, and I ain't gonna waste that.

    qsfwtzhym4ax.png
  • StiltsStilts Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Raneados wrote: »
    ARGH IT'S TEARING ME APART, LISA

    I watched that movie tonight with a couple friends.

    By the end, we were counting how many times characters greeted each other by saying, "Oh hi, [insert name here]."

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    DE?AD wrote: »
    Raneados wrote: »
    DE?AD wrote: »
    Firefox.

    Rane: You don't gotta be the Orb. He'll just be NPC'd and slipped into the background.

    But I need closure!

    also man I dunno

    I loved being The Orb

    It's entirely up to you, man.

    I'm actually sort of eager to get back to the RADlands, though, and I ain't gonna waste that.

    do the dew, man

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Stilts wrote: »
    Raneados wrote: »
    ARGH IT'S TEARING ME APART, LISA

    I watched that movie tonight with a couple friends.

    By the end, we were counting how many times characters greeted each other by saying, "Oh hi, [insert name here]."

    This became, and still kind of is, a thing among our group of friends.

    Which is funny, because only two of us have actually seen it.

    qsfwtzhym4ax.png
  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    i remember when mori almost joined us with a johnny character

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • Tommy2HandsTommy2Hands what is this where am i Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    okay, downloaded a mac app and now this magicmouse is rad as hell

    though it really should be awesome out of the box when it costs 70 bucks

    Tumbling
    MacGuffin wrote: »
    Baka!
    Belief in the heart of friendship and you'll always be kawaii Tommy-Chan!

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I am so very nearly finished.


    Also, this system is also done.

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  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Ladies and Lady-men, I give you...

    [100%]


    Core Mechanic
    [100%] uses a d100 (or two paired d10s) to resolve any actions whose outcome is not an entirely foregone conclusion. Things like opening a car door or writing a report are not, in general, worth rolling for. Opening a car door whilst speeding down the street on the back of a motorcycle, or writing a report in the middle of a fire-fight, however, are perfect examples of actions that would require a roll.

    Chance: “Chance” refers to the overall likelihood of an action succeeding. When attempting an action, if you roll under its Chance, you succeed. If you roll over, the attempt fails. It’s just that simple.
    Difficulty Levels: The difficulty of an action is rated in steps, which offer a guideline for determining the starting Chance of any given action. While the a character’s Skills and the environment itself can provide bonuses or penalties to an action’s Chance, only Traits alter its Difficulty.
    [100%] Not Worth Rolling
    [80%] Easy
    [60%] Average
    [40%] Problematic
    [20%] Challenging
    [0%] Difficult
    [-20%] Very Difficult
    [-40%] Herculean
    [-60%] Preposterous
    [-80%] Absurd
    [-100%] Nigh-Impossible
    [-120%] Inconceivable!

    These Difficulties are largely for ease of reference, and GMs are free to expand the list in both directions, or allow “mid-way” difficulties (30%, -45%, etc.) depending on the situation. Similarly, “step”, used when discussing Traits among other things, is simply shorthand for a 20% Chance increment.

    Outstanding Successes and Failures: Occasionally, a player may roll low enough below, or high enough above the Chance of an action to warrant special notice – these are called Outstanding Successes and Failures. A roll is a full 50% or more below the action’s Chance is an Outstanding Success, and the results of the action should be adjusted accordingly – a sword swing hits a particularly vulnerable area, a hacking attempt reveals a particularly valuable file, or a pick-up line turns out to be just the right thing to say. A roll 50% over the action’s Chance is an Outstanding Failure and things take a reasonable turn for the worse – the opponent knocks the sword out attacker’s hand, a hacking attempt alerts authorities to the hacker’s presence, or a pick-up line result in margarita to the face. Each additional full increment of 50% below or above the action’s Chance increases the results for better or worse, respectively.

    Characters
    No story would be able to go anywhere without characters, and an RPG is no different. Under player control, characters serve as a tool for interacting with the story and the game-world. Under GM control, they offer a powerful tool for manipulating the players, motivating the plot, and enriching the game-world.

    Characters in [100%] have two components – their Traits, which describe the character themselves, and their Skills, which represent the knowledge the character has picked up in their lifetime. Characters also have a Special and Stress rating, which measure their current control over the story, and the damage to their continued cool, respectively, but more on that later.


    Traits: Traits are the single most important aspect of any given character. They describe the character to the GM, the game, and the players, and determine that character’s personality, proficiency, and place in the world. A character’s Traits may change over time, as they develop, but each character will only ever have five Traits total, so it is important to be clear and concise when selecting them.
    What Traits Do: Traits are triggered when the character attempts an action, or has an action attempted against them, that the Trait would logically affect. When triggered, the Trait alters the Difficulty of the action – lowering the Difficulty of an action well-suited to your Trait, or raising the Difficulty of actions to which your Trait proves a direct detriment. By default a Trait can increase or decrease the Difficulty of an action by one step (+/- 20% Chance). Only one Trait can affect any given action at a time. In cases where multiple Traits could conceivably affect an action, use the most relevant.

    Traits and Stress: Traits also alter the severity of Stress gained by the character - raising or lowering any given Stress Gain by 10%. Traits can also increase the Stress Gains of those you target by the same amount – an insult by a character with a [Razor Wit] would cause a more Stress for its target, as would a bullet delivered by a [Master Marksman].

    Traits and Conflict: Traits do not just affect the character themselves, but also their opponents. Whenever a character is targeted by another character - be it by an attempted attack, an attempted pick-up in a bar, or a reasoned response in a debate – the target character’s most applicable Trait applies to the Chance of the action. So a character with [Blinding Speed] as his Talent, would increase the difficulty of an attempted sword-swing, while a character with the [Huge] Talent might actually lower it.

    Trait Ranks: As a character develops, they may gain Trait Ranks. These are applied to a specific Trait, as a “|” after the Trait’s name, and they serve to increase the potency of the Trait. Each added Rank increases the Trait’s ability to sway Chance by one step (+/- 20%), as well as increasing its ability to increase or decrease Stress Gains by 10%.

    Trait Mods: Trait Mods expand the utility of a Trait, and provide additional bonuses to that character’s Overdrive (see below). Each character begins with two Trait Mods, which can be applied to any of their Traits, in any combination they desire. Trait Mods are chosen from the following:
    [Armor] The Trait negates, instead of lowers, Stress gains when triggered. Overdrive: You do not gain Stress while in Overdrive.
    The Trait removes -5% Stress when triggered. Overdrive: Entering Overdrive drops your Stress to 0%.
    [Drive] The Trait grants a bonus to Chance equal to your Stress when triggered. Overdrive: You cannot suffer Breakdown while in Overdrive.
    [Luck] The Trait grants a +5% Chance when triggered. Overdrive: You gain a +50% to all actions while in Overdrive.
    [Muse] The Trait generates +5% Special when triggered. Overdrive: All Special gains are doubled while in Overdrive.
    [Power] The Trait lowers successes by -40% when triggered. Overdrive: All successes are lowered by -100% while in Overdrive.
    [Spirit] The Trait grants a bonus to Chance equal to your Special when triggered. Overdrive: You apply your Special as a bonus to Chance on all actions
    [Thorns] The Trait increases Stress gained by others by +5% when triggered. Overdrive: Entering Overdrive causes those around you +20% Stress.

    Types of Traits: Each character has five Traits, which fall into the following five categories.
    [Talent] A character’s Talent show where their true gifts lay – while their Profession hints at their training, a character’s Talent notes what sets them apart from others in their field. It could be a result of years of dedicated study at the hand of a master, a born knack, or some mixture of the two, but a character’s Talent puts them head and shoulders over those without their gifts.
    Sample Talents: Quick-Witted, Excessive Dexterity, Immense Strength, Expert Marksman, Iron Hand Master, Drop-Dead Gorgeous
    Super-Powered and Magical Characters: Characters with superhuman abilities should reflect this in their Traits, Talent in particular being a good option for noting it. In general, such abilities are split between Active powers and Passive powers. Passive powers, such as Invincibility, Super-Speed, Inhuman Strength, Mesmerizing Appearance, and the like noting the power as the character’s Talent should be proficient. For Active Powers, such as Fire Magic, Mind-Reading, Cryokinesis, Spatial Manipulation, or Shadow Control, the character should also pick up the Alteration, Conjuration, and Divination Skills as desired. Abilities that fall into the awkward middle ground such as Flight, Invisibility, Teleportation, are often best treated as Passive powers, with rolls defaulting to the nearest applicable Skill. For characters of a nonhuman species for which such gifts are normal, see Background (below).

    [Disposition] A character’s Disposition is their personality, or, at least, the personality they put forward. It may not be the first thing someone notices about a character, but it’s likely the second, and almost always the thing they remember. Whether the character is a stone-faced stalwart type, a bubbly ditz, or an insufferably witty trickster, your Disposition is likely to have a strong impact on how others treat them.
    Sample Dispositions: Cheery, Charming, Femme Fatal, Grizzled, Innocent, Fiery

    [Profession] A character’s Profession notes what they spend the vast majority of their time doing – whether it be an actual profession, or simply a life-long calling. A character who spends their nights tracking down and slaying ancient evils would take Monster Hunter as their Profession, regardless of his part-time job at the 7-11, just as a wandering, penitent and penniless monk would list his Profession as Pilgrim. Whether or not the character receives payment for their Profession, its selection is important as, even more than Talent, Profession determines the sort of Skills and training a character will possess.
    Sample Professions: Ace Detective, Warrior, Professor of Archeology, Masked Vigilante, Soldier, Two-Bit Thug, Rockstar

    [Background] A character’s background encompasses the most formative portion of their life prior to their current profession, or the current adventure. It could note their childhood, whether they grew up on the streets or in a magical academy. It could focus on their teenage years, spent in a secluded farming village or aboard a colony ship. It could document their time in the army, or the millennia they spent in the Dreamscape while their bodies were regrown in a vat. Nonhuman characters - such as elves, dwarves, robots, Martians, vampires, wolves, and the like – should note their species as their Background.
    Sample Backgrounds: Ex-Marine, Street Urchin, Pilgrim, Raised by Wolves, Crown Prince, Mega-Corp Heir, Spoiled Suburbanite

    [Flaw] A character’s Flaw is the one thing that, despite what else might happen, nags at them. It’s that little bit of turmoil that follows them no matter where they go, that issue that just keeps haunting them, be it a taste for strong drink, womanizing, maninizing, or just a string of tragedies that seem to follow the character. Note that most Flaws are of a psychological or social nature – they are an important part of the character’s, well, character. Physical Flaws should be reserved for truly crippling or thematically important disabilities – paraplegia, blindness, muteness, or the like. Similarly, phobias, delusions, and the like should only be used as a Flaw if they are massive, part of the character’s personality.
    Sample Flaws: Alcoholism, Compulsive Carousing, Hard Knock Life, Overconfidence, Anger Issues, Low Self-Esteem, Cowardice


    Skills: Skills represent your character’s talent or training in specific areas of expertise. Whereas Traits describe the character themselves, Skills are simply a list of things he has some proficiency in.
    Using Skills: Each Skill is has a percentile rating, starting at 0% and going up to 100%. Whenever a character attempts an action that would fall under a given Skill, they apply their Skill rating as a bonus to the action’s Chance. Only one Skill can apply to any single action. In cases where two might be of use, use whichever is more relevant. Having multiple Skills relating to an action may, at the GM’s discretion, provide a +5% to +20% bonus to Chance.

    Skills and Traits: Traits determine how a character’s Skills function, and, to a large degree, what actions they will be attempting with said Skills – two characters may both have Marksmanship 35%, but if one has [Dwarven Ranger] as his Background, and the other [Ex-Subspace Marine], they are going to be applying it to very different weapons, just as a [Lead Guitarist] and a [Horror Writer] will be using their Artistry 50% for entirely separate purposes.

    Specialization Penalty: While Skills are fairly broad, and characters are certainly welcome to have a broad base of knowledge and training, not everyone can do everything, As such, some Skills, particularly those requiring deep understanding over very specific things, suffer a Specialization penalty. This penalty applies whenever the character attempts an action with a Skill that is not covered by their Traits.

    Note that any Trait with any Skill - so a character with the Profession [Rockstar] and the Background [Ex-Quantum Physicist] could use their Theory Skill to contemplate both quantum mechanics and the use of reverb, but if he attempted to use it to meditate on the nature of religion, he would suffer Theory’s Specialization penalty.

    Purchasing Skills: Each character begins the game with 100% to spread among the Skills they would like their character to have. Unlike Traits, you can have as many Skills as you like, so long as you have the %s to invest in them.
    What Skills Ratings Mean:
    [5%] Dabbler
    [10%] Amateur
    [20%] Professional
    [30%] Expert
    [40%-50%] Master
    [60%-70%] Best-in World
    [80%-90%] Absurdly Proficient
    [100%] Superhuman Mastery

    Skill Descriptions:
    [Physical Skills]
    Athletics: The character is well coordinated and fit. This Skill applies to any general physical activity not directly covered by another Skill. Depending on the character’s Traits it could also include training in any manner of activities – football, basketball, rock-climbing, scuba-diving, hang-gliding, horse-riding, sneaking about, skateboarding, and the like.
    Sample Difficulties: Climbing a rough rock face (20%), Running across difficult terrain (40%), Leaping fifty feet in the air from a stand-still (-120%)
    Specialization: None

    Close Combat: The character is trained in melee combat. Depending on their Traits, this could include wrestling, martial arts, brawling or fighting with melee weapons – such as swords, knives, axes, maces, or even the character’s claws and teeth.
    Sample Difficulties: Punching an opponent in the gut (60%), Snapping an opponent’s arm with a grab (-20%), Slicing an opponent’s throat mid-fight with a knife (-40%), Slipping a sword through armor and piercing the opponent’s heart (-100%).
    Specialization: -20% or -40% for particularly dissimilar weapons.

    Marksmanship: The character is trained in the use of ranged weapons. Depending on their Traits, this might mean archery, the use of firearms, throwing knives, heat-vision, or proton-blasters.
    Sample Difficulties: Scoring a center-of-mass shot at 100 feet with a pistol (0%), Hitting an opponent in the leg at 20 feet (40%), Putting an arrow into someone’s eye from 250 feet during a snow-storm (-100%)
    Specialization: -40% or -60% for exceptionally dissimilar weapons.

    Perception: The character is alert and aware. This skill is used to notice any activity or object that might otherwise be overlooked, including sneaking characters, clues at a crime scene, the sound of gunshot from another room, the flicker of light from under a locked door, etc. Depending on their Traits, this Skill could also cover exotic sense – infrared vision, echolocation, life-sign scanners, or the like.
    Sample Difficulties: Noticing a faint creak of the floor in an adjacent room (20%), Spotting gunfire in the windows of the building two blocks down (0%), Catching the bloodstain on Sgt. Pillsbury’s collar (0%), Hearing the guard’s elevated heartbeat from across the room (-100%)
    Specialization: None

    [Technical Skills]
    Artistry: The character is capable of creating or performing great works of art. Depending on their Traits, Artistry could be cover painting, writing, dancing, acting, playing an instrument, or producing full-sensory illusions or holograms.
    Sample Difficulties: Write a perfectly passable if unimaginative novel (20%), Create a true masterpiece (-60%), Craft a work of art so inspiring that it causes revolution that spreads across the globe (-200%)
    Specialization: -60%

    Device Use: The character is skilled in the operation of various technological devices. Depending on their Traits, Device Use could include computer programming/hacking, the placing or disarming of demolitions, the operation of high-tech scientific scanners, or the targeting of bombs, jump-drives, catapults, mortars, or anything else that could conceivably require targeting.
    Sample Difficulties: Disarming a simple explosive (20%), Hacking into a highly secure network (-20%), Hone in on a distress call coming from within an electrical anomaly (-60%), Using a PDA to take command of an invading alien fleet (-200%)
    Specialization: -80% or -100% for exceptionally dissimilar devices.

    Engineering: The character is trained in the design, construction, repair, and maintenance of items. Depending on their Traits, Engineering could cover electrical, mechanical, structural, or even chemical engineering.
    Sample Difficulties: Constructing a working radio with adequate time and parts (60%), Customizing a vehicle for harsh conditions (20%), Repairing a vehicle from near-destruction using only scrap metal and trash (-100%), Inventing a revolutionary new source of energy which will solve all the world’s problems (-200%)
    Specialization: -100%

    Medicine: The character is trained in the treatment of injuries and illnesses. Depending on their Traits, this could include field medicine, surgery, diagnosis, psychiatry or psychology, pharmaceutical knowledge, or even magical healing.
    Sample Difficulties: Stitching up a wound (40%), Splinting a broken leg (60%), Devising a cure for a strange and deadly illness (-40%), Curing a shell-shocked veteran of PTSD in three hours (-160%), Restoring life to long-dead tissue (-160%).
    Specialization: -80%

    Subterfuge: The character is trained in chicanery. Depending on their Traits, this could include sleight of hand, wilderness camouflage, forgery, disguise, or any other form of deception not specifically covered by another Skill.
    Sample Difficulties: Slipping an item from a stranger’s coat pocket in a crowd (40%), Counterfeiting passable foreign currency (-40%), Disguising yourself as a head of state (-80%), Literally stealing a character’s heart (-200%).
    Specialization: -40%

    Vehicle Operation: The character is skilled in piloting or driving vehicles. Depending on their Traits, this could include cars, tanks, boats, spaceships, or even more exotic craft. Note that most routine actions with a familiar vehicle do not require a roll – rolls are usually only required when a character attempts to operate an unfamiliar vehicle, or perform a particularly tricky maneuver or stunt.
    Sample Difficulties: Piloting a space-freighter through a dense asteroid belt (-40%), Drift a car into a parallel parking spot (20%), Steering a boat through a perfect storm (-40%), Flying a bi-plane through a cramped cave system (-120%)
    Specialization: -80% or -100% for exceptionally dissimilar vehicles

    [Knowledge Skills]
    Practice: The character is trained in the policies, procedures, and application of their field of expertise. Depending on their Traits, Practice could be used to represent a client in a courtroom, managing a business, occupying administrative office, navigating government bureaucracy, or producing and promoting a record.
    Sample Difficulties: Running a routine religious ceremony (60%), Organizing and overseeing efficient R&D team (20%), Finding a loop-hole in the legal system that allows you to get away with murder (-60%), Running a successful presidential campaign as an independent candidate while spending only $3 (-180%)
    Specialization: -100%

    Theory: The character has a good grip on the basic, fundamental concepts of their field of expertise, and the theoretical extensions thereof. Depending on their Traits, this could be an understanding of the rules and underlying principles of music, law, physics, biology, economy, art, philosophy, civics, or any other such field.
    Sample Difficulties: Laying down the basic philosophies of a branch religion (0%), Solving a world-stumping mathematical conundrum (-80%), Developing a new method of scientific thought (-160%)
    Specialization: -100%

    Lore: The character is versed in the accumulated knowledge of their field of expertise. Depending on their Traits, Lore could include an archeologist’s familiarity with ancient cultures and languages, a musician’s knowledge of genres and instruments, a colonel’s understanding of tactics and weaponry, or the like.
    Sample Difficulties: Recalling a somewhat obscure bit of pop culture (40%), Reciting the Chant of Five Souls from memory (-40%), Remembering the eightieth verse of a lost Plutonian fire-ballad from several centuries ago (-140%)
    Specialization: -100%

    Culture: The character is well acquainted with the people, places, and personalities surrounding their field of expertise. Depending on their Traits, this could include a familiarity with foreign dignitaries and world powers, leading minds in a scientific field, revered magical schools and top wizards, or underworld players and powers.
    Sample Difficulties: Remembering the name of the Prime Minister’s granddaughter (20%), Recalling the thirty-fifth ranked institute of telepatheatrics (-40%), Remembering the password to the Secret Bar of Dead Musicians’ Wisconsin branch (-140%)
    Specialization: -100%

    [Interaction Skills]
    Persuasion: The character is skilled in dealing with people, whether it be convince a guard to release them, picking up someone at a bar, or delivering a rousing speech. Depending on the character’s Traits, this could take the form of a quiet charm, infectious enthusiasm, a good-natured demeanor, or the like.
    Sample Difficulties: Getting the inn keeper to offer you a two gold discount (40%), Convincing a nervous bank-robber to flee without shooting anyone (-20%), Calming an angry boar (-80%), Talking a tyrant into transferring control of his nation to you (-140%),
    Specialization: None

    Manipulation: The character is skilled in the manipulation of others, Depending on their Traits this could be through promises of sex or violence, black-mail, praying on their insecurities, or simple pandering.
    Sample Difficulties: Intimidating a timid man into giving you his wallet (60%), Seducing a pious and chaste monk (0%), Manipulating a pacifist into killing twenty innocent men (-100%), Blackmailing a tribe of gorillas into overthrowing a nearby kingdom (-200%)
    Specialization: None

    Empathy: The character is adept at reading the emotions and intents of others. This Skill can be used to detect lies, gain insight to someone’s character, sense hostile intent, or similar things. Depending on their Traits, this could be an understanding of psychology, an inherent knack for “getting” people, or low-level psychic abilities.
    Sample Difficulties: Sensing that a character is lying (20%), Assessing the general nature of an acquaintance (40%), Perfectly determining the history and emotional state of a strange (-100%), Guessing the name of an alien’s paternal great-grandfather based solely on their body language (-200%)
    Specialization: None


    [Supernatural Skills]
    Alteration: The character is capable of an object’s state or structure. Depending on their Traits, this could be the ability to control shadows, shape water, freeze or heat objects, move objects with telekinesis, mind-control, command plants, control machines via cybernetic implants, mutate living creatures, bend space and time, or any other such power.
    Sample Difficulties: Redirecting the flow of a stream (40%), Turning a match’s flame into ten-foot pillar of flame (0%), Ripping a portal across the Atlantic Ocean (-60%), Completely rewriting an opponent’s personality (-160%)
    Specialization: -300%

    Conjuration: The character is capable of forge objects out of ambient energy, pull them from adjoining dimensions, or simply will them into being. Depending on their Traits, this could be used to conjure magical constructs, create fire or lightning, erect force-fields, or call down heavenly servants.
    Sample Difficulties: Conjuring a small burst of fire (60%), Creating a ten foot block of solid stone (40%), Summoning a lake into being (-40%), Willing a fully occupied city into existence (-200%),
    Specialization: -300%

    Divination: The character is capable of obtaining information through supernatural means. Depending on their Traits this could be through mind-reading, remote viewing, precognition, communing with gods or the spirits of the dead, accessing knowledge from past lives, or cybernetic implants pulling information from the INFORMOWEB.
    Sample Difficulties: Reading a character’s surface thoughts (40%), Finding the location of an oasis in a desert (0%), Pulling a person’s entire life-history and current location from a single drop of dried blood (-120%)
    Specialization: -300%


    Special: Special, rated from 0% to 100%, represents a character’s momentum, their drive, their moxie, and their adrenaline. It is that which keeps the character going, and allows them to face down overwhelming odds with style and a remarkably high rate of success. Characters may “spend” their Special to gain temporary boosts or benefits, or save it to enter Overdrive in Conflict.

    All characters begin with 0% Special, but may gain it as the game progresses.
    Gaining and Losing Special: Special is gained whenever the character does something outstanding, be it a show of bravado, a remarkable bit of character development, a bit of wit that gets the other players laughing, or the like. It is a reward to the player and his character for being helpful, impressive, or just plain entertaining. +5% Special is a nice treat for doing a minor bit of good, while exceptionally dramatic or awe-inspiring actions may result up to +60 or 70% Special.

    On the opposite end, GMs should not be afraid to punish disruptive players with minor Special loss. Only particularly aggravating or annoying actions should cause a Special loss, and loses should never be higher than -10 or 15% Special.

    Special Effects: Special may be used to purchase certain effects within the game. Special may be spent at any time, even outside of a character’s turn in Conflict. Spent Special is immediately subtracted from the character, and the effect activates instantly.
    Special Effects:
    [10%] Lower the difficult of an Action by one step. You may buy this effect multiple times on an action.
    [25%] Escape or ignore an effect, including attacks.
    [40%] Drop Stress to 0%
    [40%] Take an immediate extra turn.
    [60%] Gain an extra Trait Mod for the duration of the scene.
    [60%] Remove an Injury, or remove one Rank from a Ranked Injury.

    Overdrive: When a character reaches 100% Special, they may enter a state of Overdrive. A character in Overdrive is at the top of their game, deep in their flow, and, generally, very difficult to bring down. They gain a +50% Chance to all actions, and enemies suffer -50% Chance on actions against them, in addition to the normal Overdrive bonuses granted to them by their Trait Mods.

    Characters in Overdrive lose 20% Special each round at the end of their turn. When their Special reaches 0%, the Overdrive ends. Overdrive may only be activated during Conflict, and, once activated, it cannot be purposefully deactivated.


    Stress: Stress represents just that – stress. More specifically, it refers to any damage to a character’s psychological stability. The higher a character’s Stress, the closer they are to a complete breakdown.
    Gaining Stress: Character’s can gain Stress through all manner of means, whether they be from injuries, insults, or simple inconveniences. A +5% Stress gain merely represents a minor bit of annoyance, whereas a +75% means a serious, debilitating blow to the character’s cool.
    [Sample Stress Gains]
    [+5%] A twisted ankle, a slap to the face, or a straight diss.
    [+10%] A narrow (10%) miss by a lethal weapon, a punch to the stomach, a car breaking down, a truly stinging insult
    [+50%] A near miss by an explosion, a relatively harmless car-crash, a shallow wound by a lethal weapon, a punch to the face.
    [+75%] A gut wound, a broken limb, a lethal shot to a close friend,
    [+100%] A sword through the eye, a bullet to the head, irrefutable proof that everything you ever believed is wrong, caught by a grenade
    [+200%]: Nuclear blast, thrown into a sun, tossed from a space-ship, hit with a blast of non-existence, etc.

    Though Stress gains higher than 100% are listed, any given character has a maximum of 100% Stress, anything further is simply overflow.

    Injuries: Injuries are temporary, negative Traits gained when a character takes a serious wound to his mind, body, soul, or social standing. Whenever a single effect causes a character to gain 25% or more Stress, they gain an Injury. For instance, a character hit with a sword might gain [Crippled Arm], while a character struck with a devastating insult might suffer [Debilitated Self-Esteem]. Injuries work exactly like Traits, save that they are entirely detrimental – raising the difficulty of the character’s actions, and lowering the difficulty of those acting against the character.

    Like Traits, characters may only possess five Injuries at a time - any further Injuries sustained merely increase the Rank by one per additional Injury. An Injury’s Rank is also increased for each multiple of 25% Stress dealt in the initial effect – so shot from a pistol that caused a +75% Stress gain could cause a [Gut Wound ||].

    Thankfully, Injuries also share Traits’ one-per-action rule, and, regardless of how many applicable Injuries the character may have, only the most applicable applies to one given action.

    Removing Injuries: Injuries remain with a character until they are removed by someone with the appropriate Skills and Traits. Thus a [Gifted Surgeon] with could use Medicine to remove a [Broken Leg] Injury, a [Therapist] could use Medicine to cure a case of [Self-Loathing], or a [Blood Mage] use his Alteration to siphon out a [Debilitating Poison]. The difficulties of these actions vary depending on their nature, and the Injury itself adjusts their difficulty to its full extent.

    Breakdown: When a character reaches 100% Stress, they suffer a Breakdown. A character in Breakdown is too distraught, agonized, worried, or afraid to gain any serious momentum. They have officially lost their shit, and cannot gain Special or attempt any action that would require a roll. A character remains in Breakdown until their Stress is returned to 0%, be it through external aid or simple rest.

    Death: If a character is put into Breakdown by a lethal effect (a bullet, a sword, a well-aimed fist, an explosion, etc.) or if they are hit with a lethal effect while in Breakdown, they are rendered dead. This is most unfortunate, and should be avoided.

    Losing Stress: Characters can lose Stress through medical treatment, psychiatric care, magical spells, divine intervention, or through simple rest and relaxation. How much Stress can be lost is extremely contextual, and each situation should be considered separately. In general, though, a character at rest in a comfortable environment loses roughly 25% Stress each hour, while a short rest in the middle of a fight could, at beast, lower Stress by -5%. Care and treatment from other characters, especially those with appropriate Traits and Skills, can speed Stress loss substantially.

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  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Continued!

    Character Advancement: As the game progresses, so do the characters – becoming stronger, faster, or smarter, learning to use their talents to their greatest potential, and honing their abilities. This is represented as Progress, a rating which only comes up at the end of each session or mission, and which can be used to purchase character improvements.
    Gaining Progress: At the end of a session, or mission, or quest, or however else you choose to break up the players’ specific adventures, characters are rewarded with Progress, based on their activity during their previous outing. The better their performance, the more Progress they are awarded. Remeber, however, that better does not always mean more successful.
    [Sample Progress Gains]
    [+35%] Entered Overdrive (+20% Progress for each additional Overdrive)
    [+15%] Ended the session with 30% Special or higher (+30% Progress for ending the session with 100% Special)
    [+10%] Received an Outstanding Success or Failure (+5% for each additional Outstanding Success or Failure)
    [+5%] Entered Breakdown
    [+5%] Received an Injury
    [+60%] Completed a goal important to the character
    [+70%] Defeated a major, reoccurring antagonist
    [+20%] Last Man Standing (All other player characters enter Breakdown)
    [+10%] Received more failures than successes

    Spending Progress: Progress can be used to “purchase” Skill increases, Trait Ranks, and even Trait Mods, A player may purchase as many character improvements as he likes, and can even opt to “bank” Progress for the end of the next session – keep in mind, though, that Progress has a maximum of 100%, and any extra Progress is lost.
    Character Improvements:
    [20%] Increase an existing Skill by +5%
    [40%] Learn a new Skill, setting it to 5%
    [50%] Swap out a Trait for a new one of the same category ([Talent] for [Talent], [Background] for [Background], etc.)
    [60%] Increase a Trait’s Rank by +1
    [80%] Gain a new Trait Mod



    Conflict
    Conflict is any event in which two or more parties vie for position – a space-ship race, a dogfight, a prolonged debate, or a good old fashioned barroom brawl.
    Acting During Conflict: During conflict, the game progresses in Rounds, during which each participant in the Conflict can take one Action. An action can be anything your character could normally do – such as firing a weapon at an enemy, piloting a jet, or filling out their taxes. The exact time a turn represents, and thus the nature of the actions you take, changes depending on the nature of the conflict:
    Immediate Conflicts: Immediate Conflicts are any rapid-paced, quickly resolved competition, with turns ranging from five to ten seconds in length - the bread and butter of action and adventure games. Arguments, chases, physical fights, races, sporting matches, dance-offs, and the like are all Immediate Conflicts. Physical, Tech, and Interaction skills are the order of the day, while Knowledge skills will be of little, if any, use. The vast majority of Conflicts seen in a game will be Immediate.
    Extended Conflicts: More methodical and longer lasting, Extended Conflicts are more suited for competitions in which the competitors have plenty of time to maneuver, and may never even see each-other face to face, with turns lasting anywhere from hours to days. Manhunts, political campaigns, military maneuvering, academic competitions, and the like are all Extended Conflicts. Knowledge and Interaction skills are the foremost options in Extended Conflicts, though others may pop up now and then.

    Multiple Actions: You may attempt multiple actions on your turn, but it’s not easy – and each additional action increases the difficult of all other actions by one step.

    Ending Conflict: Conflict ends, quite simply, once there is no longer a contention between the involved parties, whether that be because a compromise was reached, a race won, or because all but one of the parties have been killed.



    Modifications and Optional Rules
    While the basic rules of [100%] are designed to be as streamlined and easy-to-use as possible, certain players and GMs will want a little more grit or detail in their game. In the interest of those good people, here are a list of optional rules to increase the depth of [100%]’s play.
    Equipment: Equipment is any item a character wears or wields to increase their abilities. While [100%] normally handles items as narrative extensions of a character, these Equipment rules allow players and GMs to single out specific items as being “above and beyond” the normal – items well-crafted, powerful, or magical enough to provide that user with an actual, mechanical advantage.
    Equipment “Slots”: When using the Equipment rules, each character has three “slots” which they can use to equip useful devices. Any equipment can be placed in these slots, be it armor, weaponry, gravitational distortion belts, arcane tattoos, or any other nonsense the GM might supply. While in these slots the items in question are considered “Equipped” and function exactly like Traits – raising or lowering Chance by one step per rank, and increasing or decreasing Stress gains by 10% per Rank, with only one piece of Equipment applying to any given action.

    Note that a character can carry any amount of equipment (within reason) but only the three items in their slots count as Equipped, and only Equipped items provide any meaningful bonus.

    Equipment in these slots can be swapped in and out whenever the character likes, though certain items (armor, arcane tattoos, etc.) may take longer to remove.



    [RADlands Mods]
    RAD : RAD is now a narrative effect. Certain areas are high, certain areas are low, and there are no numbers attached to it. Fuck those numbers.
    [IrRADiated] Injury: Coming into contact with a particularly large source of RAD may irRADiate you. This counts as an Injury, save that it is considered applicable to all actions. Only higher-ranked Injuries take precedence over it. Unlike other Injuries [IrRADiated] actually lowers the difficulty of one type of action – Dickery.
    Dickery: Any character can attempt a Dickery action. Dickery rolls can be used to create the same effects as a use of the Alteration or Conjuration Skills. Non-Freaker, Non-IrRADiated characters suffer a -60% Specialization to these rolls, however, and no Traits are considered applicable.

    Species: The various species do not gain custom Trait mods or Traits, but, instead, alternate versions of Special. Each version of Special can be gained and used in different ways, as well as a custom Overdrive bonus, as listed below (Note: Trait Mods that deal with Special still function normally – simply replace the species’ respective alternatives):
    Humans (Spirit): In a world torn apart by madness, humanity is not defined by its technology, or its culture, but by its sheer, bull-headed determination and possibly maniacal will to survive.
    Gaining Spirit: Spirit is gained exactly as unmodified Special.
    Spirit Effects:
    [10%] Lower the difficult of an Action by one step. You may buy this effect multiple times on an action.
    [25%] Escape an effect, including attacks.
    [60%] Gain an extra Trait Mod for the duration of the scene.
    [50%] Increase a Skill by 25% for the duration of the scene.
    [20%] Gain 20% Stress and enter Overdrive.
    [10%] Gain 10% Stress and attempt an action while in Breakdown.

    Spirit Overdrive: Spirited Overdrive works exactly as per the normal Overdrive rules.


    Mutants (Blood): More than any other species, Mutants are durable – they forge on despite massive physical damage. They exemplify the old adage of “whatever doesn’t kill me makes me stronger”. Each wound, each scratch, each illness only furthers their mutation, making them tougher, faster, and more deadly.
    Mutant Castes: Mutant Castes (Supreme, Brute, Swift, Cerebral, etc.) are now handled as part of your [Background].
    Gaining Mutation: Mutants gain +5% Blood for whenever they suffer a Stress Gain from a physical effect, and +20% Special per Rank of any physical Injury they take.
    Blood Effects:
    [50%] Gain the Armor, Thorns, or Drive Trait Mod for the duration of the scene.
    [50%] Change your [Talent] Trait. Talent received must be physical (or psionic for Cerebrals/social for Supremes).
    [40%] Drop Stress to 0%.
    [40%] Take an immediate extra turn.
    [20%] Gain a +50% Chance on a physical action (or psionic for Cerebrals/social for Supremes).
    [30%] Remove an Injury, or remove one Rank of a Ranked Injury.
    [80%] Recover from Death.

    Blood Overdrive: Your physical Traits gain four Ranks while in Overdrive.


    Psychers (Tetsuo): The minds of Psychers have been touched by the Crash, and it has granted them tremendous, remarkably focused, power. As of yet, only a few have truly tapped into their potential, but, with every use of their abilities, they move closer to unlocking all the energy contained within them.
    Psycher Specializations: Psycher Specializations (Cryokinesis, Pyrokinesis, Telepathy, etc.) are now handled through the selection of your [Talent], and the purchasing of the Alteration and Divination Skills. No psychers, not even Cryokinetics or Pyrokinetics, have the Conjuration Skill – they manipulate existing energies, not create new ones.
    Gaining Tetsuo: Psychers gain +15% Tetsuo whenever they gain an Outstanding Success, and for each additional level of the Outstanding Success. Psychers may also gain +5% Tetsuo by spending an action in Conflict to charge their minds (this usually involves screaming and balling their fists).
    Tetsuo Effects:
    [30%] Gain +1 Rank to your [Talent] for the duration of the scene.
    [20%] Take an immediate action using Alternation or Divination.
    [10%] Ignore the Specialization penalty on Alteration or Divination for one action.

    Tetsuo Overdrive: Your [Talent] increases by ten Ranks while in Overdrive. Your Tetsuo drops by -40% (not -20%) each round at the end of your turn while in Overdrive.


    Robots (Upgrade): Robots lack the tenacity of humans, the durability of the mutant horde, and the sheer power of the psychers, but what they do have is adaptability. Robots are modular, and their minds are easily reprogrammed to fit whichever needs are required.
    Robonet: Robots may use Device Use to operate the Robonet.
    Gaining Upgrade: Robots can gain a +10% Upgrade by with a successful Engineering or Device Use action (-20% Chance, Requires Appropriate Trait), increasing by +10% Upgrade for each level of Outstanding Success on the roll. An Outstanding Failure resets the robot’s Upgrade to 0%. This action requires an hour of work, regardless of its success, and only one attempt may be made per hour, but the robot does not have to take this action themselves.
    Upgrade Effects:
    [25%] Increase a Trait by +1 Rank for the duration of the scene.
    [15%] Increase a Skill by 10% for the duration of the scene.
    [25%] Gain a Skill at +5% for the duration of the scene.
    [40%] Increase the Rank of an Equipment Slot (effectively increasing the Rank of any item equipped there).
    [50%] +30% Progress

    Upgrade Overdrive: Robots cannot enter Overdrive.


    Freakers (RAD): Freakers, more than anyone else in the Wastes, have been altered by the RAD. Their bodies and minds have been infused by it, their very souls sing in tune with the RAD. They have let it enter them, change them, suffuse their very being. When the RAD favors them, no one can stand against a Freaker.
    Dickery: Freakers use Dickery actions just like anyone else. They may not purchase the Creation, Alteration, or Divination abilities.
    Freaker Robots: Freaker robots are, as always, just treated as Freakers. Their robot-nature is as irrelevant as a human Freaker’s human-nature.
    Gaining RAD : Freakers may raise their RAD by +5%, or by +10% per hour in high-RAD areas. Being [IrRADiated] doubles these numbers.
    RAD Effects:
    [15%] Decrease the difficulty of a Dickery action by one step. You may buy this effect multiple times on an action.
    [10%] Take an immediate Dickery action.
    [5%] Gain a Skill a +5% RAD.
    [40%] Become [IrRADiated] or increase your [IrRADiated] Injury by one Rank.

    RAD Overdrive: Your [IrRADiated] Injury gains five Ranks, and imposes no penalties to other actions, and gains two Trait Mods of your choice for the duration of the Overdrive.

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  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    OH FUCK YOU I WAS GONNA GO TO BED

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    NO

    NO


    I WILL INSTEAD COMPLAIN

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    fuckin text holy goddamn

  • DuxDux A host to DarknessRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Well hot damn, text. Well done, De?ad. Will Henry and Kain and the like get custom species special or something?

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Henry can take [Subneural Networking] as his Talent and purchase Alteration and Divination as desired.

    Cecil can take [Glowblood Mutant] as his Background. He has RAD as his Special, but may use it to buy Blood effects. He gains the Freaker Overdrive.

    Kain gains RAD as his Special, but can use it to buy Spirit effects. He may equip [Carbosilicate Swords] as one of his three Equipment Slots. He gains the Human Overdrive.

    Dan gains an extra Trait Mod of his choice to place on his most cowboyish Trait.

    Jayce can take [Shiftskin Mutant] as his Background, and purchase the Alteration Skill for his shape-shifting.

    Sydney can, obviously, choose [Electrokinesis] as her Talent, if Neo so desires.

    Makali gains RAD, but may use it to purchase Tetsuo options as well. He may opt for either Overdrive. Cobalt counts as [IrRADiated] all the time.

    Everyone starts with 140% to spend, and two Trait Ranks to apply. Those with Black Cards start with 150%, Robots gain an extra +20% or two Equipment Slot Ranks.

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  • SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    was the decision to lose tag skill mods to discourage people from coupling them with their tag trait mods?

  • DE?ADDE?AD Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Nope. If you'll remember, [Focus] used to specifically encourage that.

    I forget my reasoning right now, though.

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