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Oh [chat]...

1246763

Posts

  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Oh man Appalachian folks don't even sound like they are speaking English sometimes.

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  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Hm, a friend just offered be $100 to write a paper for them.

    I really could use the cash but I definitely have some moral reservations.

    Punch them.

    Punch them hard.

    Give them a lecture about why this is what is wrong with America while punching them hard.

    But he's in Denmark.

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  • IncenjucarIncenjucar QA Tester -> Game Producer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Oh man Appalachian folks don't even sound like they are speaking English sometimes.

    This is also true of Valley Girls.

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  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    We do have dialects, Creole is one of the easiest to pick out. It has French, English and some Spanish mixed into it.

    Speaking of pidgin languages, Yiddish is a great one to study. Since there are three different main ones I know of, Russian, German and Polish.

    Then there is Ladino, which I only realised was a thing a year or two back - basically a Jewish language based on old Castilian with huge amounts of influence from Arabic/Greek and other Med languages

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    If you ever want to hear funny sounding English you should listen to me.

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  • PasserbyePasserbye The Woman Who Is Not Short at The Moonlite All-Nite Diner; a glass box full of bad food and good people.Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abby - I think it's also that most Americans aren't so crazy proud about their dialects as you Norwegians seem to be of yours. Most Americans are willing to leave their dialects and accents behind.
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Oh man Appalachian folks don't even sound like they are speaking English sometimes.

    I read a study a while back which had discovered that the oldest form of English still being spoken was in a small town in the Appalachians. I thought that was pretty cool.

  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Passerbye wrote: »
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    Passerbye wrote: »
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    I didn't know if it was just because it was on TV or if everyone actually did talk the same way in america

    I think it's partly because so many people who came here were leaving their country, not just migrating. I'm not sure, though. I think it's also that languages other than English aren't generally held in high regard in American culture.

    I grew up with a modern variation on Pidgin (Hawaiian Creole), which consisted of about 75% English, with the remaining 25% a mix of Hawaiian, Filipino, Japanese, Chinese, and Portuguese. My friends' grandparents spoke a different variation of Pidgin which was about 50% English and the rest everything else. I met a 96 year old woman who'd been born in Ewa Plantation who spoke only Japanese and Pidgin, and her Pidgin had maybe a handful of English words and was a big mix of everything else.

    heh

    yeah, maybe the melting pot has resulted in bland gruel on the language front

    but still it's wierd that there's so small differences beetween english and english in america

    I mean, yeah, I can understand foreign-influenced languages disappearing but there's still something going on that makes everyone else in that huge fucking country talk so similarily

    I don't think it's quite accurate to say that we all talk similarly, though. Syntax can be similar often times, but there can also be a variety of different words used, and often times different areas have very distinct accents. For the longest time I couldn't make heads or tails of my old roommate's West Virginia accent. It's just not such a huge difference as to really be called a separate dialect most of the time.

    yeah, it's a generalization

    but still

    the us just seems so

    oversized in this respect

    like, you have to travel the length of my entire country to get real differences in dialects when I can take a long walk

    maybe it comes from us being kind of stationary compared to you

    my lineage consists of a couple hundred years of never moving more than a short boatride away

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  • IncenjucarIncenjucar QA Tester -> Game Producer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Hm, a friend just offered be $100 to write a paper for them.

    I really could use the cash but I definitely have some moral reservations.

    Punch them.

    Punch them hard.

    Give them a lecture about why this is what is wrong with America while punching them hard.

    But he's in Denmark.

    Oh in that case congratulate him on trying to turn Denmark into America.

    freefallagentad_zps635a83ed.png
  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

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  • PasserbyePasserbye The Woman Who Is Not Short at The Moonlite All-Nite Diner; a glass box full of bad food and good people.Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    We do have dialects, Creole is one of the easiest to pick out. It has French, English and some Spanish mixed into it.

    Speaking of pidgin languages, Yiddish is a great one to study. Since there are three different main ones I know of, Russian, German and Polish.

    Oh we definitely have dialects (note my story of growing up with Pidgin). But they're few and far between compared to most other countries.

  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Passerbye wrote: »
    I read a study a while back which had discovered that the oldest form of English still being spoken was in a small town in the Appalachians. I thought that was pretty cool.

    That is because what goes to Appalachia stays there. Forever. Breeding with itself.

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  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    If you ever want to hear funny sounding English you should listen to me.

    I love how you add extra syllables to made up words in games. Mah-lay-ah-dee. :P

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  • Aroused BullAroused Bull Registered User
    edited October 2010
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    I mean, yeah, I can understand foreign-influenced languages disappearing but there's still something going on that makes everyone else in that huge fucking country talk so similarily

    America was settled a lot more recently than any European country. I'm not well-informed about American history, but I imagine colonial-era America had a lot more long-distance travel and cultural exchange than late-medieval Europe, too.

  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Hm, a friend just offered be $100 to write a paper for them.

    I really could use the cash but I definitely have some moral reservations.

    Punch them.

    Punch them hard.

    Give them a lecture about why this is what is wrong with America while punching them hard.

    Fuck yeah. $100 bucks is chump change.

  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Alrighty, gotta split, later guys.

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  • PasserbyePasserbye The Woman Who Is Not Short at The Moonlite All-Nite Diner; a glass box full of bad food and good people.Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    yeah, it's a generalization

    but still

    the us just seems so

    oversized in this respect

    like, you have to travel the length of my entire country to get real differences in dialects when I can take a long walk

    maybe it comes from us being kind of stationary compared to you

    my lineage consists of a couple hundred years of never moving more than a short boatride away

    Mmmmn, I'm not sure on that either. A lot of people in the US tend to stay where they were born as well. It's just that, like I said, most Americans don't cling to their dialects/accents, they don't see language as a part of their heritage. Kind of makes me sad, but that's how it is for most people.

  • Rear Admiral ChocoRear Admiral Choco Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Joanna and her friends hang out every Friday night. After a few weeks, one of her friends brings her (twin) brother, who was curious as to where she was going; they get along reasonably well, and she figured he'd enjoy it, so she decided he should come. A couple of weeks after that, he asks Joanna out to a movie, which she gladly accepts; his sister, who knew Joanna before he did, is pissed, and Joanna catches a little of their conversation before they drive away. Is it reasonable for Joanna to call Nina and tell her it's okay/to lighten up, or is that not a thing girls do?

    It's reasonable if Nina isn't an idiot, sure. Judging from this situation I wouldn't assume that, though. :P

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  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Passerbye wrote: »
    Abby - I think it's also that most Americans aren't so crazy proud about their dialects as you Norwegians seem to be of yours. Most Americans are willing to leave their dialects and accents behind.
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Oh man Appalachian folks don't even sound like they are speaking English sometimes.

    I read a study a while back which had discovered that the oldest form of English still being spoken was in a small town in the Appalachians. I thought that was pretty cool.

    We're nationalistic in the extreme, really

    about everything

    Scandinavia

    Norway

    Our part of the country

    our county

    our city

    our borough

    nationalistic is a misnomer at these levels but it still seems apt

    it's not patriotism

    it's not something you can call someone out on not being, for example

    it's not something you prove or try to show

    it's just the knowledge, as steadfast as the belief in the sky being above you or the ground below

    that my country is the best. Everything about it, even it's flaws are the most wonderful in the world.

    My city is the greatest. It's not the biggest, it's not the prettiest

    but it's the best

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  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Actually a lot of the difference in accent and dialect comes from stationary populations. Actually the US was pretty stationary(I mean not compared to Europe) so that is where developed a lot our accents. The mobile population is still a really new thing in the US. More like the last 3 generations.

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  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I think the worst accent I ever heard belonged to a middle aged doctor from NZ who had spent much of her adult life in the US and was then kidnapped in Yemen about 5 years back. When she was freed she gave some interviews and her accent went all over the place and in the end I had to turn off the tv it was so painful

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    I mean, yeah, I can understand foreign-influenced languages disappearing but there's still something going on that makes everyone else in that huge fucking country talk so similarily

    America was settled a lot more recently than any European country. I'm not well-informed about American history, but I imagine colonial-era America had a lot more long-distance travel and cultural exchange than late-medieval Europe, too.

    I would think so. for one, there was a point in moving in america.

    Here people largely didn't move beyond the next valley over.

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  • PasserbyePasserbye The Woman Who Is Not Short at The Moonlite All-Nite Diner; a glass box full of bad food and good people.Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abby - Americans can be crazy proud about things like that too. Most just don't consider language to automatically be a part of that.

  • wazillawazilla Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

    Isn't "hella" every 2nd word out of the mouth of anyone from NorCal?

  • TL DRTL DR Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Is the paper something which is likely to enrich the friend's life and/or learning experience, or is it like 90% of school assignments in that it's utterly useless for anything other than judging whether you've applied the modicum of effort necessary to get your gold star and move on to the next money sink?

    IMO, if it's something you can pay a lay-person to do, it's not something to be concerned about missing.

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  • WinkyWinky Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

    Do I have an identifiable Chicago accent?

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  • IncenjucarIncenjucar QA Tester -> Game Producer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    wazilla wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

    Isn't "hella" every 2nd word out of the mouth of anyone from NorCal?

    Saying "hella" and "sweet" just mean you have been watching South Park.

    freefallagentad_zps635a83ed.png
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot Harrisonburg, VARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Joanna and her friends hang out every Friday night. After a few weeks, one of her friends brings her (twin) brother, who was curious as to where she was going; they get along reasonably well, and she figured he'd enjoy it, so she decided he should come. A couple of weeks after that, he asks Joanna out to a movie, which she gladly accepts; his sister, who knew Joanna before he did, is pissed, and Joanna catches a little of their conversation before they drive away. Is it reasonable for Joanna to call Nina and tell her it's okay/to lighten up, or is that not a thing girls do?

    It's reasonable if Nina isn't an idiot, sure. Judging from this situation I wouldn't assume that, though. :P

    I'm having Nina call Joanna and be flummoxed that Joanna actually wants to go out with Max. Mostly Nina is just having the classic issue of "my siblings can't date my friends", but she'll get over it. They're in college, so being a little immature isn't unreasonable.

  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Passerbye wrote: »
    Abby - Americans can be crazy proud about things like that too. Most just don't consider language to automatically be a part of that.

    I can see that, but still

    to lose it you have to talk to people who talk differently

    people around me aren't talking a dialect, they're just talking normally

    but if you're exposed to other dialects alot then you notice your own

    then the question is if you just change it like it ain't no thang or if you try to keep it

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  • Silas BrownSilas Brown Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Joanna and her friends hang out every Friday night. After a few weeks, one of her friends brings her (twin) brother, who was curious as to where she was going; they get along reasonably well, and she figured he'd enjoy it, so she decided he should come. A couple of weeks after that, he asks Joanna out to a movie, which she gladly accepts; his sister, who knew Joanna before he did, is pissed, and Joanna catches a little of their conversation before they drive away. Is it reasonable for Joanna to call Nina and tell her it's okay/to lighten up, or is that not a thing girls do?

    It's reasonable if Nina isn't an idiot, sure. Judging from this situation I wouldn't assume that, though. :P

    I'm having Nina call Joanna and be flummoxed that Joanna actually wants to go out with Max. Mostly Nina is just having the classic issue of "my siblings can't date my friends", but she'll get over it. They're in college, so being a little immature isn't unreasonable.

    Damn, this is the coolest thing anyone in [chat] has ever said.

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  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    edited October 2010
    whee new Sarah McLachlan

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  • IncenjucarIncenjucar QA Tester -> Game Producer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I sometimes catch myself pronouncing things differently than how I pronounce them in my head.

    It's somewhat worrying.

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  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    wazilla wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

    Isn't "hella" every 2nd word out of the mouth of anyone from NorCal?

    Saying "hella" and "sweet" just mean you have been watching South Park.

    California is huge, though

    ftOqU21.png
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar QA Tester -> Game Producer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    wazilla wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I can definitely tell differences in how people speak across the US. Heck, I can tell the difference between SoCal and NorCal, though I guess it is kinda subtle.

    Isn't "hella" every 2nd word out of the mouth of anyone from NorCal?

    Saying "hella" and "sweet" just mean you have been watching South Park.

    California is huge, though

    California is at least five different regions huge. :P

    freefallagentad_zps635a83ed.png
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot Harrisonburg, VARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Joanna and her friends hang out every Friday night. After a few weeks, one of her friends brings her (twin) brother, who was curious as to where she was going; they get along reasonably well, and she figured he'd enjoy it, so she decided he should come. A couple of weeks after that, he asks Joanna out to a movie, which she gladly accepts; his sister, who knew Joanna before he did, is pissed, and Joanna catches a little of their conversation before they drive away. Is it reasonable for Joanna to call Nina and tell her it's okay/to lighten up, or is that not a thing girls do?

    It's reasonable if Nina isn't an idiot, sure. Judging from this situation I wouldn't assume that, though. :P

    I'm having Nina call Joanna and be flummoxed that Joanna actually wants to go out with Max. Mostly Nina is just having the classic issue of "my siblings can't date my friends", but she'll get over it. They're in college, so being a little immature isn't unreasonable.

    Damn, this is the coolest thing anyone in [chat] has ever said.

    you're making fun of me, aren't you

  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    South Park is in Colorado Abdhy, its an area in the mountains. Both the creators are from Boulder where Kakos lives.

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  • ElldrenElldren 3067-6294-6208Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
  • MazzyxMazzyx A Restoration through Revolution. Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
  • WinkyWinky Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
  • ThomamelasThomamelas “Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die.” Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Arivia wrote: »
    whee new Sarah McLachlan

    Another 12 or 13 counts of crimes against Humanity.

  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    Passerbye wrote: »
    Abby - Americans can be crazy proud about things like that too. Most just don't consider language to automatically be a part of that.

    I can see that, but still

    to lose it you have to talk to people who talk differently

    people around me aren't talking a dialect, they're just talking normally

    but if you're exposed to other dialects alot then you notice your own

    then the question is if you just change it like it ain't no thang or if you try to keep it

    I'm having this issue living in London and it seems my accent is changing slowly - although to what depends on the listener. So for example today I went to an Australian cafe and was surrounded by Aussies for an hour, which seemed to influence my accent so when I was paying the bill the Aussie waitress thought I was Australian (huge faux pas in English speaking circles!). Whereas a month or so ago I was at a BBQ with lots of English people I didn't know and a lot of them mistook me for English. Then on the phone I often get asked if I'm South African.

    To me it sounds like I'm still speaking NZ English.

    I have a Kiwi friend back home who within 5 minutes of being around Americans picks up this weird pseudo American accent. It is very odd but he cannot help himself

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
This discussion has been closed.