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Chargeback for purchase of fake anti-malware software

HachfaceHachface Registered User regular
edited July 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So my dad was fooled into purchasing a rogue anti-malware program (AV Security Suite Platinum, for the curious). He's now out $70. Obviously he should tell his bank what happened, watch out for unauthorized purchases, and get a new credit card number.

Does he have any hope of getting his $70 back? It is highly unlikely he'll be able to get in touch with anyone behind the scam, much less get them to consent to the refund. So what is the process like when you ask a bank for a chargeback? He's with Bank of America, if that helps.

Hachface on

Posts

  • SixSix Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Call the bank, dispute the charge.

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  • FiggyFiggy Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Was this on his credit card? Call the number on the back of the card and issue a charge back. Just be honest. You shouldn't have a problem at all.

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  • Mmmm... Cocks...Mmmm... Cocks... Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I have an uncle that did the same thing, though probably not the same exact program/scamers.
    He did manage to get his money back from the scamer just by calling them up strangely enough.

  • SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shouldn't be a problem. I've read many cases of kids taking their parent's credit cards to purchase stuff for their online games (e.g. Maplestory) and when said parent notices the charge weeks later, decides to cancel it and all that happens is that junior's game account is suspended.

    So in this case what can go wrong? Lose your subscription to AV security suite platinum?

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  • oncelingonceling Registered User
    edited July 2010
    Since you didn't receive the service paid for there should be no trouble using that as your claim for chargeback. Also mention its a scam, not sure if they will block that merchant as a whole but they damn well should.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Also, since it is a scam, and since those scamming assholes tend to fall into groups of scamming assholes, he should probably cancel his card and get a new card issued.

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  • NoizlanifNoizlanif Polls for the Poll Throne! On Nexus!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Bank of America has one of the best dispute processes around for situation's such as this. When he contacts them, they will issue him a temporary credit for the amount of the charge. They will then go through with the whole chargeback process. In this situation it's not fraud, it would be a situation of non-receipt of services. They will go out on a chargeback, and in 45-60 days the funds will become permanent. Blocking the card can help if the charge isn't recurring, merchant's can still charge you after you cancel the card if it is recurring.

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  • NoizlanifNoizlanif Polls for the Poll Throne! On Nexus!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Also, he just needs to attempt to contact the merchant, if they can not be reached that is fine. Chargeback processors can get around that by useing that as an attempt to resolve. They have about a 80% chance of full recovery in a situation like this Hachface.

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  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Also, since it is a scam, and since those scamming assholes tend to fall into groups of scamming assholes, he should probably cancel his card and get a new card issued.

    Even though you said in the OP that it's obvious, I had to lime this advice for "holy-crap-do-this".

    Additionally, cancel all other credit cards used on that computer since the installation of that fake antimalware software, and change all passwords used (particularly banking ones), if you haven't already. Consider reformatting the system, if it's at all possible.

    Not only was that antimalware software fake, there's an extremely good chance it dropped other nasty things on the computer, up to and including trojans and rootkits. Since not everyone buys into the scareware schemes, the douchebags who push these infections tend to steal from folks in other ways, and leave backdoors on systems, too.

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  • HachfaceHachface Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Also, since it is a scam, and since those scamming assholes tend to fall into groups of scamming assholes, he should probably cancel his card and get a new card issued.

    Even though you said in the OP that it's obvious, I had to lime this advice for "holy-crap-do-this".

    Additionally, cancel all other credit cards used on that computer since the installation of that fake antimalware software, and change all passwords used (particularly banking ones), if you haven't already. Consider reformatting the system, if it's at all possible.

    Not only was that antimalware software fake, there's an extremely good chance it dropped other nasty things on the computer, up to and including trojans and rootkits. Since not everyone buys into the scareware schemes, the douchebags who push these infections tend to steal from folks in other ways, and leave backdoors on systems, too.

    Noted.

    That computer has been nuked from orbit entirely. They have a whole new system now.

  • 3drage3drage Registered User
    edited July 2010
    Report the purchase as fraudulent, have them issue a new card/account number and contest the charges. The bank will attempt to contact the company to allow them to dispute, if they cannot locate the company or they don't contest the charges, you will get your money back (depending on your card terms of service of course)

    Since he made the purchase under false premise, they'll give him a refund immediately and make the refund permanent after they investigate further.

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