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Let's Study the Man-Child

2456735

Posts

  • dlinfinitidlinfiniti Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    could be worse
    512WDSXQ5WL._SS500_.jpg
    ManBat.gif


    or is that better

    AAAAA!!! PLAAAYGUUU!!!!
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    It's a stereotype in the media nobody complains about. That PS3 commercial with the nagging girlfriend sure got a lot of shit, though

    gender equality gooooo

    The description for that banned Verizon commercial I posted earlier says a group called His Side and Glenn Sacks complained hard and got it pulled off the air.

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    .... riiight.

    Getting back on track, is the stereotype a problem? Can you see it coloring your judgments of middle-aged men who play with toys? How much did man-child stigma affect the public's perception of Michael Jackson? His reluctance to grow up didn't win him any support from the tabloids.

    I guess there are a lot worse things one can be, but going to what I said in the gamer thread, a lot of the attributes held by the Man-Child aren't just cute idiosyncrasies, but rather signs of underlying mental illness. Springing immediately to mind are things like OCD, narcissism, and social anxiety disorder. But certainly it shows a particular type of guilelessness that I honestly think most humans are hard-wired genetically to be adverse to. If a person is far outside the culturally-acknowledged norm for behavior yet can't understand why or change that behavior even when it would greatly benefit him or her to do so, there's a certain amount of leeriness that society is going to treat them with.

    And I feel that's quite natural.

  • Hockey JohnstonHockey Johnston Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Manchild, of course, doesn't actually describe an actual thing but a series of qualities that someone else wishes you didn't have.

    That's why you can't think of its opposite. An anti-manchild would be the platonic ideal of adulthood -- rich, stylish, assured. It's just a way of saying 'fuck you' to someone.

  • Cedar BrownCedar Brown Registered User
    edited September 2010
    I like SpongeBob SquarePants.

    Fuck you, society. Fuck you.

  • yalborapyalborap Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I hold a simple view: You're responsible, do your work, keep your house clean, pay your bills, spend some time with any family/friends you actually give a fuck about and/or live with, etc.?

    Do whatever the fuck you want. Hell, you can even shirk some of those things from time to time, long as you make it up after. I'd say keep in mind what is and isn't socially acceptable, but that's just because being able to put on your 'normal face' is a good ability for those who fall outside the norm.

    Now, you're not responsible, your house is significantly below your own cleanliness standards, you're short on cash, you're not spending enough time with the family, etc.? Time to buckle down, dude. Halo and Superman're gonna have to wait until those things are dealt with, at least in amounts that will drain significant money and/or time.

  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I think a lot of the remedy for this is just simple maturity. That's the difference between being a man-child and someone who simply hasn't become a repressed, overly-buttoned down adult.

    Take a video game, for instance. I think you can very easily take down your copy of Super Mario Brothers on the NES, play for a couple of hours and still be no more worthy of the man-child title than someone who's playing a pickup game of basketball or whatever. It's just a leisure activity, and hey, maybe it brings back memories for you.

    The man-child, on the other hand, will react toward this activity like a child does. As in, getting overly upset, neglecting his real responsibilities/relationships in favor of entertainment, getting fanatical or obssessed with the game, getting angry at someone who beats them at the game, or whatever.

    Likewise, I occasionally read children's lit (I'm especially fond of The Giver and A Wrinkle in Time). I don't do this because I'm incapable of reading more complex stuff, but just because some of it is good no matter how old you get.

    I think the most mature way to behave is to act like an 'adult' most of the time, but be willing to let your hair down every once in a while. If you get too stodgy I think people have a tendency to stagnate.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    It's a stereotype in the media nobody complains about. That PS3 commercial with the nagging girlfriend sure got a lot of shit, though

    gender equality gooooo

    The description for that banned Verizon commercial I posted earlier says a group called His Side and Glenn Sacks complained hard and got it pulled off the air.

    I guess it's a start. It's not that the media doesn't care about what people think, it's that people don't care

    which is messed up. it's a stereotype that infiltrated pop culture and is now firmly rooted there, and nobody cares. I'm sure this is the case with tons of other stereotypes.

    JKKaAGp.png
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited September 2010
    I like SpongeBob SquarePants.

    Fuck you, society. Fuck you.

    Cartoons are the best thing. Legos are awesome-sauce. The phrase "awesome-sauce" is awesome-sauce. Gaming is keen, comic books rock, and action figures kick ass.

    There may be a tendency to conflate liking these things with man-childhood, but I think that the general implication is a level of irresponsibility and/or social awkwardness that is pretty much debillitating; the person can't function in society because of his obsession with his toys (or sports, or what have you).

    If you're just using it to describe someone who is perfectly successful in life but likes Star Wars more than you think is acceptable, then you're just the douchey jock in high-school who shouts NERRRD every time you see some kid playing D&D.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited September 2010
    mostly the manchild stereotype revolves around simple irresponsibility

    though also obsessive hobbies are pretty common

    i dunno. i get the impression that most people posting on this board are in their late teens or early 20s

    if you'r 18-24 and haven't really given much thought or care to being "grown up" i don't think it's an especially big deal in this day and age

    but if you're in your mid-30s and resist the notion that you're an adult and should generally act in an adult manner, it's significantly less attractive.

    Wqdwp8l.png
  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I also think a lot of the whole manchild thing is simple self-absorption and egotism. Children are extremely selfish and egotistical, for the most part, because they're still learning exactly how interpersonal relationships, society and what have you work. An actual child might want to wear a t-shirt and shorts to a wedding because they hate dressing up and they don't yet realize that, for whatever reason, we're expected to behave a certain way in certain situations and they just want to do things their own way.

    The manchild continues to hold these sorts of beliefs even though they've long since had time to be properly acculturated, and they just expect the world to conform to the way they want to do things, because they're self-absorbed. We don't judge the kid for it, because he doesn't know better; adulthood is that point when people can reasonably expect you to know better.

  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    mostly the manchild stereotype revolves around simple irresponsibility

    though also obsessive hobbies are pretty common

    i dunno. i get the impression that most people posting on this board are in their late teens or early 20s

    if you'r 18-24 and haven't really given much thought or care to being "grown up" i don't think it's an especially big deal in this day and age

    but if you're in your mid-30s and resist the notion that you're an adult and should generally act in an adult manner, it's significantly less attractive.

    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child."


    I don't really have problems with man-children, except for when they start going on about how hard the dating scene is, which they do routinely.

  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited September 2010
    Duffel wrote: »
    I also think a lot of the whole manchild thing is simple self-absorption and egotism. Children are extremely selfish and egotistical, for the most part, because they're still learning exactly how interpersonal relationships, society and what have you work. An actual child might want to wear a t-shirt and shorts to a wedding because they hate dressing up and they don't yet realize that, for whatever reason, we're expected to behave a certain way in certain situations and they just want to do things their own way.

    The manchild continues to hold these sorts of beliefs even though they've long since had time to be properly acculturated, and they just expect the world to conform to the way they want to do things, because they're self-absorbed.

    exactly

    shorts to the wedding

    twinkies for dinner

    my favorite funny tee-shirt to work

    haters gonna hate

    Wqdwp8l.png
  • Irond WillIrond Will Dragonmaster Cambridge. MASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited September 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    mostly the manchild stereotype revolves around simple irresponsibility

    though also obsessive hobbies are pretty common

    i dunno. i get the impression that most people posting on this board are in their late teens or early 20s

    if you'r 18-24 and haven't really given much thought or care to being "grown up" i don't think it's an especially big deal in this day and age

    but if you're in your mid-30s and resist the notion that you're an adult and should generally act in an adult manner, it's significantly less attractive.

    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child."


    I don't really have problems with man-children, except for when they start going on about how hard the dating scene is, which they do routinely.

    they don't tend to be very good company

    unless, i guess, you need a healer for your wow raid or something

    Wqdwp8l.png
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    mostly the manchild stereotype revolves around simple irresponsibility

    though also obsessive hobbies are pretty common

    i dunno. i get the impression that most people posting on this board are in their late teens or early 20s

    if you'r 18-24 and haven't really given much thought or care to being "grown up" i don't think it's an especially big deal in this day and age

    but if you're in your mid-30s and resist the notion that you're an adult and should generally act in an adult manner, it's significantly less attractive.

    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child."


    I don't really have problems with man-children, except for when they start going on about how hard the dating scene is, which they do routinely.

    they don't tend to be very good company

    unless, i guess, you need a healer for your wow raid or something

    That's why you hide your action figure collection before your girlfriend comes over for a visit. It was a pretty good joke in the movie The 40 Year Old Virgin. The guy had nothing but sealed toys in his apartment. Hoping to impress his lady friend, he secretly moved all of his collectibles out into storage and it turned out his apartment was bare. He owned nothing women would find acceptable.

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    they don't tend to be very good company

    unless, i guess, you need a healer for your wow raid or something

    Well, that's true.

    There are two man-children that I am forced two interact with on a regular basis, but at least one of them (the older one) is tolerable in small doses. If you need to go somewhere, he'll lend his car. If you need to borrow cash, he's got it and isn't a prick about getting back. And he's actually quite passionate about football and hockey; just not as much as he is about Star Trek or G.I. Joe or Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

    The younger one, well, is a waste of precious oxygen. Rude, anti-social, horribly elitist despite being extremely stupid and uneducated, and incapable of engaging in any kind of conversation whatsoever. I've even tried to engage this on the few topics we tangentially share, like games or guitars, but even then he shuts down because his scope is so limited and he actually knows very little about the things he is obsessive about. Here are some conversations we've had:

    Me: "Oh, you play guitar? Cool. I have a bunch of them, but my favorite is my Ibanez hollow-body. It has a nice tone that only hollows can get that's perfect for playing blues. Of course, my Honer spanish nylon is great, too. What do you play?"
    Him: "Oh, I don't know. It's, like, an acoustic I guess. It's black."
    Me: "Oh. What do you like to play?"
    Him: "Just, whatever, you know. Metallica. Daughtry. Hardcore stuff."
    Me: "Oh."

    Me: "Hey, I see that Game Informer on your desk. What games do play?"
    Him: "Card games. Yu-Gi-Oh, Pokemon, Magic:TG. I used to play WOW but it's gay."
    Me: "Oh."

    Me: "What's that thing on your desk? Like, a Voltron or Power Ranger or something?"
    Him: "It's a Gundam. I'm writing a trilogy about it that I'm going to animate on my computer."*
    Me: "Oh."


    *this person, at this point, had already failed out of animation school in the first semester, and now currently lives with his parents. His computer is a Compaq from 2001 running WindowsME.

  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2010
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    tmsig.jpg
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    In other parts of the world, you turn 12, you're now an adult!

    steam_sig.png
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    The excuses are the things that kill me the most.

  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2010
    CH: What a stunning riposte. You don't happen to be wearing shorts, do you?

    tmsig.jpg
  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    In other parts of the world, you turn 12, you're now an adult!

    you're 4

    fuck you, get out of my fucking house you fucking mooch

    JKKaAGp.png
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    What a stunning riposte. You don't happen to be wearing shorts, do you?

    Pfft, my wardrobe is worth more then my car.

    steam_sig.png
  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing

    I agree, but in terms of interests and behavior, it's not too uncommon to see a college kid have interests similar (but more mature expressions of) those of themselves at 14-18.


    But as for the rest, you're right. I think the commonality of this phenomenon is partly due to the way that generation of parents were raised, in where conformity and professional duty was beaten into you from a very young age. There's a lot of positive things to be said for that, as it instills maturity and work ethic into people at a young age, but it also has a lot of negative trappings, such as making people very consumerist and viewing success in material terms, as well as insinuating a person's social and sexual value at a very young age.

    Like, my grandfather was an "adult" at the age of 20, having served in war, fathered a child, and entered the career that he would have for the rest of his life. That was the normal standard back then, but it's not what I would consider a healthy goal for people today.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    In other parts of the world, you turn 12, you're now an adult!

    you're 4

    fuck you, get out of my fucking house you fucking mooch

    You are now three years old. This, here, is you puppy! You will raise your puppy! When you turn 4, you'll kill your puppy and use its fur to make shoes and gloves! Then you'll go out into the world and you'll either live or DIE!

    steam_sig.png
  • CorehealerCorehealer The Nevas Sing for me, and I shall sing for you the song that ends the world.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    This thread really is the study of the man child! Demonstration by example. Genius.

    I seriously thought this thread was about that guy who gave birth a couple months ago, guess not. This is still riveting, please continue.

    fLl2cwm.jpg
  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I agree, but in terms of interests and behavior, it's not too uncommon to see a college kid have interests similar (but more mature expressions of) those of themselves at 14-18.


    But as for the rest, you're right. I think the commonality of this phenomenon is partly due to the way that generation of parents were raised, in where conformity and professional duty was beaten into you from a very young age. There's a lot of positive things to be said for that, as it instills maturity and work ethic into people at a young age, but it also has a lot of negative trappings, such as making people very consumerist and viewing success in material terms, as well as insinuating a person's social and sexual value at a very young age.

    Like, my grandfather was an "adult" at the age of 20, having served in war, fathered a child, and entered the career that he would have for the rest of his life. That was the normal standard back then, but it's not what I would consider a healthy goal for people today.
    Personally, I don't think it's too harmful to put off really serious career/relationship stuff until at least 22/23. Up until that age people are still changing so much; I know I was. But not too long after that your personality crystallizes a lot more, and long-term stuff becomes more workable.

    There are often times when I wish I was out of school and just was working toward some concrete goal at a job, but I'm glad I didn't make those decisions when I was 19-20. God only knows what I would have done, but I'd probably hate it by now.

  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    BubbaT wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    It is funny that male stereotypes in marketing is universal, but I've yet to see one all state ad that starts with "Asians are out there driving, do you have allstate?"

    I'd pay $10 to see that ad made.

    My follow up would be an old man behind the wheel looking about to die, and then a simple text at the end.

    "Allstate?"

    allstate.jpg

    Slogan isn't nearly stereotypical enough.

    Allstate: You'd better have insurance because the Mexican who crashes into you won't.

    An uninsured Mexican-American actually did crash into my brand new vehicle (the eponymous Jeep of the Jeepguy). Destroyed the passenger side door completely. Would have totaled anything short of a brand new vehicle.

    I'll just sit back now and let the collective forum consciousness rage about how horribly racist I am for being in the way of that guy and/or noticing he happened to be Mexican and/or daring to speak of it later.

  • EmperorSethEmperorSeth Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Irond Will wrote: »
    they don't tend to be very good company

    unless, i guess, you need a healer for your wow raid or something

    Well, that's true.

    There are two man-children that I am forced two interact with on a regular basis, but at least one of them (the older one) is tolerable in small doses. If you need to go somewhere, he'll lend his car. If you need to borrow cash, he's got it and isn't a prick about getting back. And he's actually quite passionate about football and hockey; just not as much as he is about Star Trek or G.I. Joe or Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

    The younger one, well, is a waste of precious oxygen. Rude, anti-social, horribly elitist despite being extremely stupid and uneducated, and incapable of engaging in any kind of conversation whatsoever. I've even tried to engage this on the few topics we tangentially share, like games or guitars, but even then he shuts down because his scope is so limited and he actually knows very little about the things he is obsessive about. Here are some conversations we've had:

    Me: "Oh, you play guitar? Cool. I have a bunch of them, but my favorite is my Ibanez hollow-body. It has a nice tone that only hollows can get that's perfect for playing blues. Of course, my Honer spanish nylon is great, too. What do you play?"
    Him: "Oh, I don't know. It's, like, an acoustic I guess. It's black."
    Me: "Oh. What do you like to play?"
    Him: "Just, whatever, you know. Metallica. Daughtry. Hardcore stuff."
    Me: "Oh."

    Me: "Hey, I see that Game Informer on your desk. What games do play?"
    Him: "Card games. Yu-Gi-Oh, Pokemon, Magic:TG. I used to play WOW but it's gay."
    Me: "Oh."

    Me: "What's that thing on your desk? Like, a Voltron or Power Ranger or something?"
    Him: "It's a Gundam. I'm writing a trilogy about it that I'm going to animate on my computer."*
    Me: "Oh."


    *this person, at this point, had already failed out of animation school in the first semester, and now currently lives with his parents. His computer is a Compaq from 2001 running WindowsME.

    What exactly makes the first guy a man-child?

    EmperorSeth.png
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Duffel wrote: »
    I agree, but in terms of interests and behavior, it's not too uncommon to see a college kid have interests similar (but more mature expressions of) those of themselves at 14-18.


    But as for the rest, you're right. I think the commonality of this phenomenon is partly due to the way that generation of parents were raised, in where conformity and professional duty was beaten into you from a very young age. There's a lot of positive things to be said for that, as it instills maturity and work ethic into people at a young age, but it also has a lot of negative trappings, such as making people very consumerist and viewing success in material terms, as well as insinuating a person's social and sexual value at a very young age.

    Like, my grandfather was an "adult" at the age of 20, having served in war, fathered a child, and entered the career that he would have for the rest of his life. That was the normal standard back then, but it's not what I would consider a healthy goal for people today.
    Personally, I don't think it's too harmful to put off really serious career/relationship stuff until at least 22/23. Up until that age people are still changing so much; I know I was. But not too long after that your personality crystallizes a lot more, and long-term stuff becomes more workable.

    There are often times when I wish I was out of school and just was working toward some concrete goal at a job, but I'm glad I didn't make those decisions when I was 19-20. God only knows what I would have done, but I'd probably hate it by now.

    For this reason, I'm always a fan of the idea of people to not go to college right out of High School. I always tell them, 'Work full time for a few years. Get an idea on how it's really like', and of course they all go straight to college. Do you know what's the likely outcome? They drop out of college only to work full time being a receptionist or something along those lines. Only then, they also have a few tens of thousands of dollars in loans to pay off.

    steam_sig.png
  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    @Regina

    If you hadn't felt the urge to spend half your post saying "....not that I'm racist!" no one would have thought anything of it, I imagine.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Kamar wrote: »
    If you hadn't felt the urge to spend half your post saying "....not that I'm racist!" no one would have thought anything of it, I imagine.

    If you have to say 'I'm not racist', then it means that you're racist.

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  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Kamar wrote: »
    @Regina

    If you hadn't felt the urge to spend half your post saying "....not that I'm racist!" no one would have thought anything of it, I imagine.

    Oh I never said I wasn't racist. Everyone is racist to some degree. Everyone who pretends they are totally and utterly race-blind is deluding themselves/others.

  • Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Nobody is race blind. But some people aren't dumb enough to ascribe that guy's poor driving skills to his Mexicanness.

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  • Toxic ToysToxic Toys Braggadocio Open up the trunk, release the mech, Increase the power to the shield to protect, I never hit eject.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    This is fun about 20 something olds.

    I liked the five milestones for being an adult: completing school, leaving home, becoming financially independent, marrying and having a child.

    You hit that and every thing else is gravy. Or not.

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  • jeddy leejeddy lee Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Scorched wrote: »
    jeddy lee wrote: »
    More about just not being able to let go of things, and realize it's not socially acceptable to be a fanatic about anything, like comics or sports or anything.


    I'm not sure what this means at all. So when I've met my needs (maybe only with part time employment!) of food, rent, and all other legal obligations, it's not OK to be fanatic about something?

    That just seems wrong to me, and a very clear example of why societal demands are in general terrible.

    Note that you seemed to separate responsibility and fanaticism in your above post, so if I took it wrong, apologies and so forth.

    I guess when I say fanaticism I mean liking so much that you are willing to sacrifice all other aspects of your life for a hobby. I don't think that's ever socially acceptable.

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  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Nobody is race blind. But some people aren't dumb enough to ascribe that guy's poor driving skills to his Mexicanness.

    It's a good thing I did not do that then.

  • Rear Admiral ChocoRear Admiral Choco Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    Wait a minute. What would you spend your spare cash on other than recreation?

    I mean, after food, home costs, taxes, tuition if applicable, things that need replacing, and any miscellaneous savings you put away, what else is there, really?

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  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The Cat wrote: »
    18-24 isn't so much "man-child" as it is just "child".

    See, no. you turn 18, you're a grownup. doesn't mean you have to run off and get a job at the bank, but I really hate this whole "extended childhood" thing, and I hate how people use college debt and high house prices to excuse people refusing to mentally leave their teen years. The stuff Will mentioned, that whole 'wearing the same clothes you did at 15 even though you're 26 while living with mum, refusing to commit to the partner you've been with for 4 years and spending all your spare cash on recreation', it drives me up the wall. Girls do it, too -they're the ones with half a college degree, $10k in credit card debt, and a 4 nights a week clubbing habit.

    And its not the new normal, either, despite what some people seem to think. Its a sign of fail. Arrested development. You're not a free fucking spirit, you're a sponge and a pain in the ass.

    I don't think the "homer simpson lol"commercials in the op have anything to do with the manchild phenom, though. That's a whole other thing, related to a different stage in people's lives (and, I suspect, an older generation than ours).

    Wait a minute. What would you spend your spare cash on other than recreation?

    I mean, after food, home costs, taxes, tuition if applicable, things that need replacing, and any miscellaneous savings you put away, what else is there, really?

    gawd, you're not a soulless capitalist?

    git out of Amurrica

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  • Rear Admiral ChocoRear Admiral Choco Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I'm genuinely at a loss here!

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  • ShivahnShivahn Eastern coastal temptressRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I'm genuinely at a loss here!

    Savings is the only thing that I could think of. "Spare cash" implies that the necessities are taken care of.

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