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[Comics News] IV: The Voyage Home

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Posts

  • DelduwathDelduwath Registered User regular
    I thought this would be worth sharing: Jess Nevins (the guy who's done those exhaustive League of Extraordinary Gentlemen annotations, among other things) wants to create an encyclopedia of Golden Age superheroes, and he's turned to Kickstarter for funding:
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1651697370/the-encyclopedia-of-golden-age-superheroes

    I'm not sure what price point to donate at yet. I think this is a very worth-while endeavor, and want to help out, but I also want a print copy of the book, and print copies are only rewards for the $100 or higher price points; I'm not sure if I want to spend that much. I'll definitely throw something in eventually, though.

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  • AntimatterAntimatter Registered User regular
    oh wow

  • AntimatterAntimatter Registered User regular
    If I raise $6,000, I will make the entire manuscript free online, as a professionally designed web site, similar to The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. You'll be able to buy copies of the book as print-on-demand, but it will be permanently available, for free, to the world.

  • TexiKenTexiKen Let's have fun out there. Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    2012 Eisner List
    Best Short Story

    “A Brief History of the Art Form Known as Hortisculpture,” by Adrian Tomine, in Optic Nerve #12 (Drawn & Quarterly)
    “Harvest of Fear,” by Jim Woodring, in The Simpsons’ Treehouse of Horror #17 (Bongo)
    “The Phototaker,” by Guy Davis, in Metal Hurlant vol. 2 (Humanoids)
    “The Seventh,” by Darwyn Cooke, in Richard Stark’s Parker: The Martini Edition (IDW)
    “The Speaker,” by Brandon Graham, in Dark Horse Presents #7 (Dark Horse)

    Best Single Issue (or One-Shot)

    Daredevil #7, by Mark Waid, Paolo Rivera, and Joe Rivera (Marvel)
    Ganges #4, by Kevin Huizenga (Fantagraphics)
    Locke & Key: Guide to the Known Keys, by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez (IDW)
    Princeless #3,by Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin (Action Lab)
    The Unwritten #24: “Stairway to Heaven” by Mike Carey, Peter Gross, and Al Davison (Vertigo/DC)


    Best Continuing Series
    Daredevil, by Mark Waid, Marcos Martin, Paolo Rivera, and Joe Rivera (Marvel)
    Naoki Urasawa’s 20th Century Boys, by Naoki Urasawa (VIZ Media)
    Rachel Rising, by Terry Moore (Abstract Studio)
    Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, by Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli (Marvel)
    Usagi Yojimbo, by Stan Sakai (Dark Horse)


    Best Limited Series

    Atomic Robo and the Ghost of Station X, by Brian Clevinger and Scott Wegener (Red 5)
    Criminal: The Last of the Innocent, by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Marvel Icon)
    Flashpoint: Batman—Knight of Vengeance, by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso (Vertigo/DC)
    The New York Five, by Brian Wood and Ryan Kelly (Vertigo/DC)
    Who Is Jake Ellis? by Nathan Edmondson & Tonci Zonjic(Image)


    Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 7)

    Beauty and the Squat Bears, by Émile Bravo (Yen Press)
    Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking, by Philippe Coudray (Candlewick/Toon Books)
    Dragon Puncher Island, by James Kochalka (Top Shelf)
    Nursery Rhyme Comics, edited by Chris Duffy (First Second)
    Patrick in a Teddy Bear’s Picnic, by Geoffrey Hayes(Candlewick/Toon Books)



    Best Publication for Kids (ages 8–12)

    The All-New Batman: The Brave and the Bold, by Sholly Fisch, Rick Burchett, and Dan Davis (DC)
    Amelia Rules: The Meaning of Life . . . And Other Stuff, by Jimmy Gownley (Atheneum)
    The Ferret’s a Foot, by Colleen AF Venable and Stephanie Yue (Graphic Universe/Lerner)
    Princeless, by Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin (Action Lab)
    Snarked, by Roger Langridge (kaboom!)
    Zita the Space Girl, by Ben Hatke(First Second)


    Best Publication for Young Adults (Ages 12–17)

    Anya’s Ghost, by Vera Brosgol (First Second)
    Around the World, by Matt Phelan (Candlewick)
    Level Up, by Gene Yang and Thien Pham (First Second)
    Life with Archie, by Paul Kupperberg, Fernando Ruiz, Pat & Tim Kennedy, Norm Breyfogle et al. (Archie)
    Mystic, by G. Willow Wilson and David Lopez (Marvel)


    Best Anthology

    Dark Horse Presents, edited by Mike Richardson (Dark Horse)
    Nelson, edited by Rob Davis and Woodrow Phoenix (Blank Slate)
    Nursery Rhyme Comics, edited by Chris Duffy (First Second)
    The Someday Funnies, edited by Michel Choquette (Abrams ComicArts)
    Yiddishkeit: Jewish Vernacular and the New Land, edited by Harvey Pekar and Paul Buhle (Abrams ComicArts)


    Best Humor Publication

    The Art of Doug Sneyd: A Collection of Playboy Cartoons (Dark Horse Books)
    Chimichanga, by Eric Powell (Dark Horse)
    Coffee: It’s What’s for Dinner, by Dave Kellett (Small Fish)
    Kinky & Cosy, by Nix (NBM)
    Milk & Cheese: Dairy Products Gone Bad, by Evan Dorkin (Dark Horse Books)


    Best Digital Comic

    Bahrain, by Josh Neufeld, www.cartoonmovement.com/comic/24
    Battlepug, by Mike Norton, www.battlepug.com
    Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant, by Tony Cliff,www.delilahdirk.com
    Outfoxed, by Dylan Meconis, www.dylanmeconis.com/outfoxed
    Sarah and the Seed, by Ryan Andrews,www.ryan-a.com/comics/sarahandtheseed01.htm


    Best Reality-Based Work

    Around the World, by Matt Phelan (Candlewick)
    Green River Killer: A True Detective Story, by Jeff Jensen and Jonathan Case (Dark Horse Books)
    Marzi: A Memoir, by Marzena Sowa and Sylvain Savoia (Vertigo/DC)
    Onward Towards Our Noble Deaths, by Shigeru Mizuki (Drawn & Quarterly)
    Vietnamerica, by GB Tran (Villard)


    Best Graphic Album—New

    Bubbles & Gondola, by Renaud Dillies (NBM)
    Freeway, by Mark Kalesniko (Fantagraphics)
    Habibi, by Craig Thompson (Pantheon)
    Ivy, by Sarah Olekysk (Oni)
    Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand, adapted by Ramón K. Pérez (Archaia)
    One Soul, by Ray Fawkes (Oni)


    Best Graphic Album—Reprint

    Big Questions, by Anders Nilsen (Drawn & Quarterly)
    The Death Ray, by Dan Clowes (Drawn & Quarterly)
    Richard Stark’s Parker: The Martini Edition, by Darwyn Cooke (IDW)
    WE3: The Deluxe Edition, by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely (Vertigo/DC)
    Zahra’s Paradise, by Amir and Khalil (First Second)


    Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips

    Flash Gordon and Jungle Jim, by Alex Raymond and Don Moore, edited by Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
    Forgotten Fantasy: Sunday Comics 1900–1915, edited by Peter Maresca (Sunday Press)
    Prince Valiant vols. 3-4, by Hal Foster, edited by Kim Thompson (Fantagraphics)
    Tarpé Mills’s Miss Fury Sensational Sundays, 1944–1949, edited by Trina Robbins (IDW/Library of American Comics)
    Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse vols. 1-2, by Floyd Gottfredson, edited by David Gerstein and Gary Groth (Fantagraphics)


    Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books

    Government Issue: Comics for the People: 1940s–2000s, edited by Richard L. Graham (Abrams ComicArts)
    The MAD Fold-In Collection, by Al Jaffee(Chronicle)
    PS Magazine: The Best of Preventive Maintenance Monthly, by Will Eisner (Abrams ComicArts)
    The Sugar and Spike Archives, vol. 1, by Sheldon Mayer (DC)
    Walt Simonson’s The Mighty Thor Artist’s Edition (IDW)


    Best U.S. Edition of International Material

    Bubbles & Gondola, by Renaud Dillies (NBM)
    Isle of 100,000 Graves, by Fabien Vehlmann and Jason (Fantagraphics)
    Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot, by Jacques Tardi and Jean-Patrick Manchette (Fantagraphics)
    The Manara Library,vol. 1: Indian Summer and Other Stories, by Milo Manara with Hugo Pratt (Dark Horse Books)
    Night Animals: A Diptych About What Rushes Through the Bushes, by Brecht Evens (Top Shelf)


    Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia

    A Bride’s Story, by Kaoru Mori (Yen Press)
    Drops of God, by Tadashi Agi and Shu Okimoto(Vertical)
    Onward Towards Our Noble Deaths, by Shigeru Mizuki (Drawn & Quarterly)
    Saturn Apartments, vols. 3-4, byHisae Iwaoka (VIZ Media)
    Stargazing Dog, by Takashi Murakami (NBM)
    Wandering Son, vol. 1, by Shimura Takako (Fantagraphics)



    Best Writer

    Cullen Bunn, The Sixth Gun (Oni)
    Mike Carey, The Unwritten (Vertigo/DC)
    Jeff Jensen, Green River Killer: A True Detective Story (Dark Horse Books)
    Jeff Lemire, Animal Man, Flashpoint: Frankenstein and the Creatures of the Unknown, Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. (DC); Sweet Tooth (Vertical/DC)
    Mark Waid, Irredeemable, Incorruptible (BOOM!); Daredevil (Marvel)


    Best Writer/Artist

    Rick Geary, The Lives of Sacco and Vanzetti (NBM)
    Terry Moore, Rachel Rising (Abstract Studio)
    Sarah Oleksyk, Ivy (Oni)
    Craig Thompson, Habibi (Pantheon)
    Jim Woodring, Congress of the Animals (Fantagraphics), “Harvest of Fear,” in The Simpsons’ Treehouse of Horror #17 (Bongo)


    Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team

    Michael Allred, iZombie (Vertigo/DC); Madman All-New Giant-Size Super-Ginchy Special (Image)
    Ramón K. Pérez, Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand (Archaia)
    Chris Samnee, Captain America and Bucky, Ultimate Spider-Man #155 (Marvel)
    Marcos Martin, Daredevil (Marvel)
    Paolo Rivera/Joe Rivera, Daredevil (Marvel)


    Best Cover Artist

    Michael Allred, iZombie (Vertigo/DC)
    Francesco Francavilla, Black Panther (Marvel); Lone Ranger, Lone Ranger/Zorro, Dark Shadows, Warlord of Mars (Dynamite); Archie Meets Kiss (Archie)
    Victor Kalvachev, Blue Estate (Image)
    Marcos Martin, Daredevil, Amazing Spider-Man (Marvel)
    Sean Phillips, Criminal: The Last of the Innocent (Marvel Icon)
    Yuko Shimizu, The Unwritten (Vertigo/DC)


    Best Coloring

    Laura Allred, iZombie (Vertigo/DC); Madman All-New Giant-Size Super-Ginchy Special (Image)
    Bill Crabtree, The Sixth Gun (Oni)
    Ian Herring and Ramón K. Pérez, Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand (Archaia)
    Victor Kalvachev, Blue Estate (Image)
    Chris Peter, Casanova: Avaritia, Casanova: Gula (Marvel Icon)


    Best Lettering

    Deron Bennett, Billy Fog, Jim Henson’s Dark Crystal, Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand, Mr. Murder Is Dead (Archaia); Helldorado, Puss N Boots,Richie Rich (APE Entertainment)
    Jimmy Gownley, Amelia Rules! The Meaning of Life . . . And Other Stuff (Atheneum)
    Laura Lee Gulledge, Page by Paige (Amulet Books/Abrams)
    Tom Orzechowski, Manara Library, with L. Lois Buholis(Dark Horse); Manga Man (Houghton Mifflin); Savage Dragon (Image)
    Stan Sakai, Usagi Yojimbo (Dark Horse)


    Best Comics-Related Journalism

    The AV Club Comics Panel, by Noel Murray, Oliver Sava et al., www.avclub.com/features/comics-panel/
    The Beat, produced by Heidi MacDonald et al., www.comicsbeat.com
    The Comics Journal, edited by Gary Groth, and The Comics Journal website, www.tcj.com, edited by Timothy Hodler and Dan Nadel (Fantagraphics)
    The Comics Reporter, produced by Tom Spurgeon, www.comicsreporter.com
    TwoMorrows Publications: Alter Ego edited by Roy Thomas, Back Issue edited by Michael Eury,Draw edited by Mike Manley, and Jack Kirby Collector edited by John Morrow


    Best Educational/Academic Work

    Alan Moore: Conversations, ed. by Eric Berlatsky (University Press of Mississippi)
    Cartooning: Philosophy & Practice, by Ivan Brunetti (Yale University Press)
    Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods, edited by Matthew J. Smith and Randy Duncan (Routledge)
    Hand of Fire: The Comics Art of Jack Kirby, by Charles Hatfield (University Press of Mississippi)
    Projections: Comics and the History of 21st Century Storytelling, by Jared Gardner (Stanford University Press)


    Best Comics-Related Book

    Archie: A Celebration of America’s Favorite Teenagers, edited by Craig Yoe (IDW/Yoe Books)
    Caniff: A Visual Biography, edited by Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
    Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising, edited by Rick Marschall and Warren Bernard (Fantagraphics/Marschall Books)
    Genius Isolated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth, designed by Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
    MetaMaus, by Art Spiegelman (Pantheon)


    Best Publication Design

    Genius Isolated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth, designed by Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
    Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand, designed by Eric Skillman (Archaia)
    Kinky & Cosy, designed by Nix (NBM)
    The MAD Fold-In Collection, designed by Michael Morris (Chronicle)
    Richard Stark’s Parker: The Martini Edition, designed by Darwyn Cooke (IDW)

    Scott Snyder was robbed, robbed I tell you!

    Good for DD though, and Mike Carey needs to win for Unwritten this time.

    TexiKen on
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  • UltimateInfernoUltimateInferno Registered User regular
    Ponsor should have gotten a coloring nom

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  • CrimsondudeCrimsondude Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    Delduwath wrote: »
    I thought this would be worth sharing: Jess Nevins (the guy who's done those exhaustive League of Extraordinary Gentlemen annotations, among other things) wants to create an encyclopedia of Golden Age superheroes, and he's turned to Kickstarter for funding:
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1651697370/the-encyclopedia-of-golden-age-superheroes

    I'm not sure what price point to donate at yet. I think this is a very worth-while endeavor, and want to help out, but I also want a print copy of the book, and print copies are only rewards for the $100 or higher price points; I'm not sure if I want to spend that much. I'll definitely throw something in eventually, though.

    Have you seen Fantastic Victoriana? That's a bargain considering FV is a beast tome and these are rather unique but of limited appeal.

    I'm still waiting for the pulp one, too. But this will be amazing as well. Jess is an amazing and enjoyable author.

    Crimsondude on
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Dang, no Hickman FF in the continuing series? No Tiny Titans or Marvel Adventures titles in any age group?

    Least Atomic Robo and Locke and Key got a bit of love!

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
  • CrimsondudeCrimsondude Registered User regular
    Daredevil is going to clean up.

  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    I sincerely hope it does. Then Marvel's going to plaster covers with Eisner-winning badges.

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  • BionicPenguinBionicPenguin Registered User regular
    Let me just say that Dragon Puncher Island is a fantastic name.

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    Steam: MightyPotatoKing/King of the Impossible - Battle.net: PotatoKing#1893
  • TexiKenTexiKen Let's have fun out there. Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    March Sales charts. Marvel won dollars and units again, by 6 % and 3 % respectively over DC. and got three books in the top 10 this month (take that Aquaman!). Feels odd having AvX #1 count even though it wasn't supposed to be for sale that month.

    Top 10
    AVENGERS VS. X-MEN #1
    AVENGERS VS. X-MEN #0
    JUSTICE LEAGUE #7
    BATMAN #7
    AVENGERS ASSEMBLE #1
    ACTION COMICS #7
    GREEN LANTERN #7
    DETECTIVE COMICS #7
    BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #7
    SUPERMAN #7

    Walking Dead vol. 1 continues to sell forever and ever, I have to think it will replace Watchmen soon as the biggest selling TPB ever evers.

    I wonder where Saga fell on the chart, hopefully icv2's number arrive before Easter.

    TexiKen on
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  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    Graphic.ly ceases digital comics sales.
    Here's eight things that you need to know about the announcement:

    1. Graphicly is going to stop selling digital comics and remove the Graphicly app from the iTunes and Android stores.

    2. If you've purchased comics from Graphicly, you will always be able to re-download those comics, as long as you keep the Graphicly app on your device or visit the website.

    3. The Graphicly apps will not be available for reinstallation.

    4. Your books will not be converted to the new format.

    5. What books are available on the various bookstores will be up to the publisher, not Graphicly.

    6. Soon, you'll be able to access your already purchased library via HTML5 on tablets and phones.

    7. The books will be available on the iBookstore, Kindle, Nook, Facebook, and more.

    8. As such, Graphicly has moved from being a digital comics distributor to an ebooks distributor. They will format and push the books to the various ebookstores instead of providing an app and specifically Graphicly experience.

    Mark Waid discusses the economic realities of publishing via print.
    Mark Waid wrote:
    So...Diamond. Typically, a non-Premier publisher sells its wares to Diamond at 40-45% of cover price. Let’s say 40%. You’re one of those publishers. That means that if your comic is cover-priced at $3.99 (which, at the moment, seems to be the average bottom threshold), you’re making roughly $1.60 per copy. Which actually doesn’t sound too awful, right? Let’s say you’re not a Bendis- or Millar-level sales superstar but neither are you a total unknown, so you’re selling 5000-6000 copies of each issue, very respectable in this day and age. Less if you’re a brand-new creator with no track record among retailers, but for argument’s sake, let’s say 5-6K. That’s, what, eight or nine grand gross?

    But here’s the big bite: at those print-run levels, that comic is costing you around a dollar a copy just to print. Maybe a little more, maybe a little less. What’s that? You’ve decided to forego expensive color for cheaper black and white? You’d be surprised how little that lowers the cost. Printing, shipping, and various related charges--that’s where you’re spending more than half your income. More than half. Not on creative, not on marketing, not on advertising, not on all of that put together. On printing the damn thing.

    Graphic.ly's decision to cease comic distribution, is yet another reminder of why I'm uncomfortable using a third-party service to read my comics, which could stop being supported, at any time.

    And Mark Waid's examination of the cost of printing and distributing, makes me think of how all these major publishers, have hobbled themselves by attaching themselves to Comixology and Apple, both of which take a giant bite out of their profits.

  • Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus GRAND ATTACK!Registered User regular
    It's not just Comixology and Apple, though. They also have digital distribution deals with Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    My point is that they continue to include middlemen in their distribution.

    Marvel and DC emplyees have often pointed out that, by the time Comixology and Apple take their cut from a $2.99 comic, they're only making what they would off a print sale.

    Which is ludicrous.

    These are multi-million corporations, being backed by Time Warner and Disney. Is there any reason they can't just sell these things themselves, cut out the middlemen, make more money, and charge their customers less?

    I don't think so.

    I genuinely think that, if you make buying things easy enough for people, they'll support it. I recently bought Louis CK's Live at the Beacon Theater, as well as Aziz Ansari's Dangerously Delicious. They were each $5, free of DRM, etc.

    Louis CK made a million dollars in twelve days. Some people pirated it, but enough of his audience didn't, and enough of the money went to him directly, that he was able to make a sizable chunk of cash off it.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm sure Marvel and DC benefit from being affiliated with Amazon, Apple, etc. It probably nets them some sales they wouldn't otherwise receive.

    But, I think there's definitely smarter ways to sell their stuff.

  • TexiKenTexiKen Let's have fun out there. Registered User regular
    I'm not surprised graphicly closed, I signed up when they first started, tried to navigate their store, but it was confusing and nothing showed completely on screen. They already came into the game late but then fell flat on their face.



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  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    Yeah, I always found their navigation a bit lacking, when I used it.

    I dunno, I accept that I'm an outlier, when it comes to digital comics. But, in my perfect world, I could sign up for some kind of subscription with Marvel or DC, and come Wednesday morning, I'd have a link in my e-mail, directing me to a download for a bunch of .PDF files. And if I wanted to buy something else? I could go to an easily navigated site, free of Flash (no, not that one), find the book I wanted, and download it, using the same account I pay for my digital subscription through. Easy-peasy.

    Instead, I have to go to third-party sites, navigate through clunky interfaces, and pay as much for a digital file I don't even own, as I would for a print comic. That's lunacy.

    And seriously, how can Comixology's search function be so awful?

  • JyrenBJyrenB Registered User regular
    I really can't see the big companies doing .pdf files anytime soon. If there's anything that can be seen as handing a comic straight to the pirates, that's it. Even if print books are scanned and online the day of.

    I don't personally mind the other programs or any of that, though they definitely could be streamlined a bit more.

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    XBL: JyrenB ; Steam: Jyren ; Twitter
  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    I guess this is on my mind because yesterday, I wanted to buy that AvX: Infinite thing that Waid and Immonen did. So, I went to Comixology, and searched for it. That didn't turn anything up. So, I manually went through the new releases, until I found it. Then I had to create an account. I got as far as setting my user name and password, when the whole site stopped displaying for me, only showing the grey background. I refreshed my browser, closed and re-opened it, etc. to no avail. So I said to Hell with it.

    Today, I tried back again, using the user name and password I set up yesterday. Comixology had no record of it being created, and I didn't feel like screwing with it, so I just bought some .PDF comics instead, using a PayPal account I already had, and use for a variety of other things.

    I'm a comics fan. They've already got me hooked. And even I didn't feel like jumping through those hoops. I can't imagine how frustrated an uninitiated reader would be, going through the same process.

  • JyrenBJyrenB Registered User regular
    Technically, using the website isn't really how they aim these comics.

    I mean, on my phone, the process took no time at all. I made a Marvel account in seconds, and it was automatically linked to my iTunes account right then and there. Infinite was on the front page of the app, also the first option on "New Releases" tab, and bam, bought in a minute.

    Technical issues suck, yeah, but the system isn't that different than other mobile apps use these days for buying in app content.

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    XBL: JyrenB ; Steam: Jyren ; Twitter
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    What is so difficult about setting up a comic site like a porn site? You pay whatever to enter and browse everything. There could be a few subsites, say Ultimate, Spider-man, X-men, Avengers and then whatever else. You could pay... 15 dollars per month or something, or you could get a discount for subscribing to everything.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • TurambarTurambar Avocado at law Registered User regular
    Anal costs extra

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    Origin: Turamb | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar
  • CrimsondudeCrimsondude Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    EDIT: I said nothing!

    Crimsondude on
  • herojoeherojoe IndianapolisRegistered User regular
    What is so difficult about setting up a comic site like a porn site? You pay whatever to enter and browse everything. There could be a few subsites, say Ultimate, Spider-man, X-men, Avengers and then whatever else. You could pay... 15 dollars per month or something, or you could get a discount for subscribing to everything.

    That would make too much sense.

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  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    Well, Marvel's digital program is kind of like that. The problem is it sucks, and the content is only sporadically updated. I mean, they'll upload issues one, three, and four of a mini-series, and issue two will never materialize.

    I know Archie's Red Circle is supposed to be kind of a Netflix-style system. A bunch of old material, with new material introduced in the form of new pages every week. I'm curious to see what shape that takes.

  • HenslerHensler Registered User regular
    What is so difficult about setting up a comic site like a porn site? You pay whatever to enter and browse everything. There could be a few subsites, say Ultimate, Spider-man, X-men, Avengers and then whatever else. You could pay... 15 dollars per month or something, or you could get a discount for subscribing to everything.

    Marvel's digital comics were actually set-up like this for a short period when they first started showing up online. It was around the same time that Ultimate Spider-Man started, and didn't last long.

  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    edit: what a horrible thing to double-post

    Munch on
  • HenslerHensler Registered User regular
    Looks better than what Rich Johnston usually "creates."

  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    Remember when he came here and promised it wasn't going to be a bunch of racist stereotypes? Yeah.

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  • Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus GRAND ATTACK!Registered User regular
    Well that was dumb and pointless.

  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    I don't really mind Bleeding Cool.

    He's muck-raker, but he acknowledges it. And he tries to turn people onto indie books, even if it's through dubious ways, like catering to speculators.

    Iron Muslim just looks like a waste of time and energy for everyone involved. It's lazy in the same way as all those Scary Movie derivatives.

    But, Johnston seems like a guy whose #1 goal is selling himself and his work. And something like Iron Muslim will probably move more comics, than something that wasn't this particular brand of dumb parody.

  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    None of that saves it from being a pile of terrible, racist bullshit.

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  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Arivia wrote: »
    Remember when he came here and promised it wasn't going to be a bunch of racist stereotypes? Yeah.

    Pretty much

  • The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    see i am not seeing it as a bunch of racist stereotypes

    moreseo as just poorly written

    which is actually worse, because over the top racism might have been preferred to something that is literally just

    TONY STARK, BUT AS A TERRORIST

    he is not even muslim. he is just not on the America side. that is it. that is the whole thing.

    there is nothing deeper than that, and that takes lazy to a brand new stratosphere

  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    edited April 2012
    Yeah it is also poorly written

    as in, the words and sentences

    they are bad

    Solar on
  • Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus GRAND ATTACK!Registered User regular
    I don't understand why he basically has no origin story

    why not invert the Tony Stark origin so instead of an American being captured by terrorists, he's a brilliant Arab businessman thrown in Guantanamo

  • nightmarennynightmarenny Registered User regular
    Trapped in a warzone, Al Stark has an epiphany: “Americans are a superstitious and cowardly lot. I shall become a Muslim”.

    Oi. How do you even respond to something like that?

    That said I would be really interested in a movie/comic that was what Centi described. Unless it were really stupid of course.

    Quire.jpg
  • AntimatterAntimatter Registered User regular
    http://www.seibertron.com/transformers/news/diamond-selects-comics-and-idw-bringing-back-the-battle-beasts/24547/
    w

    what

    Battle Beasts was one of those toys from the 80s owned by Hasbro and Takara, with fiction in Japan that had the Battle Beasts interact with Transformers


    and now Diamond Select owns Battle Beasts toy and fiction rights, and IDW, the guys also publishing Transformers, are publishing a Battle Beasts miniseries unrelated to Transformers

  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    wwwwwuuuuuut

    I fucking loved those toys.

    But, I'm not sure I really want to read a comic about them.

  • AntimatterAntimatter Registered User regular
    here's the preview for the comic. art is okay? it's bloodier than I expected. writing is generic.
    http://battlebeasts.infernalmachinery.com/comic-book/

    oh boy

    turns out that there's a manga out called Beast Saga

    and that TakaraTomy is making toys for it that look more like the 80s Battle Beasts than the Diamond ones do

    that's fucking weird.

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