Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Guns] FIRE EVERYTHING!

OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
GUNS!

Before I mention anything else, I'd like to cover safety.
You'll see a lot of 'codified' gun safety rules that claim they collate everything you need to know. Some are three items long, some are four, and some are ten- the longer lists tend to grow more and more redundant. The longer lists also find themselves drifting into guidelines, on top of the rules. The general, iron-clad set of gun safety rules you'll encounter (if only for their wide dissemination) are:

1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. This is the primary rule of gun safety. A safe direction means that the gun is pointed so that even if it were to go off it would not cause injury or damage. The key to this rule is to control where the muzzle or front end of the barrel is pointed at all times. Common sense dictates the safest direction, depending on different circumstances.

An important consideration in deciding a 'safe direction' (and a consideration that often garners a fourth rule on such lists) is awareness of both your target and what exists beyond it. A common phrasing of this rule is 'don't point your gun at anything you're not willing to destroy'.

2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot. When holding a gun, rest your finger on the trigger guard or along the side of the gun. Until you are actually ready to fire, do not touch the trigger.

Something else that bears mentioning is to avoid any obstruction at all in the trigger guard. Whether you are simply bringing the weapon to bear, or if you are carrying it on your person, keep in mind that the only thing you want in that guard is your trigger finger- and even that is only when you are prepared to fire imminently. At all other times your trigger finger should be splayed alongside the frame or receiver of the weapon, outside the trigger guard.
finger_off_trigger.jpg

(ignoring the gorilla fingers)

3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use. Whenever you pick up a gun, immediately engage the safety device if possible, and, if the gun has a magazine, remove it before opening the action and looking into the chamber(s) which should be clear of ammunition. If you do not know how to open the action or inspect the chamber(s), leave the gun alone and get help from someone who does.

Most external, active safeties are easy to spot and intuitive to operate. Some selective fire weapons integrate the mechanism to select whether the safety is engaged and also in what mode the weapon is fireable. The operation on either type of mechanism is similar. Unloading a pistol or most modern closed bolt rifles- or most anything you're likely to handle except a revolver- is similar in spirit if not in execution. You need to do two things: drop the magazine, and then clear the chamber. I've made a video to describe the general principle:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBsRl3bYWeg

Most modern, single-chamber weapons have an easily identifiable magazine catch and mechanism for actuating the entry/exit of a round into/from the chamber.

Revolvers aren't much harder- once you get your hands on one, there is a typically simple and evident method of making available the cylinders for loading.

Now, down to business.
Wikipedia wrote:
In modern parlance, a gun is a projectile weapon using a hollow, tubular barrel with a closed end—the breech—as the means of directing the projectile (as well as other purposes, for example stabilizing the projectile's trajectory, aiming, as an expansion chamber for propellant, etc), and firing in a generally flat trajectory

Most guns that you and I can own could be broken down into the following categories: handguns, rifles, and shotguns.

Handguns

A handgun is generally defined as a firearm that is designed with consideration for easy one handed use. This does not preclude two handed use (which will yield better results in terms of accuracy and repeated fire), but is still an important distinction in separating handguns from other lightweight firearms. Handguns have a long history, but by far the two most dominant iterations still in vogue today are revolvers and pistols.
Revolvers
Scrimshaw-2.jpg

A revolver is a handgun that feeds rounds into the barrel via a cylinder composed of multiple chambers. The majority of revolvers possess either five or six chambers in their stock cylinders. While not possessing the magazine capacity of most modern pistols, revolvers do offer distinct advantages. The construction of a revolver lends itself to reliability. Its design is very effective and proven. Not only does the system lend itself to fewer opportunities for malfunctions (for example, revolvers do not experience failures to eject spent cartridges, as expended rounds are not discharged from revolvers in the same way as they are from semi-automatic pistol platforms) but when flaws do manifest in a revolver they can typically be diagnosed much easier than in a pistol. While not always the case, repeated failures to fire or chamber properly in a revolver are often symptomatic of a major defect that requires manufacturer or third party repair. This is not the case with pistols, where many elements may creep into failure (like user error, low quality ammunition, et cetera). Another advantage to revolvers is their ability to be simply (and sparsely) cleaned. With their relatively few user modulated parts, fewer surfaces become exposed to contaminants that require cleaning- which minimizes the difficulty of cleaning and the necessary frequency of the above. There is also a matter of ammunition interoperability, which is far more prevalent on revolvers than on pistols. Certain revolver models allow for the application of multiple types of ammunition without the switching of parts. This is a less common perk on semi-auto pistols.
Pistols
Sig226.jpg

A semi-automatic pistol is a handgun that possesses only one chamber and only one barrel. Rather than rotating chambers or multiple barrels to permit lineup, semi-automatic pistols maintain a straight and uninterrupted path between the loading chamber and the barrel. Instead of preloading multiple chambers, ammunition is fed into a spring-loaded magazine which, with the help of varying applications, feeds rounds into the chamber. Modern centerfire pistols complete this cycling by harnessing the forces of one discharge to load the next round from the magazine and return the gun to battery. Pistols have the marked advantage of carrying a great deal of ammunition; some full sized pistols can hold up to 20 rounds of a full sized caliber. The form factor of a spare magazine, versus a speed loader, means that carrying even more ammo is relatively convenient. Some also argue that the lack of a bulging cylinder makes for a more comfortable and concealable weapon for carry.

Rifles

460767696_b225085e1f.jpg

A rifle is a shoulder-fired weapon with a rifled barrel. A rifled barrel is a barrel possessing deliberately applied grooves along its length, meant to impart a particular spin upon the round. Rifling works to maintain accuracy over distance. Rifles are quite diffuse and enjoy a wide range of applications, including recreation, hunting, varmint disposal, competition, etc.

Shotguns

w-shotguns.jpg

A shotgun is another typically shoulder-fired weapon. Its profile differs from a rifle in several ways. First, shotguns typically fire a particular mode of ammunition- either a solid slug or a number of pellets called shot. Secondly, shotguns are usually smoothbore firearms, lacking the rifling of other common small arms. Lastly, shotgun 'caliber' is defined by a particular bore metric called gauge. This measures the weight of a piece of lead with the same diameter as the inside of the barrel.

---

Ammunition


So, what do you fire from these guns? Except for the specific loads I mentioned, you typically fire a cartridge.
AMMUNITION_AND_COMPONENTS_POSTER_SMALL222.jpg

These cartridges have a pretty universal composition: a projectile (usually a bullet), a primer, a gunpowder, and the enveloping shell. How, exactly, does this work? Well, Wikipedia provides a pretty succinct explanation:
The cartridge case seals a firing chamber in all directions except down the bore. A firing pin strikes the primer, igniting it. The spark from the primer ignites the powder. Gases from the burning powder expand the case to seal against the chamber wall. The projectile is then pushed in the direction that releases this pressure, down the barrel. After the projectile leaves the barrel the pressure is released, allowing the cartridge case to be removed from the chamber.

While cartridges are often referred to as bullets, that is technically incorrect. The bullet is the projectile itself- the object that is impelled to forward velocity by the expansion of gases caused by the ignited primer. What do you need to know about the ammunition you shoot from a handgun or rifle? Well, a few things.
Bulletfixed1.png

^-- a centerfire cartridge

Is it rimfire or centerfire?

This describes the method by which the primer ignites and activates the powder. In rimfire ammunition, the firing pin strikes the weak perimeter of the case's rear, agitating the primer and lighting the powder in the body of the cartridge. This is the predominant priming method for .22lr ammunition, and some other small-game cartridges in popular use. Maybe it's centerfire. If it's for any caliber larger than .22lr, this is probably the case. In centerfire ammunition, the primer rests in the rear of the middle of the cartridge. The pin strikes, and the same process as above occurs. In handgun and rifle ammunition, the primer ignition and powder combustion propels the bullet; in shot, it propels the wad that contains the pellets.

When it's a bullet, what is its weight? We measure this weight by grains. 100 grains is about 6.5 grams. This is crucial in determining a few things- necessary amounts of powder, expected velocity, expected trajectory over distance, etc. How are the components packed in the shell? How much jacketing? For the most part, the two terms you'll hear are full metal jacket, and jacketed hollow point. I won't go into too much detail here, assuming that no one here except me reloads ammunition- but the long and short of it is that FMJ rounds have fully encased cores (usually in brass) and hollow points have a pitted and exposed portion of the bullet that will deform, expand, and slow- retarding penetration.

---

Application


So, what do you want to shoot at?

Targets?
25metertarget.jpg

FluorescentPaperTargets.gif

zombietargets_osama.jpg

I can advise a few things, here.

For pure paper, print your own targets. There are a myriad of websites to do this. Unless you're looking for reactive neon targets, you can print lots of designs for free. For steel, you can improvise. Make sure the material is safe. You can also order these online.

BE SAFE.

Clay?
scholastic_trap_shooting.jpg
2306clay_pigeon.jpg
clay-pigeon-image.jpg

Here you generally use shotguns (though there are some skilled trick shooters out there). Along with bird hunting, trapshooting is one of the most popular recreational uses for shotguns. A thrower- usually a machne- tosses a clay (or clays) in a given direction. Pretty simple, right?

Well, not on a windy day when they're going in any direction and you've fired a few hundred rounds already. Try it.

BE SAFE

Game?
boar_wild.jpg

wild_turkey.jpg

free_deer_hunting_tips_big_buck11.jpg

I don't know a great deal about hunting. It's not my thing- others are welcome to kick in their knowledge and I'll fold it into the OP if they wish.

BE SAFE.

---

And last but not least...

Defense

concealed-carry-belt.jpg
Gunselfdefense.jpg

I've saved this for last. There is a whole lot going on here.

Making the decision to purchase a weapon for self-defense can be very intimidating. Is it something of which I'm capable? Can I conceive shooting an animal or, God forbid, a person, if it comes to that? Can I be responsible in storing my weapon? Am I willing to be cautious and safe? Do I have the time and resources to become comfortable and competent? Will I be in compliance with the law?

Self-defense with a firearm is generally broken down into two categories: home defense, and on-person defense, or 'carry'. Carrying a firearm is having it on your person. Whether you are willing or capable to do either or both relies heavily on some of the questions I offered above. Answer honestly.

Assuming it is legal for you to own a firearm at all (and I admit that this thread is very slanted towards American customs and laws), you need to learn how to handle your weapon safely. I covered this briefly in the beginning of the thread, but it is especially important if you're giving serious thought to the possibility that your gun might be used to defend yourself or a loved one. All the inherent dangers of handling a deadly weapon are magnified by the threats presented in a self-defense situation. There are lots of things that you can do to mitigate those dangers:

(1) Fire your weapon, a lot. The most effective route, over time, to familiarize yourself with the awesome power of your weapon is to exercise that power.

(2) Seek professional training. Learn how to store your firearm safely. Learn how to load and and unload and clean and shoot your firearm until you're absolutely conversant with its use.

(3) Get in good shape! I am a long distance runner. I am prepared to use a gun in self-defense because there are bigger, meaner, and tougher people out there. My primary tool for staying safe is my 5:45 mile. With any luck, you will never encounter a criminal who means you harm. With a little less luck you will, but you will escape his or her intentions. With no luck at all you'll have to resort to defending yourself, and being in good shape and having a strong body will not hurt.

Those are general tips that can benefit either home-defense gun owners, or concealed carriers. Here I will get more specific.

Home defense

(1) Sensible precautions! Have good, high rated locks on your door. Invest in an alarm system. Have an escape or shelter plan for your family; just like for a house fire, you and your loved ones ought to have a basic plan in case of a home invader. The particulars will depend very much on your home life, and whether you have any children or other people living outside of your bedroom.

(2) Keep a phone near your bed! The absolute first thing you should do (particularly because it can be done while doing any number of things- like gathering your family in a safe room, or leaving the home, or retrieving a weapon) once you determine the presence of a threat is call 911. Don't be a cowboy. 911. 911. 911. The objective is defense. Texans- ignore your genetic urges.

(3) Know how to store your firearm. This will depend on your living situation. Everyone is different, and your solution for a defense gun (heavily fortified safe, lockbox, unlocked drawer, etc.) will depend on a number of factors- the age of those in your home, the number of floors, whether you keep doors locked within your home, and so on.

Carrying a firearm

(1) Know the law. Even in America, the laws on carrying a firearm are usually restrictive, versus possessing a gun inside your home or workplace. Read all applicable laws very closely.

http://www.handgunlaw.us/

Give this site a look and determine whether you are allowed to carry at all, whether you need a license, whether the license is shall-issue or may-issue, whether you must remain strictly concealed, whether you can carry in certain establishments, when you are legally permitted to draw your firearm, and so on.

(2) Be aware of your surroundings. This is useful for everything- even picking up chicks, you nerds. Don't be paranoid, and don't turn into a total nutjob, but keep your eyes open and that will solve a great deal of your problems, re: tripping over your own foot, walking into people, missing someone's flirting, running unawares into a criminal action, et cetera.

(3) Please, for the love of God, look into some retention training. You're talking about carrying a deadly weapon- one that you do not intend to have used against you. Knowing how to throw a punch won't hurt you and can even keep you in good shape.

(4) Make use of the proper equipment. Carrying a gun (even concealed) can be very comfortable and easy, if you spend a little bit of money and find something that works for you. Examples:
inside the waistband
Blade-TechRazorSeries.jpg

Inside the waistband holsters are popular for their ability to comfortably conceal a relatively large firearm.
outside the waistband
serpa1.jpg

Outside the waistband holsters are popular for in the winter when they are easier to conceal, for big people whose fat precludes comfortable carry inside the waistband, and for open carriers. Whether you plan on carrying inside or outside the waistband, a strong, double reinforced leather belt is a big help. In my opinion, it's essential.
shoulder
index.jpg

Shoulder holsters are popular in large part for their special, niche advantages. For one, they don't require a belt. Secondly, you don't need to navigate them when using the restroom. Third, they are easly accessible when seated. If you wear a suit daily, it can be a decent choice.
ankle
4750-ankle-holster.jpg

I don't like ankle holsters. Some people think they are convenient and out of the way, but in my experience they are bothersome if you plan on moving much, and the draw is hideously slow.
pocket
KT3-Split.jpg

Pocket holsters are very popular for small handguns. When your weapon is small enough to fit comfortably in a pocket, the allure of having it off your belt is very attractive.

Overall, I'd recommend selecting a holster that fits your needs. And absolutely get a holster that has some sort of coverage over the trigger guard.

(5) I highly recommend putting several hundred rounds of your defense ammunition- the ammo you'll have in your carry weapon every day- through the specific weapon. Even quality makers (of firearms and ammunition) can have interoperability problems, with poor throating or low powder loads or any other number of issues that could cost you your life.

(6) Select a weapon chambered in the caliber that is right for you. There is no definite answer. As I'll be mentioning in the rules, no caliber shitting. Anything is better than nothing. Generally speaking, handgun calibers are considered 'self-defense grade' at .380 auto and above- including 9mm luger, .40 smith and wesson, .357 magnum, .357 sig, .45 acp, and 10mm auto. I stress, preference is crucial. Use the largest, most energetic caliber that you can a) afford, b) comfortably control, and c) shoot accurately. If you can handle .44 magnum, well... enjoy. Mutant. Also, generally speaking you will be seeking a hollow point round for self-defense, given its tendency to expand and not penetrate too far.

BE SAFE.

Rules


(1) If you're legitimately interested in ballistics, or caliber profiles, fine. We can talk numbers. Do. not. be. a. jerk. Caliber wars will not be tolerated.

(2) Feel free to share your thoughts on self-defense with firearms, and discuss your safes and lockboxes and how you store your guns and etc. Keep in mind, though, that home invasions when you are home, and you wake up, and you grab your firearm, and you find the intruder, and you engage... are incredibly uncommon. Please don't be obnoxious about this. No cowboy fantasies. Talk home security, fine, but calm down, killer. We don't want to hear any ranting about how you keep a 12-gauge under your mattress and a 9mm and 45 under either pillow loaded with alternating HPs and FMJs in case they're wearing body armor. Down, boy. Don't.

(3) This thread is not for debate about gun control. You're welcome to mention certain going-ons- gun rights court cases, for example. I also invite you to discuss encounters you've had with other people and their feelings. But don't be a douchebag. Don't be pugnacious. Chill out. If you have genuine, good-faith questions about firearms and why people like them, you're welcome to ask. But seriously chill. I got the mods in my pocket, son, and I'll be on you so fast.

Organichu on
«13456796

Posts

  • TL DRTL DR On this, reasonable people can disagreeRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Awesome OP. "Texans, ignore your genetic urges" :P

    Lacks Hello Kitty AR variant.

  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Nice OP, I would just like to add that it doesn't make sense to print out targets if you are training for competition, you won't be able to score them properly as the paper tears differently.

    And you aren't the only person on the forum that reloads, I do as well - or did when I was competing, I've got enough hunting ammo to last for several years at this point.

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • GooeyGooey (\/)┌¶─¶┐(\/) pinch pinchRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Sig 228: Best 9mm pistol ever made. Discuss.

    919UOwT.png
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    fine, fine

    all the classic funny gun pics and useful charts:

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Kistra wrote: »
    Nice OP, I would just like to add that it doesn't make sense to print out targets if you are training for competition, you won't be able to score them properly as the paper tears differently.

    i only meant for putzing around, but that is a fair qualifier

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I'd love to get a gun to plink around with but living in the city isn't really conducive to that. Stupid criminals and their stupid crimes.

    "But now," says the Once-ler,
    "Now that you're here,
    the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.
    UNLESS someone like you
    cares a whole awful lot,
    nothing is going to get better.
    It's not.
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    do you live in philly peen? i know all about the gun laws here if you ever have any questions

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    That's right, I forgot you were a local dude. Basically I don't know about any indoor ranges around and what it costs to go to them and such. I've already figured that if I were going to get something it'd probably be a snazzy little .22 pistol, though not what model exactly.

    "But now," says the Once-ler,
    "Now that you're here,
    the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.
    UNLESS someone like you
    cares a whole awful lot,
    nothing is going to get better.
    It's not.
  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    My dad just picked up a vintage WWII german rifle at a gun show. He's been collecting WWII rifles for some time now. I'm surprised at the cost of some of the firearms from that era. The more common, mass-produced stuff is relatively cheap, but the rarer items (like proto-modern German assault rifles) have really hefty price-tags.

    I'm thinking of getting him an M-4 for Christmas to try and break him of the old gun habit. So many of the older rifles are total beasts in terms of weight and recoil. They're a total pain to shoot with.

    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    a good starter pistol is a ruger mk iii; they can be had new for under $300. i've personally seen one run for over 100,000 rounds with only a few replaced pins. .22lr is absurdly cheap and low energy- you'll be able to shoot boatloads on the dollar, and the low power load really enables you to work on trigger control.

    pennsylvania is not very strict. you see it in a store or online, you select it. if online, they ship it to an ffl holder. you need to pass PICS (pennsylvania instant check system). not a felon, not mentally unfit, etc. it's a phone call-in the license holder does. if you pass, you go home with it the same day.

    unless you want to eventually get your license to carry a firearm, when outside your home it needs to be stored separately from the ammunition, and only transported directly to use it, or from work to home, et cetera.

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Yeah that's why I was thinking .22. It's not getting the gun that's so much the issue, it's where to shoot it that I can't figure out :).

    "But now," says the Once-ler,
    "Now that you're here,
    the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.
    UNLESS someone like you
    cares a whole awful lot,
    nothing is going to get better.
    It's not.
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    you live near, what, manayunk?

  • ThomamelasThomamelas SANTRON---HAS-COME-TO-TOWN MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL---EXCEPT THE AVENGERS. THE AVENGERS MUST DIE!Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Chu, you might want to add this target to your list:

    Pistol-Correction-RH-Mini.jpg

    Actual Printable version.

    I keep a stack of them with my pistol, they tend to be very nice for new shooters to learn what they are doing wrong.

    7AR8W5w.png
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    done, thanks

  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    edited October 2010
    chu the safety part of the op is totally wrong without the picture of you with the gun to your head

    huntresssig.jpg
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Title should say MOAR DAKKA.
    more_dakka.jpg

    3DS Friendcode 5413-1311-3767
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Arivia wrote: »
    chu the safety part of the op is totally wrong without the picture of you with the gun to your head

    look i'm trying to set a good example arivia

    then i'd have to explain how it was visual perspective and it was pointed behind me in the safest direction and it was unloaded and...

    I CAN'T LIVE WITH THE POSSIBILITIES ON MY CONSCIENCE

    edit: ok fine but if someone offs themselves it's on you

    on you

    willohgod.jpg

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Organichu wrote: »
    you live near, what, manayunk?

    Way up in Roxborough, so near Manayunk yeah.

    Man I can already see from that target Thom posted that I'm gonna need some work when I actually shoot regularly.

    "But now," says the Once-ler,
    "Now that you're here,
    the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.
    UNLESS someone like you
    cares a whole awful lot,
    nothing is going to get better.
    It's not.
  • ThomamelasThomamelas SANTRON---HAS-COME-TO-TOWN MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL---EXCEPT THE AVENGERS. THE AVENGERS MUST DIE!Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Peen wrote: »
    Organichu wrote: »
    you live near, what, manayunk?

    Way up in Roxborough, so near Manayunk yeah.

    Man I can already see from that target Thom posted that I'm gonna need some work when I actually shoot regularly.

    Everyone does. Shooting isn't a natural human activity. Staying very still and not jumping at loud noises goes against human nature. Shooting well and accurately requires a lot of practice.

    7AR8W5w.png
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Peen wrote: »
    Organichu wrote: »
    you live near, what, manayunk?

    Way up in Roxborough, so near Manayunk yeah.

    Man I can already see from that target Thom posted that I'm gonna need some work when I actually shoot regularly.

    there's colosimo's off spring garden, between 9th and 10th- but i've had poor experiences there

    unless you're willing to drive way way up to like, southampton, to classic pistol (which is a great place), the only three others i know of in the city are: philadelphia archery and gun on like 9th and ellsworth, the firing line on front and tasker (this is at least right off 95), and the delaware shooting club in bustleton.

    i don't really know any places there up north-northwest of roxborough.

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    That's for sure. Thanks to the Boy Scouts I'm not completely hopeless but it'll be nice to eventually have my own gun to practice with and get used to, always shooting someone else's gets old.

    Edit: Thanks Organichu, I didn't even know about those. I'm pretty much filing this away under "to do in the future" when we move out of the city and back to the 'burbs.

    "But now," says the Once-ler,
    "Now that you're here,
    the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.
    UNLESS someone like you
    cares a whole awful lot,
    nothing is going to get better.
    It's not.
  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Organichu wrote: »
    pennsylvania is not very strict. you see it in a store or online, you select it. if online, they ship it to an ffl holder. you need to pass PICS (pennsylvania instant check system). not a felon, not mentally unfit, etc. it's a phone call-in the license holder does. if you pass, you go home with it the same day.

    Philly does have a few city specific gun laws. For instance it is illegal to have an air rifle within city limits. That pissed me off to no end when I moved here. I can't wait to move outside of city limits.

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    i didn't know about the air rifle thing. interesting.

  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Gooey wrote: »
    Sig 228: Best 9mm pistol ever made. Discuss.

    I prefer the way a P226 fits in my hand; regardless, I like the way you think and believe we should be BFFs.

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    i am also a big p-series fan

    that and their CS have made me a lifelong fan

  • RocketSauceRocketSauce Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Gooey wrote: »
    Sig 228: Best 9mm pistol ever made. Discuss.

    I think Sig makes a fantastic weapon, for 9mm I'd probably go with the 226. However, if we're talking best ever made, it's got to be the Glock 19. Compact, accurate, durable, simple, and excellent capacity. Also, unlike the Sig, you don't have to take out a small loan to afford the magazines.

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    third party SIG mags are fantastic- namely, mec-gar. mec-gar actually makes most of the p-series factory magazines. you will see their emblem stamped under the floor plate. they sell magazines with their emblem on the main of the body, and sometimes in higher capacities, for cheap.

    i got several 15 round magazines for my 229 (a weapon that is shipped with 13rd mags) for like $22 a pop, new

    Feriluce
  • ThomamelasThomamelas SANTRON---HAS-COME-TO-TOWN MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL---EXCEPT THE AVENGERS. THE AVENGERS MUST DIE!Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Speaking of magazines, I have the AA .22lr conversion kit for my Glock. The only issue I have with it is that they only offer 10 round magazines. Has anyone spotted any magazines for that kit that have more capacity?

    7AR8W5w.png
  • zilozilo Registered User
    edited October 2010
    Bah. You people and your high-capacity magazines, real men do it 10 rounds at a time.

  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Gooey wrote: »
    Sig 228: Best 9mm pistol ever made. Discuss.

    I think Sig makes a fantastic weapon, for 9mm I'd probably go with the 226. However, if we're talking best ever made, it's got to be the Glock 19. Compact, accurate, durable, simple, and excellent capacity. Also, unlike the Sig, you don't have to take out a small loan to afford the magazines.

    I know tons of people love Glocks in part because of their relative affordability, but... I just don't know, man. Maybe it's because the natural grip of my hand isn't suited to Glocks, but I cannot get a good shot grouping out of one unless I'm constantly concentrating on everything about my grip, my posture, how I'm holding my arms, how much pressure I'm putting on the trigger, and all of that is before I even begin thinking about the sight picture. Nothing about a Glock feels natural to me, while a Sig feels like a natural extension of my arm. It doesn't even feel like aiming -- it's like all I have to do is point in the general direction of the target, and the firearm takes over, putting a round of .357 SIG down the center every time I squeeze the trigger.

    I do understand that people have different hands and bodies and what not, and maybe for some people a Glock feels just as natural as a Sig feels to me. I kind of wish I was one of those people because a Sig is pretty fucking expensive.

  • Unearthly StewUnearthly Stew Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    zilo wrote: »
    Bah. You people and your high-capacity magazines, real men do it 10 rounds at a time.

    You mean 6. Revolvers are greater than semi autos. :D

    Speaking of which, I do disagree about the cleaning part about revolvers in the OP. Having to clean out each cylinder is a bitch and a half. You can clean most of a semi auto with a few passes of a bore snake, but my revolver requires so many more passes. It's also possible I'm just too much of a perfectionist when it comes to cleaning my top break...

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    zilo wrote: »
    Bah. You people and your high-capacity magazines, real men do it 10 rounds at a time.

    You mean 6. Revolvers are greater than semi autos. :D

    Speaking of which, I do disagree about the cleaning part about revolvers in the OP. Having to clean out each cylinder is a bitch and a half. You can clean most of a semi auto with a few passes of a bore snake, but my revolver requires so many more passes. It's also possible I'm just too much of a perfectionist when it comes to cleaning my top break...

    could be

    i'm not much of a revolver guy... any time i touch one i want it out of my hands ASAP, so i prolly don't clean it thoroughly ;-)

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Speaking of magazines, I have the AA .22lr conversion kit for my Glock. The only issue I have with it is that they only offer 10 round magazines. Has anyone spotted any magazines for that kit that have more capacity?

    i doubt it

    AA's facility is in california; i doubt they'll put one out first party

    so unless there's some obscure third party solution, you may be SoL

  • ThomamelasThomamelas SANTRON---HAS-COME-TO-TOWN MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL---EXCEPT THE AVENGERS. THE AVENGERS MUST DIE!Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Organichu wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Speaking of magazines, I have the AA .22lr conversion kit for my Glock. The only issue I have with it is that they only offer 10 round magazines. Has anyone spotted any magazines for that kit that have more capacity?

    i doubt it

    AA's facility is in california; i doubt they'll put one out first party

    so unless there's some obscure third party solution, you may be SoL

    Yeah, it's what I figured.

    7AR8W5w.png
  • EWomEWom Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    This is my wifes new gun. Beretta Neos .22LR. Unfortunately it has recently been recalled so we need to ship it off to Beretta. The issue is with the firing pin, can slip past the safety. But it's been a fun little gun, and we plan on putting a red dot scope on it.

    neos.jpg

    Also I've got a .357magnum which is just a treat. It was passed down to me by my dad, who got it in the 70's.

    sw357.jpg



    Also we've got 2 rifles, a .22 mag Mossberg from who knows when (also got it from my dad) which is a very fine plinker, And a Mossberg 802 Plinkster .22lr, which is a horribly unaccurate piece of shit.

    Whether they find a life there or not, I think Jupiter should be called an enemy planet.
  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    EWom wrote: »
    This is my wifes new gun. Beretta Neos .22LR. Unfortunately it has recently been recalled so we need to ship it off to Beretta. The issue is with the firing pin, can slip past the safety.

    D: That's a very good reason to issue a recall....

  • NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    So since I'm now a licensed security guard, I'm looking to get a firearm permit along with all the required state permits.

    I'm still wondering what I should get though. I used the M92fs in the Navy, but I also tooled around a bit with a Sig P226. Also wondering if I should stick with 9mm or go for a double stacked .45 or .40S&W. Basically I need a fair compromise between potential stopping power and cost.

    EDIT: For the record, I live in California so my choices are rather limited.

    newSig.jpg
  • ThomamelasThomamelas SANTRON---HAS-COME-TO-TOWN MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL---EXCEPT THE AVENGERS. THE AVENGERS MUST DIE!Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Nocren wrote: »
    So since I'm now a licensed security guard, I'm looking to get a firearm permit along with all the required state permits.

    I'm still wondering what I should get though. I used the M92fs in the Navy, but I also tooled around a bit with a Sig P226. Also wondering if I should stick with 9mm or go for a double stacked .45 or .40S&W. Basically I need a fair compromise between potential stopping power and cost.

    EDIT: For the record, I live in California so my choices are rather limited.

    What ever is comfortable. Amongst rounds you listed, shot placement is much more more important. All of those rounds are potentially lethal, so you want something that you will be accurate with. Stopping power is generally pretty damn silly a concept. A 9mm can be anywhere from ~450 J to ~700 J worth of force. A .45 can range from ~350 J to ~700 J worth of force. The amount of overpenetration of the bullet is going to vary much more by the manufacturer product lines you use then the actual caliber. The slight difference in the size of the bullet is much less important then the accuracy of your fire.

    7AR8W5w.png
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I posted this in the last thread, but there was little activity, so here's our stuff.

    For my birthday, my parents sent some money my way so I could buy my .22 lever action I've been wanting for years. Here she is, a basic Henry .22LR.
    IMAG0140.jpg
    I fired it at the range on Sunday and it's like a dream. However, it was also cheap. About $100 cheaper than I was expecting (and than list). So I spent $80 of that extra on this.
    IMAG0138.jpg
    IMAG0139.jpg
    A Mauser. :D It's not all original (the stock has obviously been replaced), but the mechanical parts are all there and in decent shape. The iron eagle prints are very visible in the metal, which is really cool. One minor problem is that the spring seems a bit wonky. I can load four rounds ok, but if I try to put a fifth in, the bolt won't chamber it properly. I'm sure this can be fixed, but I haven't looked around for how to do so. Also, I'd never fired something this big before... my shoulder took a couple days to recover. So worth it.

    Also, the wife has a Glock 19 which she loves. I'm not the biggest fan, but then I'm not a huge handgun fan either. They're alright, but I have a lot more fun with rifles.

    steam_sig.png
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I remember reading about a handgun fighting course in Texas where they said "A handgun is what you use when you can't get to your real firearm."

    Yeah, luckily Placer county is a pretty big red district (and in the foothills) so finding decent gun store isn't a problem, and they're all pretty damn friendly about finding the right gun. Right now it's about cost though.

    newSig.jpg
«13456796
Sign In or Register to comment.