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IE9 Public Beta now open and it's crazy fast!

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Posts

  • ButtcleftButtcleft Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    already?

    didnt 8 just like comeout not to long ago or have i drastically lost track of time?

    that's it, I'm shutting this entire forum down, everyone thank buttcleft
  • Jubal77Jubal77 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    To microsoft minor revisions are for cowards ;)

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  • AfroJAfroJ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    IE8 was released March '09. I'd say they were due for another release.

    For comparison, Chrome v1 was released in December '08 and they are now on v6.

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  • GrimReaperGrimReaper Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I'll do a sort of repost of what I did on the mozilla forums on this:

    Interesting UI choices in IE9, i'm pretty disappointed in a few things.

    Namely this:

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    Internet options needs a total overhaul, it's a sad joke. I don't think MS have changed this (the basic layout) since something like IE4. It really needs fixing, it's a jungle of options.

    Add ons is still a joke too.

    I can see why they chose to stick the tabs on the right (cleaner ui), but the moment you have more than a handful it becomes unmanageable. I think Mozilla (and Opera) are really the only ones trying new things to try to make it more manageable.

    I've never been fond of having the search function integrated into the url bar because I like to be able to select my search engine with the press of a mouse click, kinda neat that they thought to put the search engine icon at the bottom so you can quickly switch between results. I'd kind of like to see that done in other browsers.

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    Nice to see an improvement on the HTML5Test.com site, but it's still light years behind everyone else.

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    It's also nice that IE9 doesn't freeze up when you resize the window with the FishIE test with 1000 fish. (Cough, cough)

    It's kind of unsurprising that IE9 slightly outperforms Fx4 on the Direct2D stuff, MS can pretty much query the guys who created Direct2D to get optimal performance.

    The current Fx4 nightly beats this on sunspider by about 50ms on my pc whilst the latest Fx4 beta is beaten by about 20ms by the IE9 beta. I've not tested IE9 on Kraken yet though.

    I am kind of disappointed that MS is harking on about HTML5 so much and yet it is getting bitch slapped by all of the other browsers, even mobile browsers for crying out loud..

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  • RandomEngyRandomEngy Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I think the general story from them is that the tests are kind of stupid and don't really represent the features that matter to developers.

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  • ZxerolZxerol The fullest, most luscious beard. Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    They don't get to talk shit about standards compliance after IE6.

    But at least they're trying this time around, even if it was in response to Mozilla and co. bitch slapping IE around.

  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Zxerol wrote: »
    They don't get to talk shit about standards compliance after IE6.

    I can't take anyone says stuff like this seriously. IE6 is just about 10 years old at this point and there were almost no standards around back then. If you're able to remember to battle between IE & Netscape that was more than just what browser you're using. Not to mention that when IE6 came out it was actually good. I've been using IE since v3.
    Zxerol wrote: »
    But at least they're trying this time around, even if it was in response to Mozilla and co. bitch slapping IE around.

    "Bitch slapping" really when IE still has over three times the market share of Firefox. If anything it's Chrome that's the big competitor now.

  • ZxerolZxerol The fullest, most luscious beard. Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    And was their response to IE6's deficiencies when it was clear that it was falling behind, and generally being exposed a crummy, bastard of a browser? They said, that's it, we're not going to develop it anymore, who cares. It's good enough. And it's that attitude which foisted that albatross on the web for years.

    Yes, bitchslapping. IE had practical monopoly on the Windows browser market, and which got whittled away by Microsoft's complacency to about 60% nowadays, a figure that is still dropping. A majority share, sure, but if your ass got knocked out by 30+ percent by a bunch of upstart browsers, then yeah, I consider that to be fucking significant. This is the sort of thing which finally woke them up and fastracked IE back into development with 7, which was still ass but leagues better than 6.

    Chrome wasn't even around when Firefox started chewing off IE's dominance, and it's still like a third of Mozilla's share, but still respectable and fast-growing. Fine enough, it's a great browser.

    Point is, they made a deficient browser, and when it's time to support and grow it in the evolving web ecosystem, Microsoft dropped the ball. They've since shook off that monopolistic complacency, which is a good thing (and 9 honestly does look intriguing to me), but don't tell me they didn't royally screwed the pooch back in the day.

    edit: i'm actually installing this biznitch right now, so let's see how it plays

  • DehumanizedDehumanized Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Yeah, I'll probably run this alongside Chrome... there's definitely some sites I use for work where the tighter AD integration is handy.

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  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Zxerol wrote: »
    And was their response to IE6's deficiencies when it was clear that it was falling behind, and generally being exposed a crummy, bastard of a browser? They said, that's it, we're not going to develop it anymore, who cares. It's good enough. And it's that attitude which foisted that albatross on the web for years.

    Yes, bitchslapping. IE had practical monopoly on the Windows browser market, and which got whittled away by Microsoft's complacency to about 60% nowadays, a figure that is still dropping. A majority share, sure, but if your ass got knocked out by 30+ percent by a bunch of upstart browsers, then yeah, I consider that to be fucking significant. This is the sort of thing which finally woke them up and fastracked IE back into development with 7, which was still ass but leagues better than 6.

    Chrome wasn't even around when Firefox started chewing off IE's dominance, and it's still like a third of Mozilla's share, but still respectable and fast-growing. Fine enough, it's a great browser.

    Point is, they made a deficient browser, and when it's time to support and grow it in the evolving web ecosystem, Microsoft dropped the ball. They've since shook off that monopolistic complacency, which is a good thing (and 9 honestly does look intriguing to me), but don't tell me they didn't royally screwed the pooch back in the day.

    edit: i'm actually installing this biznitch right now, so let's see how it plays

    Yeah and if you wanted all the visitors be able to view the sites with the correct layout you had put in extra develop time for the crummy IE piece of shit. (For example, back then, I had several cases where a css layout worked fine for Firefox and Opera, Safari other Webkit browsers and in IE it was falling appart). Not to mention that there are still sad, sad people who use IE 6 still today. Its like cancer on the web.

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  • GrimReaperGrimReaper Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Also, having to restart after installing IE9.. you'd think by this point they could make it not tied into the OS so much that it requires a fricking restart after installing it. Every other browser on the planet can manage it, why can't IE?

    Also, this is Microsofts idea of tab management:

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    On the javascript tests, there is an obvious bias for certain tests for certain browsers. Google even acknowledges this by naming their test v8bench (their js engine named v8).

    Mozilla has just released their js test suite named Kraken, I trust Mozilla a hell of a lot more to be more impartial in this regard. Their mission has always been to make the web better and not to dominate it.

    Also, HTML5Test is essentially all the stuff that web developers want. It's a simple impartial test to see what a web browser supports that's part of the forming HTML5 spec. Things like web workers, canvas, storage, webgl etc.

    I find it pretty miserable that IE9 fares so badly on that, especially in comparison to browsers that have been released for a while now (Firefox 3.6) or mobile web browsers (like Safari on the iphone/itouch).

    You may think i'm being a bit cruel on MS here, but think about it. How much money and resources does MS have? And this is still the best they can do. I suspect there's some internal struggle going on between divisions about features they should support. There was a news article a bit ago that at MS there's a fight going on between silverlight and IE HTML5 people about features to support so it doesn't eat into silverlights share.

    EDIT:

    From a quick Google search.
    Microsoft watchers are poring over a series of Twitter posts from former Silverlight Product Manager Scott Barnes, a web design and user experience specialist.

    According to Barnes, just back from a week of briefings at Microsoft, there is intense internal debate about the future of HTML 5, newly implemented in the forthcoming Internet Explorer 9, and the Silverlight plug-in. He tweeted:

    “Right now there's a faction war inside Microsoft over HTML5 vs Silverlight. oh and WPF is dead.. i mean..it kind of was..but now.. funeral.”

    WPF is Windows Presentation Foundation, the rich user interface framework that was originally intended to become the primary GUI API for Windows Vista, but was sidelined when Vista development was “reset” in 2004, and does not feature strongly in Windows 7. “There's no-one working on it beyond minor touch-ups,” says Barnes.

    That said, Visual Studio 2010, released earlier this year, makes heavy use of WPF, lending credence to the idea that Microsoft’s Windows team and its Developer division have divergent strategies.

    The big debate now is over Silverlight versus HTML5. Barnes claims that the Windows and IE teams see the revved-up Internet Explorer as the replacement for WPF. Since it has hardware-accelerated video, a fast JavaScript engine and support for the Canvas element for custom graphics, that is plausible. But what about access to the Windows API? No problem, says Barnes:

    “HTML5 is the replacement for WPF.. IE team want to fork the HTML5 spec by bolting on custom windows APi's via JS/HTML5”

    This would be a classic “embrace and extend” strategy, encouraging developers to create Windows-specific HTML 5 applications, though Microsoft risks losing the goodwill IE9 is generating for its support of web standards among people like Opera’s Molly Holzschlag, who said in March that Microsoft’s new browser “will kick butt”.

    If Microsoft does move in this direction it will be a significant shift from the current strategy, which places WPF as the framework for Windows desktop applications, and Silverlight as a subset of WPF suitable for browser-hosted or out-of-browser applications that run cross-platform. That's on Macs as well as Windows at least, though Apple’s exclusion of runtimes like Flash and Silverlight from its device platform is damaging its value. WPF and Silverlight use the same XML-based layout language, called XAML, and support programming in .NET languages.

    Silverlight is also the applications platform for Windows Phone 7, Microsoft’s attempt to get back in the mobile race, which launches later this year.

    Earlier this month, Brad Becker, of Microsoft’s Developer Platforms team, defended the role of Silverlight in a blog post, saying that it remains better for “premium media experiences and apps”. ®

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  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    GrimReaper wrote: »
    Also, having to restart after installing IE9.. you'd think by this point they could make it not tied into the OS so much that it requires a fricking restart after installing it. Every other browser on the planet can manage it, why can't IE?

    Allow me an overly simplified answer. In Win7 IE can be removed/disabled. But IE has a "scripting engine" that is part of the OS that many software developers use.

    Also Silverlight isn't going anywhere. It can easily exist in an HTML5 world. MS just needs to roll out a 64bit version already. I believe Windows has a 64bit version of flash now.

  • DranythDranyth Surf ColoradoRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Zxerol wrote: »
    They don't get to talk shit about standards compliance after IE6.

    I can't take anyone says stuff like this seriously. IE6 is just about 10 years old at this point and there were almost no standards around back then. If you're able to remember to battle between IE & Netscape that was more than just what browser you're using. Not to mention that when IE6 came out it was actually good. I've been using IE since v3.

    Sorry, I just have to clarify this. HTML 4.0 was recommended as a standard by the W3C in December of 1997, CSS 2 was recommended as a standard in May of 1998 (and CSS1 in December 1996.)

    IE6 was released in August 2001, only 2 and a half years after IE 5 was released in March 1999. I can see IE5 not being standards compliant, but considering they probably started working on IE6 *after* the release of IE5 at some point, its a pretty large time frame from when the standards were 'final' to the release of IE6.

    The standards existed, Microsoft chose to ignore the fuck out of them.

  • DraygoDraygo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    When you control the browser market, you sorta think you can write the standards. To microsoft at that time W3C was just a bunch of dudes standing up saying what they think the web standards should be, and microsoft had a different set of ideas at the time.

    Also why are we talking about IE6 anyway, its an old dead horse, and it should stay dead forever. The only thing i'm really disappointed with over IE9 is that they are refusing to make it work on windows XP. Windows XP still has a huge market share of the computers out there - by not supporting XP microsoft stands to lose ground when the web starts using more and more html5.

    Also html5 specification isnt out yet, which means any tests developed for the specification can not be trusted at all because they are based on an unfinished standard. There is a public working draft but there are plenty of things that can be interpreted in multiple ways. Hopefully it will all get fleshed out and a html5 standard formally approved by w3c.

    When the specification is done by the end of this year (hopefully) then I would start believing 'tests' working off that specification. And hopefully Microsoft with their seemingly focus on some standards compliancy will ahere to the standard agreed upon by w3.

  • Jubal77Jubal77 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Just upgrade to Win7 already. It is a solid OS and they will end XP support eventually. They already stopped support of SP2. If I can run Win 7 on my first gen p4 with a gig of ram I am sure alot of the legacy machines can. If not? Well it is high time to upgrade. Computers are cheap now adays. I bought my parents a Phenom 2 box for around 500 bucks that rocks win7.

    As for the IE debate and Firefox bitchslapping them. Didnt they not break 10% market share until a few years ago? Hardly eating away at IE. I am not an IE fan by any means but to state that any of the OS products have had impacts on Microsoft Market share until recently is just absurd. Netscape was the closest thing back in those days and I would just have preferred them to go away at that time as programming for two different systems sucked bad back then. And call me insane I preferred programming for IE.

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  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I couldn't get this since for what ever reason my vista 64 doesn't think I need sp2, and ie9 says my sp isn't supported.

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  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I really, really hate the position of the address bar. A true tabs-on-top (a la Chrome, I think Opera, and FF4) would work so much better. It bugs me that I can't move it.

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  • DranythDranyth Surf ColoradoRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Draygo wrote: »
    When you control the browser market, you sorta think you can write the standards. To microsoft at that time W3C was just a bunch of dudes standing up saying what they think the web standards should be, and microsoft had a different set of ideas at the time.

    Also why are we talking about IE6 anyway, its an old dead horse, and it should stay dead forever. The only thing i'm really disappointed with over IE9 is that they are refusing to make it work on windows XP. Windows XP still has a huge market share of the computers out there - by not supporting XP microsoft stands to lose ground when the web starts using more and more html5.

    Also html5 specification isnt out yet, which means any tests developed for the specification can not be trusted at all because they are based on an unfinished standard. There is a public working draft but there are plenty of things that can be interpreted in multiple ways. Hopefully it will all get fleshed out and a html5 standard formally approved by w3c.

    When the specification is done by the end of this year (hopefully) then I would start believing 'tests' working off that specification. And hopefully Microsoft with their seemingly focus on some standards compliancy will ahere to the standard agreed upon by w3.

    We're talking about IE6 because we *wish* it was an old dead horse. The fucking thing has been very very slowly dying, but it isn't dead yet and it's the bane of web developers almost everywhere.

    At any rate, they aren't 'refusing to make it work on XP', it *won't* work on XP. I believe it's because of the graphics acceleration which must use the new desktop capabilities introduced in Vista. I'm assuming that the graphics acceleration is so integral to the browser's performance that they can't just 'cut it out for XP'.


    I wouldn't worry about the HTML5 spec not being 'final' yet, it's in a solid enough state at this point. CSS3 isn't final either, but that hasn't stopped browser makers from implementing various features.

  • GrimReaperGrimReaper Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Just read an interesting thing, apparently in the latest dev build of Chrome it has gpu acceleration working on XP. So all those fancy Direct2D stuff on the IE9 site work great on XP if you use Chrome. I think Firefox is doing the same only you have to go into about:config to enable it. (I think)

    EDIT: Also, why is it so hard for everyone but Mozilla to do a decent bookmark/favourites system? Firefox's bookmark system is fricking awesome, why don't the others just lift it. I'm surprised Google hasn't just used the code for it, chunks of Chrome are from not only webkit but from Firefox too.

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  • DranythDranyth Surf ColoradoRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    To clarify, I'm not saying that graphics acceleration itself *can't* work on XP, I'm saying that the way Microsoft is doing it, by specifically leveraging the graphics system as Vista/7 handle it, can't work on XP, because it doesn't exist.

    Doing it any other way I imagine involves completely writing your own implementation of graphics acceleration, which wouldn't be as nearly tied into how the XP (and older) desktop works.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I really don't care about IE9 at all, because I use Firefox and Chrome and only open IE in the acceptionally rare case where I need it for AD integration....

    But people who think IE6 is dead haven't done any web development. We did a web project earlier this year where the first pass did not have specific tweaks and fixes in-place for IE6 (specifically a lot of the CSS hacks that are required to do full CSS layouts in IE6); It was a disaster. The customer had people screaming they couldn't use the app because they were still on IE6. This is in 2010. We had to go back and put in an IE6 compliant layout.

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  • amnesiasoftamnesiasoft Thick Creamy Furry Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    It doesn't work on XP because it uses Direct2D. Direct2D is not supported on XP.

    And really, the sooner both XP and IE6 die, the better.

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  • DranythDranyth Surf ColoradoRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I do web development, which is why I know IE6 isn't dead. Luckily I don't actually develop *for* IE6, though I do need to be better about making my sites degrade more gracefully.

    Quite frankly, you are *not* getting a site that appears virtually the same in standards browsers *and* IE6, fuck you. It's annoying enough to get a site appearing virtually the same in standards browsers and IE7.

    If you insist on using a nearly 10 year old browser in 2010, all I intend to make sure is that you are able to get the same *content* in an accessible manner, that's it.


    That said, I do have a sub-site right now that doesn't degrade correctly in IE6, because even though the columned CSS layout I'm using *does* work well in IE6, the modifications I had to make to it apparently broke the backwards compatibility. I'm not terribly worried about it at the moment however as the entire website is getting a complete overhaul fairly soon anyway.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dranyth wrote: »
    I do web development, which is why I know IE6 isn't dead. Luckily I don't actually develop *for* IE6, though I do need to be better about making my sites degrade more gracefully.

    Quite frankly, you are *not* getting a site that appears virtually the same in standards browsers *and* IE6, fuck you. It's annoying enough to get a site appearing virtually the same in standards browsers and IE7.

    If you insist on using a nearly 10 year old browser in 2010, all I intend to make sure is that you are able to get the same *content* in an accessible manner, that's it.


    That said, I do have a sub-site right now that doesn't degrade correctly in IE6, because even though the columned CSS layout I'm using *does* work well in IE6, the modifications I had to make to it apparently broke the backwards compatibility. I'm not terribly worried about it at the moment however as the entire website is getting a complete overhaul fairly soon anyway.

    The IE6 version of our project is about 75% feature complete compared to the "modern standards" version, and there isn't a damn thing we can do about it, because IE6 is so fucking broken. We had to make work what we could make work and deal with the rest.

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  • GrimReaperGrimReaper Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    We don't test any of our web stuff in IE6 any more, any and all testing is current stable versions of web browsers only. Gotta say, it's been pretty fine. That said, I work at a print company so the web stuff is mostly along the lines of stock management, ordering stock, custom print stuff (think time tables, business cards) and being able to query delivery status.

    Since we're just a print company and not a dedicated online only type place we don't really have to focus as much on backwards compatibility with older browsers.

    In other words, fuck IE6.

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  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    The IE6 version of our project is about 75% feature complete compared to the "modern standards" version, and there isn't a damn thing we can do about it, because IE6 is so fucking broken. We had to make work what we could make work and deal with the rest.
    Are we doing "web developer hell" stories now? 'Cause I got one. Although not a developer on any level, I did once have a dev team across the cubicle farm...
    Their brief was basically: Take this old desktop app built with Delphi 6 for Win2K, that hasn't had more than cursory maintenance in three years and whose original developer left the company before that, taking whatever notes he may have made with him, and turn it into a full-featured web(-only) app.
    Somehow, they manage to get a sellable framework together in about two years which, considering they were essentially starting from scratch and didn't have an interface guy, was near-miraculous.

    Then after another year of fixes, several poorly conceived and largely undefined feature additions (dropped from a great height of course), and finally hiring a beta-tester (singular, part time), they (all six of them) had to explain to the crazy boss why their big government contract (negotiated entirely over their heads) was taking so long to implement, and why couldn't they just make it work in IE6?

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  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Uee Citizen Record #2051 Über Star CitizenRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    fuck ie 6

    /me leaves

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  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Are we doing "web developer hell" stories now? 'Cause I got one. Although not a developer on any level, I did once have a dev team across the cubicle farm...
    Their brief was basically: Take this old desktop app built with Delphi 6 for Win2K, that hasn't had more than cursory maintenance in three years and whose original developer left the company before that, taking whatever notes he may have made with him, and turn it into a full-featured web(-only) app.
    Somehow, they manage to get a sellable framework together in about two years which, considering they were essentially starting from scratch and didn't have an interface guy, was near-miraculous.

    Yeah, the missmanagement of IT projects / small sized enterprises is often outstanding. There are no documentations, or insufficient documentation, no backup of important files. Except ones which are out of date or are residing on the "live server". The project(s) are mostly maintained and supervised by one guy (most likley "Bob" which is required to put these together on a non-busy day, or in his break time) - and if he leaves / dies / quits / is fired there is no easy way to maintain or continue develop the project he/she worked on.

    My situation nearly 5 years ago was that I was a trainee (in Germany you are required to work for a certain timespan to get a official certificate in a job - which is a good excuse for enterprises to pay you next to nothing and add tasks to your shedule you are not supposed to do. [sarcasm] Because, yeah, you are the "IT-guy" this means besides maintaining the machines, you are able to write complex custom IT and web-applications - for any field and platform of course. [/sarcasm]). So it was my task to "polish" the fucked-up small coperate website. Basically I had to tear it down completely (argh, hideous 1996ara animated gifs and background music), extract the "shop portion", rescue the database and build a new site from scratch and import the data. Of course, it should "stand out". - So I wasn't allowed just to use the default look of a current GNU php content management system - nooo - I had add to add a custom design too. And boy had I fun with IE6 and its horrible broken standards and display modes.

    I still have nightmares about Internet Explorer 6 trying to show me something, but it is all warped and messed up and about a Fox on fire trying to fetch data but returning with an empty site.

    Having worked in cutomer support, I know that there are _still_ lots of people running unpatched Windows XP. At least in Vista and Win updates are enabled by default and the system is usually pretty unobstrusive about updating the OS and browser - dunno if it silently updates the browser version, though.

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  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    So after 4 attempts to install ie 9 beta on my machine and 4 failures with the installer hanging at the same spot. I am done with it, maybe the final version will actually install on my machine.

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  • ButtcleftButtcleft Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    TheUnsane1 wrote: »
    So after 4 attempts to install ie 9 beta on my machine and 4 failures with the installer hanging at the same spot. I am done with it, maybe the final version will actually install on my machine.

    are you on XP?

    that's it, I'm shutting this entire forum down, everyone thank buttcleft
  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    No Vista 64. At first it was telling me I didn't have the right service pack but really it was because i had language packs installed for no reason in particular. Now the installer gets to about 30% in and sits forever. Killing the installer from that point causes my system to chug until I reboot also. In case you are looking for system specs too I am running an AMD Phenom 9850, 4gb of ram, and a hd 3800 video card.

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  • ButtcleftButtcleft Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    TheUnsane1 wrote: »
    No Vista 64. At first it was telling me I didn't have the right service pack but really it was because i had language packs installed for no reason in particular. Now the installer gets to about 30% in and sits forever. Killing the installer from that point causes my system to chug until I reboot also. In case you are looking for system specs too I am running an AMD Phenom 9850, 4gb of ram, and a hd 3800 video card.

    did you get the service pack from windows update or did you download the installer and install it that way/make a slipstreamed install disk?

    I had issues on XP with IE8 not installing right because I downloaded SP2 to make a slipstream and there was some bug with that variant but not the windows update variant.

    Might be similar here?

    that's it, I'm shutting this entire forum down, everyone thank buttcleft
  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I got the service pack from windows update.

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  • ButtcleftButtcleft Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    TheUnsane1 wrote: »
    I got the service pack from windows update.

    Well my helpful usefulness is at a end, then :D

    that's it, I'm shutting this entire forum down, everyone thank buttcleft
  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Thanks for trying, it's frustrating since I generally like IE better since it seems more stable over time. (I tend to get weird hangs in firefox after about 6 months of running it in just about every version I have ever used.)

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  • GMaster7GMaster7 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Hm. So I'm a big IE fanboy and I really want to love IE9, but I'm having some problems with a few sites. Yahoo! Fantasy Sports, specifically, and I just noticed that the Club Nintendo website is doing the same thing. In Yahoo Sports, when I try to click the little yellow post-it messages to get the news about my players, nothing happens - I have to right click and open in a new window. Club Nintendo I can't log in to... I enter my info, hit Login, and nothing happens. Is this a Javascript problem, or what? I can't find anything about these problems anywhere on the web.

    PSN: SKI2000G | Steam: GMaster7 | Battle.Net: GMaster7#1842 | Twitch: twitch.tv/SKI2000G
    Instructions for joining Pax Arcadia & Pax Arcadia II are in the Destiny OP!
  • TheUnsane1TheUnsane1 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Sounds like script blocking maybe.

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  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    @GMaster7, try running those sites in compatibility mode.

    I like most of IE9, I'm not liking the new UI so much. IE8 had the best tab controls of any browser when it was released and now they took a step backwards.

  • GMaster7GMaster7 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Thanks for the suggestion, Dark Shroud! I don't know why I didn't think of that. It solved the Yahoo! Sports problem... Club Nintendo still doesn't do anything when I click Login, though. Hm. Hopefully Microsoft remedies whatever's causing the problem, or Nintendo updates the site for the browser, or... I dunno. Thanks for your help, though!

    PSN: SKI2000G | Steam: GMaster7 | Battle.Net: GMaster7#1842 | Twitch: twitch.tv/SKI2000G
    Instructions for joining Pax Arcadia & Pax Arcadia II are in the Destiny OP!
  • Lucky CynicLucky Cynic Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I am going to be giving IE9 a try on my uber Windows 7-64 PC. I haven't toyed with IE since 7? 8? Anyhow, I am very picky when it comes to new software and browsers especially so we will have to see.

    My pre-requisites for bumping out Chrome from its throne:

    + Must be safe. I practice safe browsing but still, I'd rather not have it hi-jacked with toolbars and shit like previous IEs, which I think is a non-issue this time around.

    + The UI must be nice to see in action. I really like how the tabs can be torn and placed around with Chrome and I love how it is essentially 3 bars. The top bar w/ tabs and the minimize, window, and close button; the address bar, and then bookmarks. I am intrigued with the taskbar features though!

    + Also, it must not be totally broken. If pages just simply do not render right, then what is the point? And I am not talking about super cutting edge pretentious HTML5 bullshit. If photobucket suddenly isn't accepting uploads, or if google is broken, then it needs time to polish out.

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