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Getting passed over for a promotion: How to bring it up?

KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
edited February 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So there's been a bunch of new hirees at my work, and it turns out they're creating an entire new team (which will be doing work very similar to my own). Naturally they hired new managers as well, who are actually training with my manager right now. I'm pretty annoyed for some reasons:

1) I made it clear before that I'm interested in any oportunities to move up, and these positions weren't even brought up to anyone in our team.

2) I always gotten great marks on reviews and what not, my work has been praised and I'm constantly being told that the moment something came up I would be recommended for it. During my year end review my manager and I discussed how more oportunities we needed in order to raise morale.

3) I always end up training new folks, and currently training some people who are going to be making up this team.

I'm my mind I feel I'm qualified to have at least been interviewed/notified of this position. Naturally my manager may have disagreed, but if she did I want to know what I'm doing wrong and what can I improve. What's the best way to bring this up without sounding like I'm bitching?

Kyougu on
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Posts

  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Ask her for a meeting and voice your concerns. Be up front about it and don't try and dodge around it.

    You're not going to make it sound like you're not bitching, because you kinda are.

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  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Broach the subject with the person in charge. I mean you can probably say it pretty much like "Hi (name), I was doing some research and saw that you're starting a new team and hiring all new managers. I'd really like the opportunity and challenges in being with that team. Is there any reason you wouldn't consider me for it?"

    Most of the time it's as simple as, they forgot, they didn't even know directly (your manager never told them) or your manager is keeping you in his department because you're so good. You may want to speak to HR and ask them why they're hiring outside when they have talent inside to fill the respective roles. No need to be crass or anything crazy, just be honest and firm with the person in charge.

  • dzenithdzenith Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    How did the people that got the manager job find out about it?

  • witch_iewitch_ie Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I would recommend talking to your boss about how you can better manage your career. From your description it sounds like you should have been watching your company's position listings and applied for a manager position if that's what you wanted. It's not really your manager's job to notify you of other job opportunities. Had you applied, maybe you would have gotten an interview or could have asked for a recommendation.

  • skeldareskeldare Defaulting Bravely Gresham, ORRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Do you have any management experience? It's possible that was the main reason you were overlooked. But it would never hurt to bring it up and find out exactly why.

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  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    If they are not going to treat you with respect, maybe try scouting around for another job?

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  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    When I was promoted to my current position, when the opportunity started to present itself I started to talk to my boss about it and made it clear that I was interested in both the position and the future of the company. During my annual review, he said "I'm going to offer you a promotion, and I'm happy you made it more clear that you were interested because I wasn't sure what your view on your work here was."

    Currently they're hiring a manager position and I've made it even more clear that I want the position, especially considering I now have an MBA. BUT they waited too long, and I'm relocating, so they missed out. But in both situations, it was about showing that you were qualified and remaining engaged with your boss so they're aware that you're interested. They won't give the position to someone who simply expects it. I'm not saying you expect it, but you almost need to be annoying about it -- "Hey boss, has there been any news on [position]?" And ask questions about it -- "Hey, that position you were talking about -- does it require [skills]? I was just reading up on that, it seems like really interesting stuff."

    Oh, ultimately my point is that for this particular position, the ship may have sailed. That doesn't mean you can't bring it up and see if you can figure out why you were passed over.

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  • iconduckiconduck Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    What I've found (in companies with highly competitive cultures, at least) is that you will never get promoted unless you're already doing the job you want to get promoted to, and doing it very well. This applies to anything important, but most notably to management roles. Teams are an extremely expensive resource, and putting that resource under the control of a person with no proven ability to manage that resource is a gigantic risk.

    From that perspective, your company's actions seem entirely reasonable. Your manager, on the other hand, is a dick. Given the extremely limited information you've presented, I'd say your manager is just saying whatever it takes to make you happy, and talking to him/her about it won't do anything but make you feel better. The company obviously doesn't consider you suitable for the position, and a good manager will tell you why and how you can make yourself suitable for the next opportunity.

    My advice would be to look for ways to expand your scope in a way that directly benefits the company. Don't waste your time on soft/fuzzy stuff. Find something that needs to be fixed and convince a few peers to help you fix it. Initiative and impact are key.

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