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The Aluminum Foil Hat Thread: Conspiracy Theories

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Posts

  • Captain UltraCaptain Ultra Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I have an online friend whose fiancée is a conspiracy theorist. She's linked me youtube videos of David Icke stuff, like of Bush's eyes "transforming". She's also was diagnosed with schizophrenia several years ago. Its weird seeing it on the outside, because on some level, she realizes that her beliefs are being influenced by her schizophrenia, but she doesn't change her beliefs. She also seems to oscillate between believing Icke, and declaring him "in on it to make other theorists look bad" The friend occasionally seems to be a conspiracy theorist, but I'm not sure how much of that is him being honest, or him trying to comfort her. In any case, his conspiracies are usually a bit more constrained than the Icke stuff. Stuff like "The EU is going to shut down the internet with net neutrality".

    Conspiracies have always had a weird place for me. For about a year back in the 7th/8th grade, before I started paying attention to politics, I was kind of a conspiracy theorist. There is one that I'm tangentially connected to.

    The Franklin Cover-Up alleges that the highest levels of the Republican Party and US Government were aware of and complicit in a child prostitution ring. One of the names mentioned there, Gary Caradori, was the husband of my grade school/middle school teacher (I went to a K-8 school, and she was moved up to the middle school). He was investigating this for the Nebraska state legislature. He died in a plane accident, apparently right before returning to Nebraska with his findings. Both he and his oldest son died.

    My teacher thought there was something to it, but I think she was trying to make sense of losing her husband and son.

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  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    One of my favorite conspiracy theories is the Philadelphia Experiement.

    Basically, the original theory was that the Navy was going for cloaking technology. Bending the light around an object to make it invisible. Trying to do this resulted in some minor side-effects, like people getting trapped in the walls of the vessel. A later experiment somehow resulted in teleportation, though, again, side-effects were not terribly pleasant.

    My interest in it is primarily because it was the subject of a very good novel, Thin Air. (No, not the one about the kid and Mount Everest)

    It might be stretching, but I've always considered the Borealis (from Half-Life 2) to be a reference, at least in part, to this.

  • devCharlesdevCharles Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Lawndart wrote: »
    The implicit but unspoken cultural imperialism underlying the whole "Chariot Of The Gods" school of conspiracy theories and the "but these non-European savages couldn't have built this on their own!" claims that support them never fails to amuse me.

    Building the pyramids for those dirty Egyptians really was the white alien's burden, wot wot.

    I think that's also born out of the large scale misconception that is so often repeated that we have no idea how the Pyramids were built. We actually have some pretty solid ideas.

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  • Erich ZahnErich Zahn So Wangtta~! Remember to [E]ject!Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Yes, but [strike]Nazis[/strike] Ancient Astronaut Theorists ignore all theories that don't involve [strike]Thule[/strike] aliens, and think that they're all lies spread by the [strike]Zionist Occupied[/strike] Government.

  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    To be fair, some of them also feel the same way about stonehenge and other white-built things.

  • AiouaAioua Novus Ordo Seclorum Lord of the ForumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    L|ama wrote: »
    To be fair, some of them also feel the same way about stonehenge and other white-built things.

    No, see, that's a double conspiracy. They know in their hearts it's all a conspiracy and stonehenge was actually built by brown people, so they make up a conspiracy theory that it was built by aliens instead.

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  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    L|ama wrote: »
    Sort of related, but the whole "Jewish slaves built the pyramids" thing annoys me quite a lot. It's completely false, the pyramids were built with home grown Egyptian labour that was only somewhat coerced, most likely (in the same way that tax is being coerced to give away your money).
    [Tycho?] wrote: »
    one of my favorites is number stations

    they're shortwave radio stations of indeterminate origin that broadcast meaningless strings of numbers. They've been around on and off since the 50s. There's been speculation that the were spies sending coded messages to home bases but it seems like a horribly inefficient way of doing things.

    More likely they're long term practical jokes made by really bored people

    You really think long term practical jokes is a more reasonable explanation? I've heard of these stations several times and it always seemed pretty reasonable. Secret, but not a conspiracy. Just a method of encrypting communications for whomever. Good enough way of doing it, less so now with the internet though.

    Yeah numbers stations are/were almost certainly legit and used for espionage. Actually there's an old guy in my physics department who does most of his work about radio stuff, I should ask if he has any interest in or knowledge of them.
    Kalkino wrote: »
    I think we've had this thread before (or something like it), but it is a fun topic I do admit

    The Masons have had a long run here - to this day there is still a bit of anti feeling here and tehre (I've met people back home or online who still believe they are up to something). Franco (dictator of Spain till the 1970s) is probably the most famous of the known anti Masons - he repressed the movement for as long as he could. It was not an uncommon belief amongst Catholics apparently and for a long time it seemed to be a Protestant thing more than anything else. Having spent time in several Lodges (as a child, as my father is a longstanding member) I can assure you the Scottish Rite still have the swords by the door, decorative as they may be.

    My favourite conspiracy theory is from NZ, although I understand some other Settler countries have similar theories. At present and for about half a century it has been accepted in academia/etc that Maori are the first known human settlers of New Zealand. It is also accepted that there has been no definitive proof of human exploration before the Maori (from about 1000AD or so), although sometimes evidence does arise. There was an popular theory up till the early 20th century that there was a predecessor peoples to the Maori - the Moriori, who had been expelled/wiped out - until they inhabited only the Chatham Islands (600-700km from the mainland). Archaeologists, anthropologists and other researchers have proven by all sorts of methods that the Maori and Moriori are the same people (just different tribes) and there has been absolutely no evidence of any other settler population until European contact in the 18th century.

    Now despite the above, there is a belief that previous explorers or settlers beat the Maori, with the usual suspects being Celts, Romans, Chinese or some other mysterious white race. It is also often believed that these peoples were highly advanced (see Stonehenge/Babylonia) and widely spread across the islands. It is also believed that they were wiped out largely by Maori invasion and/or natural disaster, despite their superiority. Finally, it is believed that these truths have been repressed by Academia, the government, the Left, the Maori, etc as it would somehow ruin their plan (s). Now why would it ruin their plans? The reason being that apparently the Maori get treated better than they deserve purely because they were the original human settlers and the later British settlers somehow are less privileged or are second class citizens. If somehow the Maori too were invaders, then perhaps their status would be altered.

    This is an issue because of land and resources primarily. Since the 1980s the government has engaged a series of compensatory agreements with various Maori tribes or sub groups, largely as compensation for broken treaties or other agreements dating back to the 19th century (see similar experiences in the US, Canada and Australia). These settlements go on to this day and currently are rather controversial due to disputes over the ownership or customary use of marine/foreshore land and resources. It is very political as you can imagine and people can get rather worked up.

    Quite a lot of people have a residual belief in the above theories, but are not necessarily anti-semitic/white nationalists etc. The Moirori theory was taught at many schools until after the War

    I actually didn't know that this was bullshit until a year or so ago when I looked up Moriori on wikipedia.

    It is pretty widely believed still I think. Hopefully that won't cause any trouble as the only people who really kick up a fuss seem to be marginal characters, often with links to white supremacy. It is slightly worrying though, but I guess it has not been a priority in schools. But even if it was true, it wouldn't make a jot of difference to any Treaty settlement, as, well, those are based on the Treaty (or customary right), not some nebulous concept of being indigenous

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  • -SPI--SPI- Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Tamin wrote: »
    One of my favorite conspiracy theories is the Philadelphia Experiement.

    Basically, the original theory was that the Navy was going for cloaking technology. Bending the light around an object to make it invisible. Trying to do this resulted in some minor side-effects, like people getting trapped in the walls of the vessel. A later experiment somehow resulted in teleportation, though, again, side-effects were not terribly pleasant.

    My interest in it is primarily because it was the subject of a very good novel, Thin Air. (No, not the one about the kid and Mount Everest)

    It might be stretching, but I've always considered the Borealis (from Half-Life 2) to be a reference, at least in part, to this.

    I love the Philadelphia experiment. Not a very good conspiracy theory but an excellent premise for a sci fi story. That and as a rule ww2 secret projects are cool as shit.

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  • South hostSouth host I obey without question Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    When I was really young, I had a book that was full of odd facts, like weird weather, bizarre world records, stuff like that. At the back of it, it mentioned the Philadelphia Experiment as fact. It wasn't much later that I realized "hey, these guys probably didn't actually go into another dimension and phase into the metal."

    I wish I could remember what book that was.

    Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.
  • LeitnerLeitner Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Tamin wrote: »
    One of my favorite conspiracy theories is the Philadelphia Experiement.

    Basically, the original theory was that the Navy was going for cloaking technology. Bending the light around an object to make it invisible. Trying to do this resulted in some minor side-effects, like people getting trapped in the walls of the vessel. A later experiment somehow resulted in teleportation, though, again, side-effects were not terribly pleasant.

    My interest in it is primarily because it was the subject of a very good novel, Thin Air. (No, not the one about the kid and Mount Everest)

    It might be stretching, but I've always considered the Borealis (from Half-Life 2) to be a reference, at least in part, to this.
    Wikipedia wrote:
    The U.S. Navy maintains that no such experiment occurred, and details of the story contradict well-established facts about the Eldridge, as well as the known laws of physics.[4]

    Best order.

  • Fartacus_the_MightyFartacus_the_Mighty Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I remember exploring a conspiracy website once while I was bored in my high school computer class.

    I don't remember the conspiracy itself, but the guy actually tried to rationalize its existence by claiming that "if the government admits to it, it's true. If the government denies it, then you know they're lying and it's true."

  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I remember exploring a conspiracy website once while I was bored in my high school computer class.

    I don't remember the conspiracy itself, but the guy actually tried to rationalize its existence by claiming that "if the government admits to it, it's true. If the government denies it, then you know they're lying and it's true."
    Isn't that basically SOP for every conspiracy theory? Or even the more generalised form; if the alleged conspirators deny it, it must be true but obviously if they admit to it they can't be lying then, either.

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  • Edith_Bagot-DixEdith_Bagot-Dix Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    -SPI- wrote: »
    Lawndart wrote: »

    The implicit but unspoken cultural imperialism underlying the whole "Chariot Of The Gods" school of conspiracy theories and the "but these non-European savages couldn't have built this on their own!" claims that support them never fails to amuse me.

    Building the pyramids for those dirty Egyptians really was the white alien's burden, wot wot.
    I want to see a documentary where two professors, one egyptian and one mexican go around europe and posit theories of how aliens actually built all the largest cathedrals.

    This would be the greatest thing ever.

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  • MyDcmbrMyDcmbr Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Newest one I have heard is that since the Govt can't take away people's guns, they are restricting the amount of ammo companies make to drive the price up so high that people can't afford to buy it thus making the guns useless.

    !!!

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  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I don't know if this counts, but the Nephilim Resistance Taskforce was pretty rad.

    http://members.aol.com/rckrol308/

    Gone now, and haven't had any success retrieving it from the wayback machine as yet.

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  • autono-wally, erotibot300autono-wally, erotibot300 love machine Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    -SPI- wrote: »
    Lawndart wrote: »

    The implicit but unspoken cultural imperialism underlying the whole "Chariot Of The Gods" school of conspiracy theories and the "but these non-European savages couldn't have built this on their own!" claims that support them never fails to amuse me.

    Building the pyramids for those dirty Egyptians really was the white alien's burden, wot wot.
    I want to see a documentary where two professors, one egyptian and one mexican go around europe and posit theories of how aliens actually built all the largest cathedrals.
    That actually sounds totally awesome

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  • NoughtNought Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    dojango wrote: »
    In the 1830's there was a national political party that ran on a platform of ending Masonic control of the US. It was called, oddly enough, the Anti-Masonic Party. They didn't do so well, failing in their major goal of keeping Jackson (a high-ranking Mason) from beating John Q. Adams, but in the long run, they seem to have achieved their goals. Perhaps they never really disbanded in 1833 and went underground, establishing a secret society dedicated to fighting the Free Masons?

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  • Grey PaladinGrey Paladin Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I feel that conspiracy theories are so prevalent in the US because the government and/or large official bodies did do a lot of fucked up things to its own citizens in years past, which developed an unhealthy sense of paranoia in the public.

    Unethical human experimentation in the United States and MK ULTRA should give you plenty of reading material.

    Some selected quotes from the links:
    Wikipedia wrote:
    From 1946 to 1953, at the Walter E. Fernald State School in Massachusetts, in an experiment sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Quaker Oats corporation, 73 mentally disabled children were fed oatmeal containing radioactive calcium and other radioisotopes, in order to track "how nutrients were digested". The children were not told that they were being fed radioactive chemicals and were told by hospital staff and researchers that they were joining a "science club".


    From 1950 through 1953, the US Army sprayed toxic chemicals over 6 cities in the United States and Canada, in order to test dispersal patterns of chemical weapons. Army records stated that the chemicals which were sprayed on the city of Winnipeg, Canada, included zinc cadmium sulfide.


    Once Project MKULTRA officially got underway in April, 1953, experiments included administering LSD to CIA employees, military personnel, doctors, other government agents, prostitutes, mentally ill patients, and members of the general public in order to study their reactions. LSD and other drugs were usually administered without the subject's knowledge or informed consent, a violation of the Nuremberg Code that the U.S. agreed to follow after World War II.

    Efforts to "recruit" subjects were often illegal, even though actual use of LSD was legal in the United States until October 6, 1966. In Operation Midnight Climax, the CIA set up several brothels in San Francisco, CA to obtain a selection of men who would be too embarrassed to talk about the events. The men were dosed with LSD, the brothels were equipped with two-way mirrors, and the sessions were filmed for later viewing and study.


    ...The experiments were exported to Canada when the CIA recruited Scottish psychiatrist Donald Ewen Cameron, creator of the "psychic driving" concept, which the CIA found particularly interesting. Cameron had been hoping to correct schizophrenia by erasing existing memories and reprogramming the psyche. He commuted from Albany, New York to Montreal every week to work at the Allan Memorial Institute of McGill University and was paid $69,000 from 1957 to 1964 to carry out MKULTRA experiments there. In addition to LSD, Cameron also experimented with various paralytic drugs as well as electroconvulsive therapy at thirty to forty times the normal power. His "driving" experiments consisted of putting subjects into drug-induced coma for weeks at a time (up to three months in one case) while playing tape loops of noise or simple repetitive statements. His experiments were typically carried out on patients who had entered the institute for minor problems such as anxiety disorders and postpartum depression, many of whom suffered permanently from his actions. His treatments resulted in victims' incontinence, amnesia, forgetting how to talk, forgetting their parents, and thinking their interrogators were their parents

    ...It was during this era that Cameron became known worldwide as the first chairman of the World Psychiatric Association as well as president of the American and Canadian psychiatric associations. Cameron had also been a member of the Nuremberg medical tribunal in 1946–47.

    "All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible." - T.E. Lawrence
  • MagicPrimeMagicPrime "We're ready to believe you..." FireSideWizardRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    We had a chat about MK Ultra and LSD back on the first few pages.

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  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.

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  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Torso Boy wrote: »
    Lawndart wrote: »
    Deadfall wrote: »

    Oh, that's nothing.

    I see your so-called face of madness and raise you...

    TIMECUBE!

    Gaze upon my link, ye sane, and despair.

    The scariest fucking thing is at the bottom, there's a link to the next page.

    No fucking way. I've been scoping timecube for YEARS and never knew there was an even deeper untapped vein in the CrazyMine.

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    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • glithertglithert Snortin' K Luthor's towerRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    That's because you're educated stupid

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  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Modern Man wrote: »
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.

    The thing that's funny about this is the idea that powerful people would never associate with one another and if they do, CONSPIRACY!

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Not exactly a conspiracy theory per-say, but my favorite crazies atm are the EM radiation people. No, Wifi is not giving you headaches/respiratory problems/anal cancer.

    But I was using wifi for twelve hours yesterday, and suddenly my poop was a funny color. How do you explain that, huh, smart guy?

    No more "Smurf Ice Cream" for you, mister!

    sigthree.png
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Modern Man wrote: »
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.

    Nixon described the club best.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPb-PN9F2Pc

  • devCharlesdevCharles Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Yeah, they bring in a bunch of artists and musicians from San Francisco.

    That should probably tell you all you need to know about what occurs at the Bohemian Grove.

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  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I like how it being the "Faggiest thing that you could goddamn imagine", doesn't keep him from "attending it from time to time".

  • BehemothBehemoth Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Modern Man wrote: »
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.
    * "The Bohemian Grove, that I attend from time to time—the Easterners and the others come there—but it is the most faggy goddamn thing you could ever imagine, that San Francisco crowd that goes in there; it's just terrible! I mean I won't shake hands with anybody from San Francisco."—President Richard M. Nixon on the Watergate tapes, Bohemian Club member starting in 1953.[15]

    * "If I were to choose the speech that gave me the most pleasure and satisfaction in my political career, it would be my Lakeside Speech at the Bohemian Grove in July 1967. Because this speech traditionally was off the record it received no publicity at the time. But in many important ways it marked the first milestone on my road to the presidency."—President Richard Nixon, Memoirs (1978).[15]

    Ahahahahahaha

    iQbUbQsZXyt8I.png
  • OctoparrotOctoparrot Registered User
    edited February 2011
    Wikipedia wrote:
    Cameron had also been a member of the Nuremberg medical tribunal in 1946–47.

    Goddamn that asshole had some brass balls.


    Now, regarding these claims of Icke's [alleged] schizophrenia and the tangential stories, like Captain Ultra's friend's fiancee. If you haven't heard of Will Elliott, he's basically followed a similar path to Icke's. Ian Punnett interviewed him a few weeks ago. It was actually kind of depressing. He was doing fine on medication, in respect to his writing output. But he'd stop taking it because of the weight gain and mental fuzziness, thinking he could beat the delusions on hiw own. Then he started weaving the medication into his conspiracies as well. At one point he admits he has no way to prove any of his beliefs, but is adamant that he's correct.
    Will Elliott ... believes he was wrongly (perhaps even purposely) diagnosed with schizophrenia after becoming aware of the false Matrix-like reality around him. Elliott recalled first noticing an anomaly in his reality as a child, when he saw the eyes of a primary school teacher momentarily morph into slotted eyes. Later, Elliot said he began receiving mind control messages directed to him through the television, following his discovery of a subliminal soft drink ad campaign at a local store.

    ...Elliott acknowledged that his story is problematic for those still deluded by the Matrix reality, including many psychiatrists, who conclude such awakened people are mentally ill and in need of medication. "Psychiatry has been established as a gate keeping force to keep people in the Matrix reality, where we are regarded as a human resource by those who run this Matrix and run this world," he explained.

    Notice the very striking similarity to David Icke's theories.

    the GOP shouldn't give a rats ass about them since they won't vote for them. If someone won't vote for you they might as well not exist.
  • LucidLucid Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Modern Man wrote: »
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.
    Jon Ronson does an episode about Bohemian grove with Alex Jones. Alex and some cohort infiltrate(casually walk through the forest) and tape it with a hidden camera. They claim they see babies being sacrificed or something but it's just some ridiculous frat party like performance. Their footage reflects that but I guess they can't just shrug their shoulders about it.

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  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Lucid wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

    A not-so-secret club that might well be running the world. Or, at the very least, its members are making some really important decisions while drunk and peeing in the woods.
    Jon Ronson does an episode about Bohemian grove with Alex Jones. Alex and some cohort infiltrate(casually walk through the forest) and tape it with a hidden camera. They claim they see babies being sacrificed or something but it's just some ridiculous frat party like performance. Their footage reflects that but I guess they can't just shrug their shoulders about it.

    LMAO. I just went to infowars.com and there was an ad for Super Natural Silver, AN INTERNAL SUPPLEMENT OF SILVER! JESUS FUCKING CHRIST.

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    Newest one I have heard is that since the Govt can't take away people's guns, they are restricting the amount of ammo companies make to drive the price up so high that people can't afford to buy it thus making the guns useless.

    Just how much ammo is the average household using anyway? I know a box of bullets isn't exactly something you take a loan out for, but unless the average person is blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year I'm confused how this would ever be feasible.

    Like, it doesn't even hold up to glancing attention.

    And anyone blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year is probably on a government watch list already anyway. >.>

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  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Forar wrote: »
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    Newest one I have heard is that since the Govt can't take away people's guns, they are restricting the amount of ammo companies make to drive the price up so high that people can't afford to buy it thus making the guns useless.

    Just how much ammo is the average household using anyway? I know a box of bullets isn't exactly something you take a loan out for, but unless the average person is blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year I'm confused how this would ever be feasible.

    Like, it doesn't even hold up to glancing attention.

    And anyone blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year is probably on a government watch list already anyway. >.>
    People who target shoot use up plenty of ammo. I probably went through at least a thousand rounds last year, and I only shoot once a month or so.

    But there was a bit of an ammo shortage there for a while. But that's because the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were leading to a large increase in the military's use of ammo.

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  • Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Deadfall wrote: »

    I saw this thread and was going to post this if nobody else did.

    This has always been my favorite pants-on-head grade crazy.

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  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Forar wrote: »
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    Newest one I have heard is that since the Govt can't take away people's guns, they are restricting the amount of ammo companies make to drive the price up so high that people can't afford to buy it thus making the guns useless.

    Just how much ammo is the average household using anyway? I know a box of bullets isn't exactly something you take a loan out for, but unless the average person is blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year I'm confused how this would ever be feasible.

    Like, it doesn't even hold up to glancing attention.

    And anyone blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year is probably on a government watch list already anyway. >.>

    Every couple of weeks one of the neighbors will unload a couple magazines in their yard for fun. There's also a couple of shooting ranges within 20 miles of here. I can't imagine those places staying open if they didn't have regular customers.

  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    MKR wrote: »
    Forar wrote: »
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    Newest one I have heard is that since the Govt can't take away people's guns, they are restricting the amount of ammo companies make to drive the price up so high that people can't afford to buy it thus making the guns useless.

    Just how much ammo is the average household using anyway? I know a box of bullets isn't exactly something you take a loan out for, but unless the average person is blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year I'm confused how this would ever be feasible.

    Like, it doesn't even hold up to glancing attention.

    And anyone blowing through hundreds or thousands of rounds of ammo per year is probably on a government watch list already anyway. >.>

    Every couple of weeks one of the neighbors will unload a couple magazines in their yard for fun. There's also a couple of shooting ranges within 20 miles of here. I can't imagine those places staying open if they didn't have regular customers.


    Certain ammo types are still dirt cheap. Even one one on a budget can afford to regularly shoot .22 and shotguns.

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  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Oh, no doubt that there is a demand, but a gun range is going to be buying bulk and be a known location of use and distribution, and a spike of usage here and there is one thing. Assuming that the government is trying to price people out of being able to own guns through ammo is batshit crazy.

    A quick google search shows that apparently cartridges can have a shelf life in the decades or longer if properly stored. Just how many rounds is enough?

    Note: not trying to turn this into a gun thread, but even a casual or regular user must recognize that having a box or twelve tucked away oughta give the average person enough firepower to hold 'em over just about anything short of the apocalypse.

    ... wait, I think I just found where I missed something.

    sigthree.png
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Deebaser wrote: »
    Torso Boy wrote: »
    Lawndart wrote: »
    Deadfall wrote: »

    Oh, that's nothing.

    I see your so-called face of madness and raise you...

    TIMECUBE!

    Gaze upon my link, ye sane, and despair.

    The scariest fucking thing is at the bottom, there's a link to the next page.

    No fucking way. I've been scoping timecube for YEARS and never knew there was an even deeper untapped vein in the CrazyMine.

    I, for one, I was not aware the Timecube dude was also extremely racist.
    All past Great Civilizations have been destroyed by minorities, so welcome to BLACK America - the white race now destroyed by the power hungry money grabbing politicition's edict that any white complaint is racist and induces fines and jail time for white objectors. The U.S. Government is now antiwhite.


    I haven't read the book myself, but I heard an interview from the author of Voodoo Histories where he talked about how people cling to conspiracy theories because they offer up easier explinations than real life. It's easier to digest that our government allowed 9/11 to happen than it is to understand the actual decades long senario with hundreds of players and influences that eventually culminated in the attacks. In some weird way, lizard people is an easier explination for why the world is fucked up than understanding the real problems of the human condition.

  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Forar wrote: »
    Oh, no doubt that there is a demand, but a gun range is going to be buying bulk and be a known location of use and distribution, and a spike of usage here and there is one thing. Assuming that the government is trying to price people out of being able to own guns through ammo is batshit crazy.

    A quick google search shows that apparently cartridges can have a shelf life in the decades or longer if properly stored. Just how many rounds is enough?

    Note: not trying to turn this into a gun thread, but even a casual or regular user must recognize that having a box or twelve tucked away oughta give the average person enough firepower to hold 'em over just about anything short of the apocalypse.

    ... wait, I think I just found where I missed something.

    The only indoor range around here sells reloads, thus increasing profit. Also, relaods are cheap and easy(ish), so limiting boxed ammo sales probably won't affect the hard core gun crowd.

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  • RiemannLivesRiemannLives Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Lawndart wrote: »
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    *snip*

    The implicit but unspoken cultural imperialism underlying the whole "Chariot Of The Gods" school of conspiracy theories and the "but these non-European savages couldn't have built this on their own!" claims that support them never fails to amuse me.

    Building the pyramids for those dirty Egyptians really was the white alien's burden, wot wot.

    Wait, but usually the very same crazy people who think aliens built the Pyramids also think they built the megalithic monuments in Wiltshire (Stonehenge, Avebury etc...) and other parts of northwest Europe.

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