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How to pproach sensitive work situation

PongePonge Registered User regular
edited November 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
I started working for a large company in a very small centralised industry about 5 weeks ago straight from graduation. For 4 weeks I was in the department I signed up for, doing the job I trained in and really loving it and doing quite well. Another department where shortstaffed and asked the bosses for resources, they asked my supervisor for the names of 2 'quick learners' and he put forward me and another guy. We were both transferred to this other department a week ago and, well, I hate it. They have very little work at the moment so I've basically had nothing to do for the last week (I've been asking for work every day and doing extra training instead) but ultimately I'm very bored. When I do get work I can generally finish it very quickly and then end up waiting for hours on feedback. I don't get any satisfaction from the work or really enjoy it compared to my last position, although I've heard that promotions are easier from this new department (you get a bit more FaceTime with the higher-ups).

I spoke to my old supervisor who said they tried to keep me and would have me back and he'll try to bring it up with resourcing when he can although nothing might happen. I've since found out that 3 members of my old department would love to switch into my new position and I would love to go back. I don't want to tread on anyones toes here by doing resourcing when it's not at all my job to be involved with it, but it makes sense to me to do a switch. I'm hesitant to bring this up with my old supervisor as the people who want to switch are in his department and I don't want to get them in trouble. I don't want to bring this up with my new supervisor as he's already pretty stressed out. I don't want to go to HR or resourcing directly incase I'm going above peoples heads and get in trouble.

Basically I can sit back and do the work when it arrives and hope for the best, or I can somehow flag it up with someone and I'm just looking for perspectives/ideas.

Cheers.

Ponge on

Posts

  • SygnonSygnon Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    as far as advancement, how do the positions compare?

    b0b11710e1ddcbfc1958f52a53cb7566.png
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    The absolute best thing you can do in this situation is pester, pester, pester. The squeaky wheel gets greased after all.

    However there is an alternative. Approach your current supervisor/HR and ask for a hefty pay-raise for doing this new job as it wasn't what you agreed to do. Sure your contract might say "you can do anything here that we all agree on!" but that really doesn't mean anything if you're unhappy. Be prepared to be let go, but at least if you are let go you can get paid to look for a job you like more. Maybe apply for your old job again.

    Though the best option is to just nag HR/new supervisor that there is someone from the old department that would like to switch with you.

  • PongePonge Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    I am definitely not in the position to be able to risk my job with demands unfortunately. I was lucky to get a job in the current Market, and the industry is so small that it would look terrible only having a 5 week stint at this place on my cv. I'm ecstatic to work here, it's one of the best companies in the world in my dream profession, I'm just incredibly eager to do a good job and work hard, which is nigh-impossible at the moment.

    I don't know the truth about promotions from this new department. You definitely get more exposure to the bosses, although it's a simpler job. There's kind of a normal progression path that means after 6 months to 1 year of doing entry level work you should progress to a tougher/better job. I really wouldn't mind that in my old position, I'd go nuts doing that in my current position. I'm the kind of person who loves being busy, challenged and learning constantly. I had all that before, not so much now.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Okay, that explains your situation a little better. It just sounded like "I'm bored."

    Does your job have an HR department you can talk to? Just let them know you aren't feeling satisfied by the challenges of your new position and you would absolutely love to go back to your old one. I know how you feel being bored too, it sucks, but hey, you can learn new things too!

  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    I think this is something that you should, actually, be bugging your new supervisor about. Bring it to his attention that you liked your old job, and that there are a few people in your old department who would be willing to switch positions. The supervisors can talk to each other and sort it out themselves. Also, give your old supervisor a heads-up that you mentioned it to new supervisor so he's prepared for it.

  • ThundyrkatzThundyrkatz Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    It sounds like you were permanently transferred to this new position and not just lent over, correct?

    It sounds very odd that your new department was looking for additional staff if you are frequently with out anything productive to do. Maybe there is something big coming down the pipe that they will need you for? 1 week is not much time. (even if it seems like forever if you are bored)

    How does the position that you may get promoted to sound to you? Is that something that would be really good for you? If so, I would suck it up for a year (which is like no time at all) and push hard for the promotion.

    If the promotion is not something you are interested in, and you would prefer to just get back to your old job then you will have to push hard for that. Again, 1 week in the new role, give it some time.

    In the end, you have 2 choices. Stay and make the best of it, or look for another job. Honestly you have been there for 5 weeks, and its your first job out of school. (and your dream company at that?) Be more patient.

  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 a.k.a. Nubmonger/Antaeus#1352, 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion Oakland, CARegistered User regular
    edited November 2010
    It sounds to me like you may be tremendously short-sighted in this situation. You haven't been at the company long enough to determine the relative values of each position, let alone how each job actually works in a vacuum. I can't think of any job that doesn't have peaks and valleys, and you may well have landed into a dream position which provides an opportunity that no other position does, granted you just wait for that one month out of the year where the shit hits the fan and you get that special exposure.

    There is probably a very good reason why people in your old department who have been there longer than you would want to move into your current position.

    If you really are that "bored" and can't fathom taking advantage of the down time, then why don't you just volunteer to help out in your old position while keeping the new one? That way you're seen as a team player who is willing to help out, instead of a whiny bitch who doesn't know how good he has it and just wants out of any situation that isn't to his liking. I'm not saying that's how you look, but given the context you've provided, I'm pretty sure that's how many of your colleagues and perhaps even the higher-ups might see it.

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA no.
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Ponge wrote: »
    I am definitely not in the position to be able to risk my job with demands unfortunately. I was lucky to get a job in the current Market, and the industry is so small that it would look terrible only having a 5 week stint at this place on my cv. I'm ecstatic to work here, it's one of the best companies in the world in my dream profession, I'm just incredibly eager to do a good job and work hard, which is nigh-impossible at the moment.

    I don't know the truth about promotions from this new department. You definitely get more exposure to the bosses, although it's a simpler job. There's kind of a normal progression path that means after 6 months to 1 year of doing entry level work you should progress to a tougher/better job. I really wouldn't mind that in my old position, I'd go nuts doing that in my current position. I'm the kind of person who loves being busy, challenged and learning constantly. I had all that before, not so much now.

    Dude. Buck up. It sounds like they did you a favor. You've only been at the company for five weeks. I wouldn't make any waves, like, at all.

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    edited November 2010
    I think this is something that you should, actually, be bugging your new supervisor about. Bring it to his attention that you liked your old job, and that there are a few people in your old department who would be willing to switch positions. The supervisors can talk to each other and sort it out themselves. Also, give your old supervisor a heads-up that you mentioned it to new supervisor so he's prepared for it.


    disagree strongly. The OP has no idea what went down on the backend with the middle management. Associate Director Al, may have off loaded the OP on Associate Director Bob because he wasn't working out and didn't want to outright shitcan him. Bob may have needed a guy but didn't want Carl from Al's group who would eat his own cock to get onto Bob's team.

    Hell, the entire hire process could have been staged because the VP of HR wouldn't allow Bob to hire externally and Al's current team was full of dumbshits and neckbeards.

    OP, you're a recent grad and a new hire in a tough market. Don't upset the applecart or try to broker a deal with anyone yet.

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • oncelingonceling Registered User
    edited November 2010
    Have the people that want to switch ask their boss (your old boss I assume) to change with you. Just have them say they heard you wanted to come back and they would be happy for the opportunity.

    There's no point them passively aggressively waiting for something to happen, if they want a switch they should just bring it up. A good boss won't get butt hurt by this.

  • FireflashFireflash Montreal, QCRegistered User regular
    edited November 2010
    You've only been in your new department for 1 week. If they asked for 2 more guys on the team it must be because they are expecting a heavier work load pretty soon. You don't just ramp up a team for no reason.

    PSN / XBL: PatParadize
  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    a good way to get promoted more quickly is to take the intiative and improve processes, at least at most places. My office frowns upon that shit.

  • MurphyMurphy Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Here to second/third/whatever the "You haven't been in the position long enough to know" comments, as well as the "If they asked for two people, then clearly there was a need" sentiment.

    And as Inquisitor so astutely noted, you know of several people who would love to move into that position. Why is this? One easy way of figuring out the benefits of this position would be by talking to those people and finding out why they'd love to have the job that you seem so unhappy with (after one week). There has to be a good reason. People don't generally go around switching positions within a company unless there is a benefit to them.

  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    i wouldn't bug anybody at this point, if you've only been there a week, they may not trust you with the more intensive work yet, i know whenever i first started in a new job, and i was doing fuckall for the first month or so while they "let me get situated" or whatever. just tell your new supervisor that you learn a lot better getting your hands dirty (for lack of a better word) and would like some more of the workload. Hopefully he'll either explain what's going on, or give you more work. It's also possible you're in a bit of a slow period, and things pick up later on in the year. hence hiring new people while it's slow.

  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Deebaser and others make good points. Disregard my advice.

  • PookiepooPookiepoo Registered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Deebaser is right on the money. You have literally no idea what is really going on here. All you should be doing is smiling and saying "Yes Sir." Do not ask for a raise. Do not bug anybody. Do not negotiate. Do not try to do work for another department.

    Rules of Thumb:Young, new employee are NOT important. Don't feel like you are. I've seen several great workers get fired because they came in and were a pain in the boss' and HR's asses.

    1) Your job is to make your supervisor's life easier, not harder. Trying to negotiate deals is a thorn in their side.

    2) You are always busy. Don't let anybody think differently. If you aren't kept busy it reflects badly on your supervisor. You are new and will not have a lot of responsibilities for a while. Have some patience.

    3) If a spot opens up in your old department after a year or so and you still feel the same way, perhaps you can discuss a transfer.

    Love,

    | Steam: Pookie | DOTA 2 Pookie |
  • SkySky Registered User
    edited November 2010
    I think you can tell your boss that you would like more work that is more fulfilling, that you want to expand your value as an asset to the company. Say you have work to do, but you feel a bit unfulfilled and want something more.

    If the boss is smart and capable, s/he should be able to work with you and do more with you. If not... well,....

    Sky
    Wannabe writer (war, action, fantasy, history, power struggle), video gamer (strategy, simulation, action), former Soldier.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/skyanimal
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited November 2010
    Sky wrote: »
    I think you can tell your boss that you would like more work that is more fulfilling, that you want to expand your value as an asset to the company. Say you have work to do, but you feel a bit unfulfilled and want something more.

    If the boss is smart and capable, s/he should be able to work with you and do more with you. If not... well,....

    ...I would be glad to take that easy, high-demand job as it beats working retail for a 1/3 of my last salary. OP, go ahead and take the pens, I'll bring my own.

    Excision wrote: »
    My girlfriend is going down tonight!

    Steam:MichaelLC
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