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Fencing Practice - Stabbing With Style!

KazakaKazaka Registered User
edited September 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
I went to Fencing practice at my University today. It was the second meeting as far as I know (I missed the first one or it was canceled. Conflicting stories abound).

I am not the most physically active fellow, but I am well acquainted with a little basketballin' here and there, which is why I am asking "Why in Christ's name was this so hard?" All we did was footwork, namely working on stance, advances, retreats, and lunges. Anyone who has had a little experience with the sport probably knows what I'm going to say next - OW OW OUCH, MY FLIPPING THIGHS. We practiced for an hour and my legs are burning like Vido at the end of Zaeed's loyalty mission (ME2). What gives? I've exerted myself over longer periods of time and not had this much soreness afterward.

Also, I gots mad scoliosis dawg, which means holding posture can be kind of annoying. I got corrected a lot on this.

Succinctly Summarized for Scrutiny: Fencing practice is hard, am I a wimp? Also, general "How To Not Suck At Fencing" advice would be stupendous. I intend to actually not suck at a sport for real, so bring the heat.

Kazaka on
... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
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Posts

  • DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    It's just because the stance, footwork, and lunges are using different muscles than you typically do when you're running around a basketball court or whatever. It gets better.

  • Void SlayerVoid Slayer Very Suspicious Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Depending on how often the practices are you might want to ask the instructor about other forms of exercise to strengthen whatever muscles you need. If your practicing every other day this wont be a problem but if its once a week or so you might want to get in supplemental exercises. I thought I was fit before I started judo, combat sports are freakin murder on muscles that aren't used normally in other sports.

    I am also assuming your doctor was consulted about sports and your instructor is aware of your condition.

    He's a superhumanly strong soccer-playing romance novelist possessed of the uncanny powers of an insect. She's a beautiful African-American doctor with her own daytime radio talk show. They fight crime!
  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Daenris wrote: »
    It's just because the stance, footwork, and lunges are using different muscles than you typically do when you're running around a basketball court or whatever. It gets better.

    This. I only got the chance to try fencing for a few weeks and by the end of that I was getting used to it. The only advice I can give is pay attention and follow your instructor's advice. I did learn to do an interesting hop back thrust thing while practicing that seemed to catch people.

    I have no idea how to teach that or even if I could do it now.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    As someone who has fenced for a decent amount of time (6 years or so), that burn is a good thing. It'll pass with time, but if you are really interested in getting good at fencing--tournament level (sectional, divisional, national or even local for that matter) I suggest you start running. Fencing is crazy endurance heavy. Also do a few wind sprints and shuffle steps, squat thrusts, and coordination exercises.

    The shuffle Stepping will help with your thighs being on fire, the sprinting will give you the necessary burst speed to catch your opponent off guard, and the running, other than being generally helpful, will make boutting a whole mess less exhausting.

    As far as footwork goes, practice in front of a mirror, it'll help you see if you're messing up. Always keep your en garde where your heels are at a 90 degree angle, and don't roll your backfoot when you lunge. Keep it flat on the ground. And... some advice my coach gave me when I started coaching at my college, "Learning to fence is like a ladder. If you skip a rung you'll get stuck on it and that'll be the only thing you want to do." So don't do super crazy handwork, the basics are one hundred times better than moving your arms in super intricate handwork that your opponent will just lunge into and get a touch off of.

  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Fencing is very high impact. Basketball isn't light either but it doesn't compare to the lunging you'll be doing while fencing. Only some racquetball sports are higher impact - I also play squash and while it doesn't kill your thighs it does do a number on your joints. For good reason.

    In fencing you have to be light on your toes and heavy on them at the same time. You'll need to dance back quickly, like a mongoose, but when you lunge you're going to have to do so with gusto.

    Since you said you aren't the most physically active fellow, it sounds like your aches are just general pains that will go away with some more activity. You'll be fine after a few practices.

    I should point out that there will be subtle variations in your stance and movement depending on what kind of style you fence. I fence sabre which in my humble opinion is ridiculously fun, but if you're trying foil or epee you'll be doing even more lunging, since it's nothing but thrusts.

    Psh. Sabre is the best.

    StKbT.jpg
  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Thank you for the rapid responses, you lot.

    As for supplemental exercises outside of practice, we will be going at it three times a week, with an additional clinic this weekend on Saturday, which is optional (I will probably be going - like I said, serious, also I think I kinda need it). As such, I will probably be doing a little of what TJFP6 suggested (thanks!) but not a shit ton of it. Also, thanks for mentioning the back foot during lunges, as I was definitely rolling off of it when we were instructed to get some more distance on our lunges.

    I suppose the muscle troubles do stem from the fact that different exertion is in play. Hopefully I grow up in a couple of practices. Void, the condition was discussed, but he just sort of warily told me to take things for a spin and see how it plays out. I don't get pains, but I do end up slacking off keeping my back "straight". It's annoying.

    Thanks again peeps. Further advice is still welcome obviously.

    ... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Kazaka wrote: »
    I was definitely rolling off of it when we were instructed to get some more distance on our lunges.

    They may say to get more distance, but you never really want your knee to go over your foot when you lunge. Also, when you recover, bend your back knee in and then shift your weight onto your backfoot and push up. Really, when you fence more weight should always be on the back heel with your back straight not leaning over. When its not, you start putting crazy pressure on your knees and that, well that starts hurting real quick.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Hey! I can help here. Yay.

    Fencing is actually a really tough sport. It's not natural, it takes forever to learn the basics properly, the competitions can literally take all day, the top ranks are loaded with spoiled crybabies, and the USFA leadership is non-existent even after winning more Olympic medals than ever.

    Anywho...

    Yes, I also recommend doing other stuff to sort of balance your musculature. Fencing is a one-sided sport, so one leg/arm might get bigger than the other if you don't do other stuff. Of course, it's only a big problem for the hardcore. It's not going to be a concern if you just go to practice once or twice a week (although it couldn't hurt). The pain situation is from not using those muscles in this way for prolonged periods of time. You should be sore for a long time after the first practice, but the soreness time should gradually reduce until you're only sore for a few hours after practice. Expect to sweat a lot though, every goddamn time.

    I can try to answer some more questions if you have any.

    Edit: IMHO, the best fencers are essentially athletes first and fencers second.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • BlochWaveBlochWave Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Practicing lunges in the weight room might be a good idea. Like people said, don't let your knee drift out over your toe. I have a friend who tore his meniscus doing fencing. That's in your knee. It sucks.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    ACL tears are huuuuge. So many people have done this. There are schools where the highest % injuries on a varsity team is Fencing, and it's not from teh stabbinz.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited September 2010
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    Hey! I can help here. Yay.

    Fencing is actually a really tough sport. It's not natural, it takes forever to learn the basics properly, the competitions can literally take all day, the top ranks are loaded with spoiled crybabies, and the USFA leadership is non-existent even after winning more Olympic medals than ever.
    Ha, in spite of all this, I retain interest! But seriously...
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    Anywho...

    Yes, I also recommend doing other stuff to sort of balance your musculature. Fencing is a one-sided sport, so one leg/arm might get bigger than the other if you don't do other stuff. Of course, it's only a big problem for the hardcore. It's not going to be a concern if you just go to practice once or twice a week (although it couldn't hurt). The pain situation is from not using those muscles in this way for prolonged periods of time. You should be sore for a long time after the first practice, but the soreness time should gradually reduce until you're only sore for a few hours after practice. Expect to sweat a lot though, every goddamn time.

    I can try to answer some more questions if you have any.

    Edit: IMHO, the best fencers are essentially athletes first and fencers second.
    Thanks for the additional nudge toward more physical activity in general. Admittedly, it can't hurt and this thread is just providing more pushes in what I acknowledge is a better direction for my life anyway.

    Also, this thread spurred me toward more detailed research. I don't know how to choose between the three weapons, or even if I'll get to choose or if it will be chosen for me (it's a club sport, so around here, that means show up, bust your ass, you get to roll with us). Thoughts? Experiences?

    ... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Foil: In my opinion, the most difficult of the three. Its a mix between the physicality of fencing and the mentality of fencing, and requires a ton of finesse. I'm biased in that, of the three I'm most experienced in foil and have spent most of my time with it. Right of way is in play and is determined through both intent to attack and swordsmanship.

    Epee: Its all about staring down your opponent and seeing when someone messes up. Outside of a lot of bouncing up and down there is very little movement and a typical gold medal bout usually gets is something like 5-6 or 9-10. There is no right of way and the double touch.

    Sabre: Its the most strenuous physically, in generally. Fast-paced, hard hitting, and very fun to do. There is much jump lunging. Right of way is confusing and despite having a judging rank in Sabre, I still get confused about all the different angles of intent for attack.

    None of them are boring, except Epee, but Epee can go to hell. But I suggest trying out all the weapons. If you do foil though, you're generally in the clear for Epee because Foil is basically unconventional Epee and by practicing it you'll be quicker than a lot of Epeeists and probably beat most of them in tournaments.

  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Sounds bitchin'. I can't wait to jump in. Probably will gravitate to Foil, as a mental game sounds appealing, as opposed to the twitch/no right of way/double touch fuckery of Epee, but I'll form my own opinion as I go along I wager. Thanks again.

    ... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Yeah, right of way can get confusing.

    I've had fencing coaches scorekeep a match I'm doing (a casual one, I mean), and even they seem to get confused figuring out right-of-way for sabre. It's all a bit by the seat of the pants.

    But I love sabre. I've tried epee, which was...eh. Never tried foil. I probably should.

    StKbT.jpg
  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Epee is way more fun when you just rush your opponent and strong arm them with superior ability. But that stops working about the time you fence anyone who does anything serious with an Epee

  • scrivenerjonesscrivenerjones Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    None of them are boring, except Epee, but Epee can go to hell.

    :arrow:

    OP: all of this advice is basically good. I dont think anyone said "do squats" so I will tell you: do squats. your legs will get freaking HUGE and that is good!

  • An-DAn-D Content Editor RaleighRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    When I coached fencing (foil), one of the things I made kids do were to switch their dominant side for random exercises. It completely throws them off, but they quickly develop an alternate sense of balance (even if actually fencing like that remains awkward) and it helps develop the body equally.

    But fun leg exercises: Wall-Sits, Squats, Fencing Suicides (same as a running suicide but in a fencing stance. Focus on form first, than once your coach things you got that down, work on speed. Take a lunge at each line).

    "Anything with the power to make you laugh over thirty years later isn't a waste of time. I think that's something very close to immortality"
    -Stephen King


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  • RollsavagerRollsavager Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    A lot of good stuff has already been said here, but I thought I'd mention that your posture is also very important. Bending over can create additional target area for your opponent to take advantage of, or it can throw you off-balance as you shift your momentum forward and back. If you're having a lot of trouble, put some time into exercising your abdominal muscles, which will help to stabilize your posture.

    I'll also second the idea that athleticism is hugely important in fencing. Most fencers at my school club simply didn't have the endurance they should have, and as a result I took almost all my points from them on footwork alone. When I went to a new club and picked up an epee just for kicks and giggles, my opponent was fencing faster than I was used to fencing foil. Blew my mind.

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  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I started in foil, then switched to epee because I:

    - wanted to win

    AND

    - be able to sleep at night

    Seriously, if you can remove the goddamn director from the bout, everything becomes much more fair. It's hard enough for the fencers to determine right-of-way in foil/saber, let alone the director. Just forget that shit, fence epee, and fence your opponent alone.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    My fencing coach made us switch sides every once in a while too. You feel kind of silly since you've been using one side the whole time, but it balances you out. Also gives you good perspective on how the "other side" sees things.

    Bad posture does actually give your opponent more target area - you may not realize it, but you're basically giving your whole back away as a target. More experienced fencers will be able to flick their blade right over. I can understand how posture would be hard for the OP though.

    All three weapons are mental games, really. But if you don't want to worry about whether your attack was valid or not because the judge didn't think your parry was strong enough, turning it into a beat attack, then epee is the way to go.

    Also epee bruises you harder than foil.

    I always thought of foil and epee as more precision oriented than sabre.

  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited September 2010
    I guess everyone is quite zealous about their particular weapon of preference.

    ... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    From a directing stand point, Epee is a bunch of liars and cheats who will do literally whatever it takes to make sure the point is there. If not for directors, people would get away with some utterly retarded shit.

    Example: Holding the opponents blade, flicking your own foot as you lunge because without off target you can make even yourself your opponent, and my personal favorite, Rigging the wiring of the blade to add a "button" that you can press in and cause the touch light to go off.

    Outside of blade holding, those only work in Epee because everywhere is target. Fence foil and save yourself alot of time and some headache. Because Refs are going to be bad in whatever blade you fence, its a part of the sport.

  • scrivenerjonesscrivenerjones Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    and my personal favorite, Rigging the wiring of the blade to add a "button" that you can press in and cause the touch light to go off.

    well now you are trying to scare the OP off with shit that nobody actually does IRL, because it would get caught literally in one second at a tournament. unless you mean at your club, in which case sorry you fence with cheaters I guess vOv

  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    and my personal favorite, Rigging the wiring of the blade to add a "button" that you can press in and cause the touch light to go off.

    well now you are trying to scare the OP off with shit that nobody actually does IRL, because it would get caught literally in one second at a tournament. unless you mean at your club, in which case sorry you fence with cheaters I guess vOv

    If it never happened in real life, why was I warned to look out for it when training for my Refereeing certification?

  • scrivenerjonesscrivenerjones Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    don't think I am going to make this thread into a fencing nerd slapfight 8-)

    OP, fence whatever weapon seems cool to you. never mind what haters say, ignore em til they fade away.

  • TheJerkFromPod6TheJerkFromPod6 Registered User
    edited September 2010
    If it came off as me saying don't try Epee, I didn't mean it. However, Be warned that each blade has its quirks and Epee's, as I've said earlier is essentially purely mental. The absence of Off-target brings the match to a point where, in my experience refereeing and fencing Epee, is a lot of bouncing around and staring each other down as well as trying to out fox the referee by trying to show you know more about the rules than they do.

    I may dislike Epee, but I love being a foilist who can wallop Epeeists more. It really depends on what type of fitness you're willing to put into it and where in the world of fencing your strengths lie. If you have excellent speed and footwork and like slashing a dude Sabre may be for you. If you like handwork and have bad footwork or just don't like footwork check out Epee. If you have quick, strong handwork, decent to strong footwork, and like a limited target try foil. But definitely try them all atleast once.

  • An-DAn-D Content Editor RaleighRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    As far as the rigging wires thing goes, it has happened in real life, and you can thank the sneaky Soviets for it (Source). The person that taught me to fence told me about it.

    And, I've tried epee and didn't like it as much as foil. Foil is (like all fencing) really physical, but feels like a lot more of a game of mental-physical chess, working with movement and being in tune with who has right of way and whatnot. A lot more to keep track of and a lot more exciting. Also, I feel like it demands a bit more finesse than the other styles.

    "Anything with the power to make you laugh over thirty years later isn't a waste of time. I think that's something very close to immortality"
    -Stephen King


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  • AntithesisAntithesis Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    If there are small groups of 10-15 people per weapon (so around 40~ total), or even if you're in a larger program, who you fence with makes quite a difference in terms of how much you'll enjoy fencing. If you have a choice between two weapons that attract you equally (say, epee and epee), choose the one with the people that look the best to you. Level of sportsmanship, seriousness, skill, how chill they are- consider these before choosing where you go. And then fence epee.

  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited September 2010
    An-D wrote: »
    As far as the rigging wires thing goes, it has happened in real life, and you can thank the sneaky Soviets for it (Source). The person that taught me to fence told me about it.

    And, I've tried epee and didn't like it as much as foil. Foil is (like all fencing) really physical, but feels like a lot more of a game of mental-physical chess, working with movement and being in tune with who has right of way and whatnot. A lot more to keep track of and a lot more exciting. Also, I feel like it demands a bit more finesse than the other styles.

    This sounds a lot like what I'm looking for, to be honest, but I will still give Sabre a look tomorrow (my RA, who invited me in the first place, fences Sabre).

    And to appease the die-hards, I will give Epee a swing at the clinic on Saturday.

    ... They ate, slept and worked. Some of them found uninteresting partners at work who they married and came home to. Sometimes they would half-heartededly thrust into each other and children were made. They lived a middle class existence until their deaths to heart disease and cancer.
  • TNTrooperTNTrooper Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    and my personal favorite, Rigging the wiring of the blade to add a "button" that you can press in and cause the touch light to go off.

    well now you are trying to scare the OP off with shit that nobody actually does IRL, because it would get caught literally in one second at a tournament. unless you mean at your club, in which case sorry you fence with cheaters I guess vOv

    If it never happened in real life, why was I warned to look out for it when training for my Refereeing certification?

    It happened.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Onishchenko

    Edit: I really need to start checking when I am quoting someone from the bottom of the page :oops:

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  • scrivenerjonesscrivenerjones Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    yeah should have said "nobody actually does it IRL anymore." I think everyone's coach told them about that soviet dude, but if anyone tried it nowadays it would get snap caught and they'd be banned for life so oh well!

  • TavataarTavataar Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    VeritasVR wrote: »

    Seriously, if you can remove the goddamn director from the bout, everything becomes much more fair. It's hard enough for the fencers to determine right-of-way in foil/saber, let alone the director.

    If you ever decide to do any sort of competition, whether it be with your school club or you join the USFA, this is a terrible attitude to have. Are there bad referees (they are no longer called directors) out there? Yes. Do you still need to respect them and learn to keep your cool when they are screwing up your bout? Yes.

    However there are also plenty of good referees who are always happy to answer questions after bouts/tournies, and can help guide you through the fencing world.

    http://www.fencing.net/forums/forum.php Is a very good resource for more fencing discussion and questions. There are a lot of very experienced fencers, referees, and armorers on there.

    -Tavataar
  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Just as an aside, I know plugging P90x is a bit trendy now, but they do a really good job of including a lot of squats and lunges as well as supporting core exercises, if you want to strengthen those muscles a bit in a more controlled environment. Just make sure to follow the directions on foot placement, etc (knee over ankle, etc).

  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever TorontoRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Woo, fencing thread! I really need to get back into this sport.

    I'm going to echo what some others have said: Footwork is the most important thing. Good footwork will trump good bladework 9/10 times, as it means you're faster and can recover balance more quickly. Work those thighs!

    Also,

    Rikushix wrote: »
    Psh. Sabre is the best.


    Oh-so-limed. Sabre is a rollicking party compared to the hum-drum of foil and epee. Slashy-slashy!

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  • TavataarTavataar Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Apogee wrote: »
    Footwork is the most important thing. Good footwork will trump good bladework 9/10 times, as it means you're faster and can recover balance more quickly.!

    Yes and no. Footwork and distance are both extremely critical to being a successful fencer, but you should not get apathetic towards developing good blade work as well.

    I might be fencing someone who has the best footwork ever, but if he cant disengage from my parry, he won't score a single point on me.

    -Tavataar
  • piLpiL Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Someone suggested squats. They were correct. Also maxing on both forward and backwards lunges (or lunge--jump--switch legs--lunge) will help with power, speed, and not feeling like shit after.

    Also quad stretch anecdote. I'm pretty limber and I could never actually stretch my quadriceps during my first year of fencing. After a while, I learned how to do it on the ground (other leg out, stretched leg under you and sort of push your hips up). It allowed me to actually stretch it--I never got a good stretch from pulling it behind me while standing. It's not likely that you have that problem, but in a general sense, if you're going through any of the stretches the instructor has you do and think they're not really doing anything for you, I recommend you find out what the goal of that stretch is, ask for advice on how to properly do it, or find another stretch that'll target the same thing and do it before the group stretching (assuming there's some sort of group stretching--if not, make sure you don't half ass the stretching/warmup!)

  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Apogee wrote: »
    Woo, fencing thread! I really need to get back into this sport.

    I'm going to echo what some others have said: Footwork is the most important thing. Good footwork will trump good bladework 9/10 times, as it means you're faster and can recover balance more quickly. Work those thighs!

    Also,

    Rikushix wrote: »
    Psh. Sabre is the best.


    Oh-so-limed. Sabre is a rollicking party compared to the hum-drum of foil and epee. Slashy-slashy!

    Let's promise to get back into it. I tried at my old university but I didn't have time to practice a lot and the club there was incredibly pretentious :? I'm looking for way to get back into the sport without joining an elite fencing club. Something recreational, but not so casual that it's like a drop-in session at my local community center (which is actually how I started fencing, as a teenager).

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  • GleveGleve Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Squats for the win. Squat lunges will be murder till you get the thigh muscles for this bag

    I'm 6'4", weigh in at 125kg, but have a MASSIVE reach. Even being as unfit as all get out, I was smashing it home in foil and epee.

    Foil - Take the opponents blade. A simple tap on their blade as you are lunging in to strike will take the right of way from your opponent. I made it my go to move, and it rarely let me down.

    Epee - pretty sure someone already said this, but get in close and use strength if you have it. I beat much better opponents than me because I have strong forearm muscles (motorcyclist for the win), allowing me to 'take' their blade, and turn it away from me, as I sneak in past their blade and strike.

    Side note, I picked up a trick accidentally that worked 9 out of 10 times. In fencing, having one hand on the floor is not counted as a fall, so, essentially, I'd drop into a one handed push up (keeping my knees off the ground) and lunge forward from my toes and shoulder with my right arm, completely under my opponents guard. Very sneaky, very effective.

    telcus wrote: »
    !vote for Gleve that was funny that you bandwaggoned yourself mate :)
  • TavataarTavataar Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Gleve wrote: »
    Side note, I picked up a trick accidentally that worked 9 out of 10 times. In fencing, having one hand on the floor is not counted as a fall, so, essentially, I'd drop into a one handed push up (keeping my knees off the ground) and lunge forward from my toes and shoulder with my right arm, completely under my opponents guard. Very sneaky, very effective.

    If you are going to do this:

    1. Make sure you are super in control of your actions or you will be penalized for falling and not score any points that you may have touched.

    2. Make sure that your face is facing forwards at all time or you will be penalized for dropping your head and exposing the back of your neck.

    I definitely think that changing the position of your torso is great to for mixing up your opponent a little bit, whether it is a duck (with your torso, not your head) or shifting from side to side; however you should be aware of how exposed your back is during this maneuver.

    -Tavataar
  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Gleve wrote: »
    Foil - Take the opponents blade. A simple tap on their blade as you are lunging in to strike will take the right of way from your opponent. I made it my go to move, and it rarely let me down.

    I did this a lot too. I had a lot of refs in tournaments call it a beat-attack, and so the point went to my opponent because it didn't count as a parry =(.

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