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Dying Graphics Card? Weird Pictures Inside

sponospono Mining for Nose DiamondsRegistered User regular
So check this out:

BIOS screen:
DSCN1763.jpg

Startup:
DSCN1764.jpg
Spoiler:

Desktop:
DSCN1769.jpg

Display Properties:
DSCN1770.jpg

Notice I have no options for changing the resolution, which leads me to believe either the video card is dead, the PCI-E is dead, or the monitor isn't sending its EDID properly, but I can't figure out how to test these.

I updated the video drivers - no change. I cleaned the dust out of the case - no change.

Specs:
Nvidia 8800GTS 512MB
Windows 7 Pro 64
Abit IP35 Pro
Intel Q6600

Any takers?

spono on
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Posts

  • strebaliciousstrebalicious Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I had a similar problem with my laptop. Most people seemed to think it was a problem with the motherboard (i.e. people that sent theirs in for repair), but I really didn't feel like bothering to fix a three/four year old laptop.

    I would tell you to test it with the onboard video, but I see your MB doesn't have one. Maybe you have an old video card lying around, or have a friend that trusts you enough to let you borrow his?

    camo_sig2.png
  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I've had this happen to me before. In my case, it was corrupt RAM on the graphics card. The fact that you're seeing the artifacting occur before the OS even loads is a pretty good indication that you're not dealing with a software or overheating issue.

    Call up the Manufacturer and see if you can get an RMA. Sadly, you'll pretty much have to replace the card.

    qwlru.png
  • ZxerolZxerol The fullest, most luscious beard. Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Yep, that looks like the VRAM is hosed. My 8800GTX died the same way.

  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Thanks, guys. I have an old 7800GT in a computer I keep at a friend's house that I can use for testing this weekend. Hopefully eVGA's RMA process is relatively painless.

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  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    spono wrote: »
    Thanks, guys. I have an old 7800GT in a computer I keep at a friend's house that I can use for testing this weekend. Hopefully eVGA's RMA process is relatively painless.

    eVGA's one of the best, from what I've gathered. They had a lifetime service agreement for cards back when the 8800 was still being sold, I believe, so hopefully it won't be too much of a hassle for you.

    Also, I forgot to suggest this last night, but you can try to reseat the card, too. If the contacts are dirty, or it became jostled enough to lose contact with the motherboard, you might see the same things. It's pretty unlikely that a properly seated card would experience this, but it's certainly worth a shot to remove the card, carefully spray some compressed air along the PCI-e slot, and then try to reseat it and see if things get better.

    qwlru.png
  • shwaipshwaip Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    The 8800 series is pretty well known for failing like this. Heating/cooling cycles cause the solder bumps to crack and mess up the contacts. You can (maybe) repair it by baking it in the oven. If you search google, it's a pretty common and successful fix.

  • ZxerolZxerol The fullest, most luscious beard. Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    shwaip wrote: »
    The 8800 series is pretty well known for failing like this. Heating/cooling cycles cause the solder bumps to crack and mess up the contacts. You can (maybe) repair it by baking it in the oven. If you search google, it's a pretty common and successful fix.

    Honestly, it's better he take advantage of eVGA's generous replacement policies instead of intentionally voiding his warranty, I think.

  • shwaipshwaip Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    As long as EVGA will replace it, you're right. If they won't for whatever reason, then baking it is cheaper (and more fun?) than a new card.

  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I tried reseating it - no change.

    I've got a support ticket open with eVGA, so now I just have to wait to hear back from them on if I can RMA this thing. Also, I need to figure out how to get my receipt from Fry's. I have the credit card statement with the store and the amount, and I have the original box with the Fry's price sticker, but I can't find the goddamn receipt. Maybe if I take the credit card, box and sticker to Fry's they can scan it and look up the transaction.

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  • FyreWulffFyreWulff Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2011
    They should be able to do it with just your credit card actually.

  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    well, the warranty route was a dead end, so I tried cooking the card

    I removed the HSF assembly, cleaned off the thermal paste, made sure all the thermal pads on the ram and other chips were on the HSF, and put the card in the oven at 385 F for 7 minutes

    7u5.png

    it appears to be alive!

    now I've just gotta find some way to stress test this thing

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  • corky842corky842 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    spono wrote: »
    now I've just gotta find some way to stress test this thing

    http://www.ozone3d.net/benchmarks/fur/

    Darmak wrote: »
    Something is wrong with me
  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Should I let it power cycle a few times to make sure the new thermal paste is set, or just jump right into furmark?

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  • corky842corky842 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Yes, that would probably be a good idea.
    is
    Edit: Also, don't run it until it overheats. It is designed to be more intensive than any real-world scenario, so go ahead and stop it after it gets too hot. (I'm a wuss and stop it at around 80C or so.)

    Darmak wrote: »
    Something is wrong with me
  • SpudgeSpudge Registered User
    edited March 2011
    Do keep in mind that, much like the Xbox towel method, baking your graphics card is a stopgap solution

    There's nothing you can do short of removing the poopy solder and resoldering with good stuff to keep it going. The joints will crack again

    You bought yourself some time but consider putting some cash away for when the card really craps out

    Play With Me
    Spoiler:
  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I'm sure it won't last forever, or even more than a month or two

    I could buy a new 560 TI today, but I'm a cheapass

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