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Getting a job: cramming your programmin

DodgeBlanDodgeBlan Registered User regular
edited January 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So penny arcade: recently I quit an extremely unsatisfying IT admin job and have been applying for new jobs. I had an interview today, passed and now have a technical interview on thursday. Key words mentioned about this technical interview: Java, data structures and algorithms.

I haven't touched a line of code for 6 months, and haven't touched java for about a year.

Now we've all done these technical interviews before, and they were the bane of my existence when I was fresh out of uni. I've got my data structures/algorithms text book and I'm going to cram hard.

my question is this: these technical interviews are fairly uniform, the gotchas and the programming riddles and the various shit. There must be some good online resources for preparing for them. Can anyone recommend anything?

DodgeBlan on
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Posts

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Know how to answer database/datamodel type questions.

    Refresh your memory on sorts.

    Look up common quiz items that interviewers give on your language. Example, "what is overriding and overloading?"

    And try not to sweat it too much, they're usually just obstacles put up to see how you handle them, not just see if you can get them right. Someone cramming and reciting correct answers doesn't come across the same as someone who really understands the issues but maybe made a mistake.

    And when you have a developer working on your code, you want someone that understands, cause we all make mistakes.

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