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Let's Study the Man-Child

emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
edited September 2010 in Debate and/or Discourse
Man-children. Adult males who are emotionally underdeveloped, lazy, and unable to function when it comes to making grown-up decisions. Some variations are chubby, poorly groomed, dim-witted, selfish, bad with money, and unlucky with love. In short, you don't want to be described as a man-child because a man-child is a pathetic-yet-somehow-lovable/pitiable creature.
Spoiler:

It's my feeling that the man-child has become a stereotype applied to guys in their late twenties and thirties. It's not by any means a crippling stereotype but, for some reason, the grown man reading comic books or playing tabletop games is seen as less than masculine. Why is having an action figure collection considered a girl repellent? How often do women feel they have the chore of training their husbands? Do any self-described man-children have a juicy stories of irresponsibility to share?

emnmnme on
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Posts

  • OremLKOremLK Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    TV commercials are terrible about this. Apparently all dads/husbands are lovable bumbling incompetents, while all mothers/wives are smart, savvy, and constantly cleaning up after their husbands' messes.

    currently playing LoL: Polymath
    a fading melody - my indie platformer for the xbox 360
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

  • FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    As far as the bumbing, useless husband stereotype goes, the real point is that they need that savvy loving wife figure - that's pretty much a direct ploy to appeal to the target demographic. I don't view it as anything else other than a marketing gimmick. Yes it's seen as harmless, and yes if you applied it elsewhere it would probably offend...

    For the other man-child image... I think it's seen as the natural progression for the teenage nerd, now that being a "nerd" is no longer seen as a phase that people grow out of. As far as it being less masculine... My interpretation is that it bumps up against the societal norm of the age where men "traditionally" accept other responsibilities and leave childish things behind. the tension is friction between those two things - as we all know, people can't conform to more than one stereotype. Otherwise, how would we pidgeon-hole them?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • nstfnstf __BANNED USERS
    edited August 2010
    I think being in debt is part of adult hood, at least for a bit. Student loans, credit cards, yeah...

    Outside of that the bumbling husband sells. And as stated, people are no longer scared about being a nerd.

    I've been told that my apartment looks like a kids bedroom before. Gaming systems, multiple TV's, computers, servers, ect. Posters all over the place, skateboards/inlineskates/snowboard on the walls. Action figures in places. Giant bean bags. So women do say grow up, others think it's cute or kinda cool.

    At the end of the day screw it. If it makes me a man-child, so be it. I'll wear the title proudly.

  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Man-children are the best. People who actually say "grow up" are almost always tragically wrong in the worst possible way. Oddly, C.S Lewis said it best:
    Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

    obF2Wuw.png
  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    To a certain extent, it's a matter of degree, and it's a matter of responsibilities. Playing video games for an hour or two when you get home from work to unwind? no big deal, not man-childish. Playing WoW or MW2 until 4:00 am when you have to be at work at 9:00 am night after night? Will probably affect your performance at work, and more than likely man-childish. Only have to support yourself? Sure, spend a little frivolously on games, clothes, car, whatever. Have a wife & kids that depend on you? You better not buy Halo:Reach on launch day if you're stretched thin financially, and you better not spend all your time at home in your man cave rather than with your family.

    There are a lot of other angles to look at it from, though. The importance of a "traditional" life course (getting married, raising kids, etc), selfishness vs. responsibility (and responsibility to whom? family? community? society?)...

    Then there's the part where a lot of the hubbub about Man-Children are coming from the older generations, the same people who bagged on Gen Xers for being slackers in the early 90's (you know, Generation X, the generation that made the internet boom happen)... so how much of it is just the same old "get off my lawn" rhetoric?

    But also, a lot of the younger generation took a look at their parents, saw them work at a crappy jobs their whole lives, watched their bosses and businesses crap on them over and over again, and have decided to take a different route through life.

    This is an interesting topic to me; something I've been reflecting about in my own life recently... I'm curious to hear y'alls take.

  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Man-children are the best. People who actually say "grow up" are almost always tragically wrong in the worst possible way. Oddly, C.S Lewis said it best:
    Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

    I don't know if C.S. Lews is the best guy to be talking about manhood and maturity.

    sig.jpg
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Preacher wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

    allstate.jpg

    sig.jpg
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I don't know if C.S. Lews is the best guy to be talking about manhood and maturity.

    Hence the "oddly"

    obF2Wuw.png
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.

  • BubbaTBubbaT Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Preacher wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

    allstate.jpg

    Slogan isn't nearly stereotypical enough.

    Allstate: You'd better have insurance because the Mexican who crashes into you won't.

  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

    allstate.jpg

    Slogan isn't nearly stereotypical enough.

    Allstate: You'd better have insurance because the Mexican who crashes into you won't.

    Hey I'm at work, take it or leave it

    sig.jpg
  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    sig.jpg
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    I don't have to demand it, society does that for me.

  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    I don't have to demand it, society does that for me.

    That society demands something is no measure of its justification. Society has demanded a lot of bullshit things over the years.

    sig.jpg
  • firewaterwordfirewaterword Tighter than R. Kelly in his teens. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    OremLK wrote: »
    TV commercials are terrible about this. Apparently all dads/husbands are lovable bumbling incompetents, while all mothers/wives are smart, savvy, and constantly cleaning up after their husbands' messes.

    I love the infomercials that depict everyone ever as being awful at the most mundane tasks.

    "Can't strain pasta without boiling the flesh off of your hands? We've got a solution!"

    PSN: TheMakersMark
  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    OremLK wrote: »
    TV commercials are terrible about this. Apparently all dads/husbands are lovable bumbling incompetents, while all mothers/wives are smart, savvy, and constantly cleaning up after their husbands' messes.

    I love the infomercials that depict everyone ever as being awful at the most mundane tasks.

    "Can't strain pasta without boiling the flesh off of your hands? We've got a solution!"

    Go on......

    sig.jpg
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    I don't have to demand it, society does that for me.

    That society demands something is no measure of its justification. Society has demanded a lot of bullshit things over the years.

    I don't think that being a better person than a narcissistic slob with stunted social skills is a horrible societal demand.

  • taoist drunktaoist drunk Registered User
    edited August 2010
    OremLK wrote: »
    TV commercials are terrible about this. Apparently all dads/husbands are lovable bumbling incompetents, while all mothers/wives are smart, savvy, and constantly cleaning up after their husbands' messes.

    I love the infomercials that depict everyone ever as being awful at the most mundane tasks.

    "Can't strain pasta without boiling the flesh off of your hands? We've got a solution!"

    Is your sandwich making you angry?

  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    I don't have to demand it, society does that for me.

    That society demands something is no measure of its justification. Society has demanded a lot of bullshit things over the years.

    I don't think that being a better person than a narcissistic slob with stunted social skills is a horrible societal demand.

    Yet the discussion had been largely revolving around wearing cat ears on a bus.

    sig.jpg
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    When I hear manchild, I don't think bumbling husband or guy that has comic books, I think of my roommate, who although means well, is so narcissistic and irresponsible that he would leave his dog locked in his room for a week at a time, put shot glasses down the garbage disposal, and have 30 to 40 people over on weekends. That is a manchild. It is also proven that many manchildren are frat bros, business majors, or engineering majors in their spare time (note a GPA of 1.2 is probably the norm). Then again, I go to a major university that will let the functionally retarded in, so that might be the problem.

    39kEWYh.jpg
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    I have a friend I would call a man-child. He's almost forty, collects action figures, has almost no furniture in his house despite making good money, is chubby and pudgy, and has atrocious facial hair. He also complains non-stop about not being able to find a nice girl to date, and has never been married or had children.


    In instances like his, I think "man-child" is an apt descriptor because it describes a person who has the self-awareness of a small child. A child, uncaring what the world thinks of him, will wear a cape and Superman shirt outside. The man-child will, too.



    In a weird way, it also reminds me of a lot of single black women friends and co-workers I know who constantly complain about how there are no nice guys out there. But by "nice," they mean "30 year old black guy who is 6'5", super-athletic, makes at least $250,000, has no criminal record, drives a nice car, can dance well, pays for everything, buys her frequent gifts, goes to church, and loves his mother."

    Man-children will lament their frequent dearth of mates as well, but when they say "why can't I meet a nice girl?," "nice" takes the definition of "accept me for the introverted, over-weight, obsessive, niche-interest, toy-collecting, cartoon t-shirt wearing, poorly hygeined, unstylish troll I want to be, while also being impossibly attractive and taking care of me like my mother does."

    Like i've said before, demanding to be completely accepted as you are is just narcissism.
    And demanding people fit into your mold of normal or hating on people outside of said mold is just douche baggery.

    I don't have to demand it, society does that for me.

    That society demands something is no measure of its justification. Society has demanded a lot of bullshit things over the years.

    I don't think that being a better person than a narcissistic slob with stunted social skills is a horrible societal demand.

    Yet the discussion had been largely revolving around wearing cat ears on a bus.

    It's the best example someone could come up with at the time and you know people on the internet; once the bite is clamped down, you can't get it off.

  • override367override367 Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Man-children are the best. People who actually say "grow up" are almost always tragically wrong in the worst possible way. Oddly, C.S Lewis said it best:
    Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

    I agree, take a teenager: they're too afraid of looking childish to touch something that looks childish.

    This is why teenagers rejected Zelda on the gamecube, generally won't touch a Lego game, etc.

    XBLIVE: Biggestoverride
    League of Legends: override367
  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    There seem to be two competing definitions of manchild going around. The apathetic slob who hasn't changed his habits since he was a teenager and now lives in filth because mom isn't around to clean up, and the guy who dresses up for the release of Star Wars or Harry Potter.

    One of these is okay, the other is decidedly not. Conflating the two is pretty disgusting but pretty common. Not that there isn't some crossover.

  • HavelockHavelock Registered User
    edited August 2010
    OremLK wrote: »
    TV commercials are terrible about this. Apparently all dads/husbands are lovable bumbling incompetents, while all mothers/wives are smart, savvy, and constantly cleaning up after their husbands' messes.

    I love the infomercials that depict everyone ever as being awful at the most mundane tasks.

    "Can't strain pasta without boiling the flesh off of your hands? We've got a solution!"


    Heh, yes.

    Among the favorites of mine would be the one that shows a housewife wielding a butcher knife like cudgel for slicing a tomato, and another with a guy ineffectually trying to unscrew a lid off a jar and spilling the contents in an explosive mess.

    It's about as bad as the Carl's Jr. ad showing men to be utter morons in situations that don't involve cars, sports, and beer.

  • BubbaTBubbaT Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    When I hear manchild, I don't think bumbling husband or guy that has comic books, I think of my roommate, who although means well, is so narcissistic and irresponsible that he would leave his dog locked in his room for a week at a time, put shot glasses down the garbage disposal, and have 30 to 40 people over on weekends. That is a manchild. It is also proven that many manchildren are frat bros, business majors, or engineering majors in their spare time (note a GPA of 1.2 is probably the norm). Then again, I go to a major university that will let the functionally retarded in, so that might be the problem.

    I thought of Lebron James in high school.

    Alternatively, Billy Batson/Captain Marvel.

  • jeddy leejeddy lee Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I don't know. I am pretty upfront nerdy, and even among my jock friends, my coworkers, my supervisors, and everyone else it's just seen as one more hobby. I think through exposure to it and seeing how I don't make a big thing about it, or hide it, that the nerdy aspects of my life are just like any other hobby, except probably more interesting.

    What man-boy means to me is the irresponsible stuff. Man boy is not defined by the specific hobby, more about just not being able to let go of things, and realize it's not socially acceptable to be a fanatic about anything, like comics or sports or anything. Also sacraficing getting ahead in life for your hobbies in very rediculous ways, like being unwilling to work fulltime jobs to play halo, buying x-men toys rather than paying child support, living at your parents rather than getting a real job, buying a brand new car / bike when you can barely afford to feed yourself...

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  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Foul Bachelor Frog comes to mind.

    :?:

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Preacher wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

    allstate.jpg

    I'd honestly picture more of something like the Mayhem commercials..

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtP-S9OS0o0

    But with him hunched over the wheel, barely seeing over the top, and acting like he has no teeth while he talks.

    Seriously. $10 to the ad company in an instant.

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    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Foul Bachelor Frog comes to mind.

    :?:

    Terrible meme that captured my housemates I had when I was 21.

  • ScorchedScorched Registered User
    edited September 2010
    jeddy lee wrote: »
    More about just not being able to let go of things, and realize it's not socially acceptable to be a fanatic about anything, like comics or sports or anything.


    I'm not sure what this means at all. So when I've met my needs (maybe only with part time employment!) of food, rent, and all other legal obligations, it's not OK to be fanatic about something?

    That just seems wrong to me, and a very clear example of why societal demands are in general terrible.

    Note that you seemed to separate responsibility and fanaticism in your above post, so if I took it wrong, apologies and so forth.

  • FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Scorched wrote: »
    jeddy lee wrote: »
    More about just not being able to let go of things, and realize it's not socially acceptable to be a fanatic about anything, like comics or sports or anything.


    I'm not sure what this means at all. So when I've met my needs (maybe only with part time employment!) of food, rent, and all other legal obligations, it's not OK to be fanatic about something?

    That just seems wrong to me, and a very clear example of why societal demands are in general terrible.

    Note that you seemed to separate responsibility and fanaticism in your above post, so if I took it wrong, apologies and so forth.

    Would you be a man-child perchance?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    .... riiight.

    Getting back on track, is the stereotype a problem? Can you see it coloring your judgments of middle-aged men who play with toys? How much did man-child stigma affect the public's perception of Michael Jackson? His reluctance to grow up didn't win him any support from the tabloids.

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  • Cedar BrownCedar Brown Registered User
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Foul Bachelor Frog comes to mind.

    :?:

    This is the gist of it.
    Spoiler:

    It's funny because it's about being a dirty slob and there's a picture of a frog.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    It's a stereotype in the media nobody complains about. That PS3 commercial with the nagging girlfriend sure got a lot of shit, though

    gender equality gooooo

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