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2010 Midterm Elections, or: Barnum Was Right

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Posts

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Fact: This sentence is a lie.

  • citizen059citizen059 on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeamRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Xeddicus wrote: »
    Is the entire 'story' about Christine Odonell that she didn't have sex with some guy at some party 3 years ago? Or is there actually something damning involved? She doesn't seem to have a chance in hell, so why are they spinning a non-story like this?

    Mostly because the behavior mentioned in the story is completely opposite of the way she portrays herself as a person and a candidate - even if they didn't have sex. She tries to come off as a strictly religious moral person, but in reality she's as human as any of us.

    That said, it is kinda one of those non-story things. I don't care if she got drunk and naked in some dude's bed. Hey, if it had been me at that age I wouldn't have kicked her out either. Crazy, yeah, but she ain't bad lookin' either.

    But then, I had a habit of hooking up with the crazy ones. Took me a while to figure out it wasn't worth all the drama.

    And I'm not sure I would've posted about it "anonymously" on the internets years later when she was running for public office, because in the modern world of web-tubes, there is no such thing as "anonymous".

  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2010
    Couscous wrote: »
    Fact: This sentence is a lie.

    My head just asploded!

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • KastanjKastanj __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2010
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Someone hook me up with the I voted avatar. Going to need it this afternoon.

    (unless I make one out of the GA peach)

  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    fart on their heads

    alternatively I could just wear a beret and leather jacket. People already cross the street when I'm walking around, they'd flip their shit if they thought I was an honest-to-goodness Black Panther.

    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2010
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    That's kinda tricky. You know what happens to people who oppose Sheriff Joe.

    I would not be surprised in the slightest if deputies happened to inspect ballots while shaking someone down in the polling location.

    MKR wrote: »
    Someone hook me up with the I voted avatar. Going to need it this afternoon.

    (unless I make one out of the GA peach)
    Just right click save as on someone's avatar.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    That's kinda tricky. You know what happens to people who oppose Sheriff Joe.

    I would not be surprised in the slightest if deputies happened to inspect ballots while shaking someone down in the polling location.

    MKR wrote: »
    Someone hook me up with the I voted avatar. Going to need it this afternoon.

    (unless I make one out of the GA peach)
    Just right click save as on someone's avatar.

    One of his deputies took documents from a defendent's lawyer in a courtroom. I can totally see them refusing to let people vote for minor infractions.

    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Malkor wrote: »
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    fart on their heads

    alternatively I could just wear a beret and leather jacket. People already cross the street when I'm walking around, they'd flip their shit if they thought I was an honest-to-goodness Black Panther.

    I like the right wing's idea of training poll watchers so much that I'd like to do something similar locally next election. Maybe get a bunch of big black dudes trained up and have them as poll watchers in white neighborhoods. I'm sure the Republicans would be the first to jump to defend my effort to ensure the integrity of our elections.

    I'm semi-serious about this...

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Malkor wrote: »
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    fart on their heads

    alternatively I could just wear a beret and leather jacket. People already cross the street when I'm walking around, they'd flip their shit if they thought I was an honest-to-goodness Black Panther.

    I like the right wing's idea of training poll watchers so much that I'd like to do something similar locally next election. Maybe get a bunch of big black dudes trained up and have them as poll watchers in white neighborhoods. I'm sure the Republicans would be the first to jump to defend my effort to ensure the integrity of our elections.

    I'm semi-serious about this...

    Oh man, Michael Clarke Duncan there, all protecting people's right to vote. "Admit it, you find me imposing."

    steam_sig.png
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Malkor wrote: »
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    fart on their heads

    alternatively I could just wear a beret and leather jacket. People already cross the street when I'm walking around, they'd flip their shit if they thought I was an honest-to-goodness Black Panther.

    I like the right wing's idea of training poll watchers so much that I'd like to do something similar locally next election. Maybe get a bunch of big black dudes trained up and have them as poll watchers in white neighborhoods. I'm sure the Republicans would be the first to jump to defend my effort to ensure the integrity of our elections.

    I'm semi-serious about this...

    You know the open carry restrictions in California that the teepers love to bitch about? You know who put them in place?

    Reagan, when hw was governor in the 70s. Now, you know why he put them in place?

    Because the Black Panthers (the real ones, not the whackjobs trying to call themselves that today) decided to openly carry firearms, as they were allowed to at that time.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum
    Spoiler:
  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Malkor wrote: »
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    fart on their heads

    alternatively I could just wear a beret and leather jacket. People already cross the street when I'm walking around, they'd flip their shit if they thought I was an honest-to-goodness Black Panther.

    I like the right wing's idea of training poll watchers so much that I'd like to do something similar locally next election. Maybe get a bunch of big black dudes trained up and have them as poll watchers in white neighborhoods. I'm sure the Republicans would be the first to jump to defend my effort to ensure the integrity of our elections.

    I'm semi-serious about this...

    You know the open carry restrictions in California that the teepers love to bitch about? You know who put them in place?

    Reagan, when hw was governor in the 70s. Now, you know why he put them in place?

    Because the Black Panthers (the real ones, not the whackjobs trying to call themselves that today) decided to openly carry firearms, as they were allowed to at that time.

    You know, this makes me think that we could use the knee-jerk stupidity of the right wing against them, given the right stimulus. I bet that if we did the voter integrity/intimidation campaign the same way the right wing is doing it, they'd start pushing for restricting the poll watchers and changing how close people could be to a polling station.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    You know, this makes me think that we could use the knee-jerk stupidity of the right wing against them, given the right stimulus. I bet that if we did the voter integrity/intimidation campaign the same way the right wing is doing it, they'd start pushing for restricting the poll watchers and changing how close people could be to a polling station.
    So what you are saying is that we need to start suppressing suburban white votes.

  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Kastanj wrote: »
    So, what exactly are people going to do about the psychopathic white half-men who will try to scare voters away and demand that "certain people" show credentials?

    What is the plan.

    That's kinda tricky. You know what happens to people who oppose Sheriff Joe.

    I would not be surprised in the slightest if deputies happened to inspect ballots while shaking someone down in the polling location.

    Call the United States Attorney assigned to Arizona, alert them to the existence of the flier, and ask where you should send a copy. Arizona is one of the jurisdictions covered by section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Attorney General is authorized to direct that the Director of the Office of Personnel Management assign Federal election observers to any such jurisdiction after receiving meritorious complaints that any attempt under color of law to deny franchise on the grounds of race or color is likely to occur.

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Twenty years ago, I asked Richard Nixon what he thought of gun control. His on-the-record reply: "Guns are an abomination. " Free from fear of gun owners' retaliation at the polls, he favored making handguns illegal and requiring licenses for hunting rifles.

    Jimmy Carter:
    Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and I all supported a ban on these formidable firearms (the assault rifle ban), and one was finally passed in 1994.

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Couscous wrote: »
    You know, this makes me think that we could use the knee-jerk stupidity of the right wing against them, given the right stimulus. I bet that if we did the voter integrity/intimidation campaign the same way the right wing is doing it, they'd start pushing for restricting the poll watchers and changing how close people could be to a polling station.
    So what you are saying is that we need to start suppressing suburban white votes.

    It's not voter suppression! We just want to insure the integrity of the voting process.

    Seriously, though, we could bitch about their tactics and wait (possibly forever) for laws to clamp down on them. Or we could give them a taste of their own medicine and give them motivation to do what we want more expeditiously. I could care less about suppressing white voters, and more than anything I'd like to win by simply being right and convincing people that we're right. But I'm not above putting scare tactics towards a productive end. The other side certainly isn't squeamish about doing it, and we do ourselves and our causes a disservice by letting them have that advantage.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I get that people are cynical about the practical application of legal measures to ensure franchise, but honestly I've never had a problem getting the the DOJ involved. I was in a section 5 state several years back during a midterm election, and a volunteer called to tell me that there was a police officer sitting outside a polling station in his squad car. Which qualifies as voting intimidation under color of law. I kicked it up to the state party's legal department, and the next thing I knew I was talking to someone from the United States Attorney's office who wanted to know how to get in touch with the volunteer who witnessed the alleged intimidation.

    And that was when the U.S. attorney was a Bush appointee. The one there now is an Obama appointee.

  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I'm generally for legal, non-violent methods of doing objectively right things.

    Even better if it's to mirror and defeat the tactics of an opposing faction.

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Will you please donate to the gunz4opencarryingbyurbanminoritiez program? They need them to prevent crime while walking around.

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Illegals voting is a huge problem. If only there was some sort of list of people who were eligible to vote. Perhaps we could require people to register and check their ID at the poll.

    camo_sig2.png
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2010
    Tomanta wrote: »
    Illegals voting is a huge problem. If only there was some sort of list of people who were eligible to vote. Perhaps we could require people to register and check their ID at the poll.

    Come on man, get real! Who is going to maintain this list you propose? Pie-in-the-sky, man!

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Or we could just require them to provide proof of identity because there is no evidence illegals voting is a problem. i guess the Republicans just want to ensure future Mexican-Americans hate them.

  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Seriously, though, we could bitch about their tactics and wait (possibly forever) for laws to clamp down on them. Or we could give them a taste of their own medicine and give them motivation to do what we want more expeditiously. I could care less about suppressing white voters, and more than anything I'd like to win by simply being right and convincing people that we're right. But I'm not above putting scare tactics towards a productive end. The other side certainly isn't squeamish about doing it, and we do ourselves and our causes a disservice by letting them have that advantage.

    At what point does it become a race to the bottom? It's not that I don't like the idea of Democrats acting tough for once. I don't like the idea of mutually assured destruction being both party's main platform.

  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    SammyF wrote: »
    I get that people are cynical about the practical application of legal measures to ensure franchise, but honestly I've never had a problem getting the the DOJ involved. I was in a section 5 state several years back during a midterm election, and a volunteer called to tell me that there was a police officer sitting outside a polling station in his squad car. Which qualifies as voting intimidation under color of law. I kicked it up to the state party's legal department, and the next thing I knew I was talking to someone from the United States Attorney's office who wanted to know how to get in touch with the volunteer who witnessed the alleged intimidation.

    And that was when the U.S. attorney was a Bush appointee. The one there now is an Obama appointee.
    A public official (a police officer) parked near a polling place qualifies as voter intimidation? That seems incredibly odd. I've seen cops near polling places plenty of times, and never gave it a second thought.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Politics is nothing but a race to the bottom. We haven't even gotten near the bottom of the barrel. We are wusses compared to the Gilded Age and Jacksonian politics.

  • geckahngeckahn Registered User
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    SammyF wrote: »
    I get that people are cynical about the practical application of legal measures to ensure franchise, but honestly I've never had a problem getting the the DOJ involved. I was in a section 5 state several years back during a midterm election, and a volunteer called to tell me that there was a police officer sitting outside a polling station in his squad car. Which qualifies as voting intimidation under color of law. I kicked it up to the state party's legal department, and the next thing I knew I was talking to someone from the United States Attorney's office who wanted to know how to get in touch with the volunteer who witnessed the alleged intimidation.

    And that was when the U.S. attorney was a Bush appointee. The one there now is an Obama appointee.
    A public official (a police officer) parked near a polling place qualifies as voter intimidation? That seems incredibly odd. I've seen cops near polling places plenty of times, and never gave it a second thought.

    It's because it was a section 5 state. That would be the deep south.

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    anable wrote: »
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Seriously, though, we could bitch about their tactics and wait (possibly forever) for laws to clamp down on them. Or we could give them a taste of their own medicine and give them motivation to do what we want more expeditiously. I could care less about suppressing white voters, and more than anything I'd like to win by simply being right and convincing people that we're right. But I'm not above putting scare tactics towards a productive end. The other side certainly isn't squeamish about doing it, and we do ourselves and our causes a disservice by letting them have that advantage.

    At what point does it become a race to the bottom? It's not that I don't like the idea of Democrats acting tough for once. I don't like the idea of mutually assured destruction being both party's main platform.

    What Couscous said. Politics isn't a gentlemen's game and we shouldn't act like civility and good faith are the default positions in our political discourse when history demonstrates that these things are only observed when it's convenient and doesn't confer a disadvantage on political entities.

    Also, ModernMan, you're clearly not poor or a minority. I'm a black dude with no record and living a comfortably middle class lifestyle, and am acquainted with local a police officer. I am still very wary around police because that's how we (black people) are taught to treat interactions with police.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    You must not live in the South.

  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    There are still neighborhoods in New York City where the streets get eerily absent if a cop car drives through.

    I suspect the same is true in other urban centers. Just because you don't personally see it...

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    Especially in 2010. A stopped police car outside a polling station in Arizona...

    sigthree.png
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    Dude, it is Sheriff Joe. That is his whole thing.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    Because everyone knows that during the intervening 40 years, the negative interactions between police and minorities has decrease drastically. Drawing such a conclusion is crazy talk.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Anyone who thinks a Sheriff in ARIZONA standing near a polling place wouldn't intimidate brown folk into not voting is clearly not up to date on the political environment in AZ or the Maricopa County Sheriff's department reputation.

    camo_sig2.png
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Couscous wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    You must not live in the South.

  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Couscous wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    You must not live in the South.
    Technically, I've been living in the South since 2002.

    Heck, I'm a Republican in DC, which is a one-party state. And if there was a police force to be scared of, it would be the DC PD. But I've never given any thought to whether a police office near a polling place is trying to intimidate me. It just strikes me as paranoia.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • geckahngeckahn Registered User
    edited October 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    You must not live in the South.
    Technically, I've been living in the South since 2002.

    Heck, I'm a Republican in DC, which is a one-party state. And if there was a police force to be scared of, it would be the DC PD. But I've never given any thought to whether a police office near a polling place is trying to intimidate me. It just strikes me as paranoia.

    DC is not the south. at all. It's very much northeastern.

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    syndalis wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    I can see a stopped police car easily being voter intimidation in a lot of areas in Georgia.
    Maybe in 1965. But in 2010? It doesn't seem like a reasonable conclusion for someone to make that the local sheriff's deputy is there to suppress minority votes, barring some other evidence.

    There are still neighborhoods in New York City where the streets get eerily absent if a cop car drives through.

    I suspect the same is true in other urban centers. Just because you don't personally see it...

    Seeing a police officer in many places in Chicago means that bad shit is going down and you want to get the hell out of there because that is the one of the few reasons that they would be coming into that area.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forsyth_County,_Georgia#Marches_and_demonstrations_of_1980s
    More ethnically diverse citizens have begun in recent years to immigrate to the county, particularly in the affluent southern portion. However, the racial tension continued to be a part of the county's image into the early 1990s. This was infamously punctuated on January 17, 1987 by a march by civil rights activists in Cumming, and a counterdemonstration by a branch of the Ku Klux Klan, most of whom were not been residents of the county, and others who objected to the march. According to a story published in the New York Times on January 18, four marchers were slightly injured by stones, and bottles were thrown at them. Eight people from the counter-demonstration, all white, were arrested. The charges included trespassing and carrying concealed weapons.

    Originally, the march was going to be led by Forsyth resident Charles A. Blackburn. Blackburn wanted to dispel the racist image of Forsyth County, where he owned and operated a private school (The Blackburn Learning Center). Blackburn cancelled his plans after he received threatening phone calls. Other whites in nearby counties, as well as State Representative J.E. McKinney of Atlanta and Hosea Williams, who was on the Atlanta City Council, took up the march plans instead. The following week, January 24, approximately 20,000 civil rights activists marched in Cumming. This occurrence produced no violence, despite the presence of over 5,000 counter-demonstrators, summoned by the Forsyth County Defense League, largely due to the presence of about 2,000 peace officers and national guardsmen. Forsyth County paid $670,000 for police overtime during the political demonstration. There was considerable public outrage at the costs, particularly since most of the demonstrators on both sides were from outside the county. An interview with Forsyth County Sheriff Wesley Walraven, previous to the second march, is available in A Turn in the South by Nobel-prize winning author VS Naipaul.

    The demonstration is thought to have been the largest civil rights demonstration in the U.S. since about 1970. The unexpected turnout of some 6,000 counter-demonstrators, sixty-six of whom were arrested for "parading-without-a-permit," turned out to be the largest outpouring opposed to the Civil Rights Bill since the Sixties. The counter-demonstration was called by The Nationalist Movement, newly organized in Cumming, by Mark Watts, a local plumber. The original march had been triggered by an often repeated statement that Forsyth was "a county that warned black visitors not to 'let the sun go down on your head.' " New Georgia Encyclopedia. Marchers arrived on buses from all over the country and formed a caravan from Atlanta, under the watchful eye of National Guard troops on freeway overpasses along the nearly hour-long bus route. When marchers arrived, they discovered that most of the Cumming residents had already left town for the day, and some had boarded up their windows because they feared violence. Marchers wound slowly through streets lined by hundreds of armed National Guards, many of them black. At least two-thirds of the 20,000 civil rights marchers were white, according to eyewitnesses. Forsyth county subsequently charged large fees for parade permits until the practice was overturned in Forsyth County, Georgia v. The Nationalist Movement (505 U.S. 123) in the Supreme Court of the United States on June 19, 1992.

  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Come down to Georgia and go a little bit outside a big city.

This discussion has been closed.