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[Gay Rights] Scott Walker still trying to get fired.

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Posts

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Blackjack wrote: »
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    Are there really It's Okay to be Takei shirts?

    If the money goes to charity, I would be so on that.
    There are and it does.

    I'll post a pic of mine once it gets in. Ordered it on Friday.

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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    What complete and utter evil pieces of shit.

    When I say that these people aren't worthy of the respect of human beings, this is exactly what I'm talking about: holding a vote to take away people's fucking rights. That's not something one human being does to another.

    If there were gay people holding Pride rallies in front of churches in speedos and leather every Sunday, saying "we're here until gay marriage is legal," I'll bet you gay marriage would be legal in no fucking time.

  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Well, they shouldn't. But it's a fairly depressing constant in history really

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  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    The look on that guy's face as he left the floor - the one with the walking stick. His eyes were horrible. Full of pride and contempt at the same time. That is a frightening expression.

  • DelzhandDelzhand motivated battle programmerRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    It's the face of a man who knows he's doing god's righteous work, and he permits himself no doubt.

    What's that CS Lewis quote? Ah, here it is.
    It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.

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  • JuliusJulius Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    BigBear wrote: »

    It's also come to my attention recently that Tyler's producer, Syd tha Kyd, is apparently a lesbian herself. I do not, by any means, think that lets Tyler off the hook with this stuff, but it does, along with all the praise they're getting from critics, listeners and the industry, make me wonder if there's something more to Tyler and Odd Future than the punk-ass skater kids I see on the surface.

    I think there is. For all his shock lyrics, he goes pretty far out of the way in Goblin to point out that a lot of what he says is hyperbolic or completely made up. I remember him coming out against Prop 8, so that's something.

    Now, whether or not his lyrics influence others negatively might be another conversation, but I feel like the album is a little more intelligent than Sara gives it credit for.

    Onto another celebrity remark:

    Charles Barkley on reported homophobia in sports:
    “First of all, every player has played with gay guys. It bothers me when I hear these reporters and jocks get on TV and say: ‘Oh, no guy can come out in a team sport. These guys would go crazy.’ First of all, quit telling me what I think. I’d rather have a gay guy who can play than a straight guy who can’t play.”

    “We gossiped behind each other’s back before; I’ll be the first to admit that,” he said, before adding, “The first people who whine and complain is them Bible-thumpers, who are supposed to be non-judgmental, who rail against them."

    He certainly seems to know what's what. It's a shame more athletes can't be this candid more often.

    Barkley is fucking awesome. Straight athlete who is willing to come out and say he's liberal as fuck in these issues.

    He should be totes governor.

  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    He also made the best game ever in the form of Shut up and Jam Gaiden

    which I insist he coded himself

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWKQiZVBtu4

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  • EvigilantEvigilant VARegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Right around 2:22 in the video, the guy expresses my sentiments exactly:

    "I don't know about you guys, but I cannot look at his family, I can't look at his picture and say, 'you know what Cpl? You where good enough to fight for your country and give your life, but you where not good enough to marry the person you love.' I can't do that, I cannot do that, and I won't do that."

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  • KoshianKoshian __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2011
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o2YGH8bacE&feature=player_embedded

    Fuck. Fuck.

    If you stop businesses from discriminating against transpeople, it opens bathrooms for child molesters.

  • Orochi_RockmanOrochi_Rockman __BANNED USERS
    edited May 2011
    So, if a male rapist were to try to follow a little girl into a womens bathroom right now, a magical forcefield would manifest at the door keeping him out right?

    I think we've reached a new level of insane when it comes to our bigot propaganda.

  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Right now I'm on a political bent, as the run-up to presidential elections typically finds me, and today I find myself wondering one unifying question:

    "Is a candidate's stance on civil rights, specifically GLBT and abortion rights, the most important qualifier in determining their viability for office?"


    Note that I'm not asking whether or not GLBT rights or abortion rights are the most pressing or important issues of the coming election, because I don't really think they are. However, I do feel that a candidate's position on those issues says quite a lot about his or her suitability to lead this nation and direct its national mandate.

    I've said this in this thread before, but I think the Right-wing arguments against gay rights and abortion rights skirt very, very closely to being unconstitutional on the grounds that they violate the Jeffersonian interpretations of inherent clauses of the First Amendment's separation of church and state. Meaning, if your primary rhetorical argument is based in appeal to religious moral imperative, that should be considered utterly invalid. I know well that the US hasn't ever been consistent in its application of those provisions and statutes, but citing those inconsistencies to support an argument to persist and expand in that erring tradition is patently and knowingly ignorant, and I wish there was a stronger word to use than that.

    To the point specifically, if a candidate for political office has either the inclination to promote populism over constitutional protections and egalitarianism, or worse, honestly feels that sectarian religious positions are a legitimate rhetorical foundation for arguments supporting the appropriation or (more likely) restriction of rights and entitlements to anyone, regardless of any sexual, racial, or philosophical qualifier, then I feel that the only reasonable assumption that can be made is that said candidate is utterly and irrecoverably unfit to serve the public in any capacity.

  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Koshian wrote: »
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o2YGH8bacE&feature=player_embedded

    Fuck. Fuck.

    If you stop businesses from discriminating against transpeople, it opens bathrooms for child molesters.

    My mouth is hanging open. I don't know what to say.

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Koshian wrote: »
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o2YGH8bacE&feature=player_embedded

    Fuck. Fuck.

    If you stop businesses from discriminating against transpeople, it opens bathrooms for child molesters.

    My mouth is hanging open. I don't know what to say.
    You say "thank you, the South, for making me feel so much better about where I live."

  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Thanatos wrote: »
    You say "thank you, the South, for making me feel so much better about where I live."

    You can usually scale how strong the evangelical's rhetoric is by how ridiculous their counterarguments are. Here, we have a politician equating provisions for transgendered people with allowing grown men to prey on small girls in public restrooms.

    I suppose that's somewhat better than the "gay marriage will lead to legalizing bestiality" chestnut, but not by much.

  • mythagomythago Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    To the point specifically, if a candidate for political office has either the inclination to promote populism over constitutional protections and egalitarianism, or worse, honestly feels that sectarian religious positions are a legitimate rhetorical foundation for arguments supporting the appropriation or (more likely) restriction of rights and entitlements to anyone, regardless of any sexual, racial, or philosophical qualifier, then I feel that the only reasonable assumption that can be made is that said candidate is utterly and irrecoverably unfit to serve the public in any capacity.

    That's a wordy way of saying "religious bigots have no place in public service."

    I know you have a religion thing going on, but I don't reaaaaly think you want that to be the dividing line. If it's a a toss-up between a libertarian atheist who says "homosexuality is unnatural and biologically dangerous behavior, I have these Powerpoint slides that say so" and a devout liberal Christian who says "God doesn't play pranks on His children, gay or straight, we are all one in Christ Jesus and the state has no business enshrining discrimination," I know which one I'd pick.

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  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I've always wondered just how delusional Focus on the Family was....

    Focus on the Family CEO: 'We've Probably Lost' on Same-Sex Marriage
    We're losing on that one, especially among the 20- and 30-somethings: 65 to 70 percent of them favor same-sex marriage. I don't know if that's going to change with a little more age—demographers would say probably not. We've probably lost that.

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  • AtomikaAtomika Social Justice Mage + 12 charm/-5 lockpickingRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    mythago wrote: »
    To the point specifically, if a candidate for political office has either the inclination to promote populism over constitutional protections and egalitarianism, or worse, honestly feels that sectarian religious positions are a legitimate rhetorical foundation for arguments supporting the appropriation or (more likely) restriction of rights and entitlements to anyone, regardless of any sexual, racial, or philosophical qualifier, then I feel that the only reasonable assumption that can be made is that said candidate is utterly and irrecoverably unfit to serve the public in any capacity.

    That's a wordy way of saying "religious bigots have no place in public service."

    I know you have a religion thing going on, but I don't reaaaaly think you want that to be the dividing line. If it's a a toss-up between a libertarian atheist who says "homosexuality is unnatural and biologically dangerous behavior, I have these Powerpoint slides that say so" and a devout liberal Christian who says "God doesn't play pranks on His children, gay or straight, we are all one in Christ Jesus and the state has no business enshrining discrimination," I know which one I'd pick.

    You'd pick the one that specifically suits your interests at that one given time? Or you would pick the official who was open to choosing the best position based on logic and informed rhetoric?

  • TaramoorTaramoor Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    mythago wrote: »
    To the point specifically, if a candidate for political office has either the inclination to promote populism over constitutional protections and egalitarianism, or worse, honestly feels that sectarian religious positions are a legitimate rhetorical foundation for arguments supporting the appropriation or (more likely) restriction of rights and entitlements to anyone, regardless of any sexual, racial, or philosophical qualifier, then I feel that the only reasonable assumption that can be made is that said candidate is utterly and irrecoverably unfit to serve the public in any capacity.

    That's a wordy way of saying "religious bigots have no place in public service."

    I know you have a religion thing going on, but I don't reaaaaly think you want that to be the dividing line. If it's a a toss-up between a libertarian atheist who says "homosexuality is unnatural and biologically dangerous behavior, I have these Powerpoint slides that say so" and a devout liberal Christian who says "God doesn't play pranks on His children, gay or straight, we are all one in Christ Jesus and the state has no business enshrining discrimination," I know which one I'd pick.

    Remove the word 'religious' and I think very few people would have a problem with the sentence. Hell, most people probably wouldn't mind it as is.

  • TheBlackWindTheBlackWind Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I've always wondered just how delusional Focus on the Family was....

    Focus on the Family CEO: 'We've Probably Lost' on Same-Sex Marriage
    We're losing on that one, especially among the 20- and 30-somethings: 65 to 70 percent of them favor same-sex marriage. I don't know if that's going to change with a little more age—demographers would say probably not. We've probably lost that.

    Ahaha go younger generation!

    Pokemon Black FC: 0518-7386-3511
    Pokemon Black 2: 0519-5108-3139
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Taramoor wrote: »
    mythago wrote: »
    To the point specifically, if a candidate for political office has either the inclination to promote populism over constitutional protections and egalitarianism, or worse, honestly feels that sectarian religious positions are a legitimate rhetorical foundation for arguments supporting the appropriation or (more likely) restriction of rights and entitlements to anyone, regardless of any sexual, racial, or philosophical qualifier, then I feel that the only reasonable assumption that can be made is that said candidate is utterly and irrecoverably unfit to serve the public in any capacity.

    That's a wordy way of saying "religious bigots have no place in public service."

    I know you have a religion thing going on, but I don't reaaaaly think you want that to be the dividing line. If it's a a toss-up between a libertarian atheist who says "homosexuality is unnatural and biologically dangerous behavior, I have these Powerpoint slides that say so" and a devout liberal Christian who says "God doesn't play pranks on His children, gay or straight, we are all one in Christ Jesus and the state has no business enshrining discrimination," I know which one I'd pick.

    Remove the word 'religious' and I think very few people would have a problem with the sentence. Hell, most people probably wouldn't mind it as is.

    It is something we have talked about before, and I believe our current generation is increasingly willing to criticize religious beliefs when they conflict negatively with society. Previously, when people criticized or discriminated against religion, it was usually based out of baseless religious strife (i.e., people who hated Catholics because they were Protestant) and no valid reason otherwise. So we enacted laws, rightly so, to protect people from being discriminated against based on their religion.

    But now we see religion being used as a shield from criticism, because once you apply the adjective "religious" to the word "bigot" suddenly it's okay to be a non-knowing ass because you "believe it to be true." As a result, we are seeing the lines increasingly drawn on the left between those who wish to keep religions free from any criticism, and those who want to say "no, that belief and attitude is fucking stupid, you're a bad person for believing so, and saying it's your religion is no excuse for being a terrible human being."

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  • Bobkins FlymoBobkins Flymo HAPPY WAALUWEEN Registered User, Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited May 2011
    So how much money is the Mormon Church going to spend interfering with another state's vote?

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  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    So how much money is the Mormon Church going to spend interfering with another state's vote?

    Is it wrong to hope a LOT?

    I want to see their bottom-line suffer, and for them to lose more members like they did after Prop 8.

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  • 21stCentury21stCentury *~ Have a Magical day ~* Purveyor of Pixelly PalsRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    So how much money is the Mormon Church going to spend interfering with another state's vote?

    Is it wrong to hope a LOT?

    I want to see their bottom-line suffer, and for them to lose more members like they did after Prop 8.

    I don't know much about it, but I'd say it's wrong. Aren't churches usually spending most of their money on charitable stuff? Like food and clothes for the needy and such?

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  • Bobkins FlymoBobkins Flymo HAPPY WAALUWEEN Registered User, Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited May 2011
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    So how much money is the Mormon Church going to spend interfering with another state's vote?

    Is it wrong to hope a LOT?

    I want to see their bottom-line suffer, and for them to lose more members like they did after Prop 8.
    I don't know much about it, but I'd say it's wrong. Aren't churches usually spending most of their money on charitable stuff? Like food and clothes for the needy and such?
    They spent thousands towards to the Pop 8 vote in CA. We can have a charity that doesn't support bigotry on the side.

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  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    So how much money is the Mormon Church going to spend interfering with another state's vote?

    Is it wrong to hope a LOT?

    I want to see their bottom-line suffer, and for them to lose more members like they did after Prop 8.
    I don't know much about it, but I'd say it's wrong. Aren't churches usually spending most of their money on charitable stuff? Like food and clothes for the needy and such?
    They spent thousands towards to the Pop 8 vote in CA. We can have a charity that doesn't support bigotry on the side.

    They essentially utilized the church's organization to funnel both cash and support in the form of bodies to advocate for a particular political outcome. Which is a big, big no no. In a just world in which we followed the law we would have revoked the entire church's tax exempt status in a heartbeat.

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  • lizard eats flieslizard eats flies Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Thanatos wrote: »
    Koshian wrote: »
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o2YGH8bacE&feature=player_embedded

    Fuck. Fuck.

    If you stop businesses from discriminating against transpeople, it opens bathrooms for child molesters.

    My mouth is hanging open. I don't know what to say.
    You say "thank you, the South, for making me feel so much better about where I live."

    Its not just the south. This kind of transphobia and trans discrimination happens EVERYWHERE. Even in places where we have protections in place for gender identity and expression.

    I have seen trans people get harassed/kicked out of bathrooms in LGBT centers in California. Its fucking depressing. If an LGBT center isnt even a safe space to pee... I really don't know where is.

  • TurkeyTurkey Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I can understand feeling a bit awkward when you're not used to trans people in the bathroom, but to take it as far as getting involved in their business? God what is wrong with people

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  • MelksterMelkster Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWA_jr-AwyA

    This is from the creator of South Park's new musical: The Book of Mormon. Just watch it. Watch it. It's hilarious.

    Elder McKinley is one of the other missionaries who is sent to Africa along with Price and Cunningham. He laments his homosexual feelings, but reminds himself to "Turn It Off" like a light switch. The others agree that their feelings must be hidden, at all costs.

  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Melkster wrote: »
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWA_jr-AwyA

    This is from the creator of South Park's new musical: The Book of Mormon. Just watch it. Watch it. It's hilarious.

    Elder McKinley is one of the other missionaries who is sent to Africa along with Price and Cunningham. He laments his homosexual feelings, but reminds himself to "Turn It Off" like a light switch. The others agree that their feelings must be hidden, at all costs.


    Hey, that's the guy who did Princeton orginally in Avenue Q, John Tartaglia. Also, that's not even vaguely amusing. South Park dude hast lost his mojo.

  • MelksterMelkster Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I disagree! I've listened to it about a dozen times now.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    shryke wrote: »
    What's not funny about it?

    What is? The jokes just don't work; they're barely there. It's lame.

  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I fear you are in a critical minority on this one - the book of mormon was pretty well received afaik

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  • Magus`Magus` Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    14 Tony noms, last I looked.

  • InvisibleInvisible Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    And we all know if something is popular it must be good and embraced by all, right? ;-)

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  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I have seen trans people get harassed/kicked out of bathrooms in LGBT centers in California. Its fucking depressing. If an LGBT center isnt even a safe space to pee... I really don't know where is.

    What? How does that even work?

    "We don't take kindly to our your type round here"

  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Aw....

    Actor Bill Hunter dies

    You may know him as Bob from Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Which I JUST watched last night.

    Sad.

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  • lizard eats flieslizard eats flies Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    V1m wrote: »
    I have seen trans people get harassed/kicked out of bathrooms in LGBT centers in California. Its fucking depressing. If an LGBT center isnt even a safe space to pee... I really don't know where is.

    What? How does that even work?

    "We don't take kindly to our your type round here"

    Its kind of mind boggling, but there are plenty instances where LGB folk still think of the T peeps as freaks and infiltrators and impostors and the like. Granted, all in all, larger cities in CA are still some of the better places to be trans, but its not like the problems are JUST located in the south/rural areas. Heck often times the more conservative areas can be easier for trans people in that you can generally blend in with the populace easier. People are not as aware of it or can't imagine a trans person MIGHT be among them. So you can slip on thru easier.

  • TNTrooperTNTrooper Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Invisible wrote: »
    And we all know if something is popular it must be good and embraced by all, right? ;-)

    Well that was the Mormon's strategy. Keep bouncing from place to place till you find a state that doesn't chase you out.

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This discussion has been closed.