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Ripping DvDs

ArrathArrath Registered User
First, if this veers towards illegal territory, mods please delete this.

Okay, I've got a NAS box over in the corner (up and running thanks to these forums) from which I can stream my music to any device in the house. I would like to do the same with my movie collection. So my question to you is, what program should I use to rip them? Preferably in a format that Xbox 360's can play.

I've been fumbling around with VLC player for a while now, and I just finally got it to spit out a video file that would play on my computer. Problem is, the audio was a good 10 seconds out of sync. So I'm turning to you guys.

Arrath on
cj iwakura wrote:
Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.

Posts

  • Commander_KeenCommander_Keen Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Well depending on what program you are using to stream the media to your devices you can probably get away with using imgeburn then creating a image from the dvd. I personally use PS3 java media server and it has a way of mounting image files and allowing them to play over my devices (xbox 360, ps3, and a sony wifi blu-ray player). http://forum.imgburn.com/index.php?showtopic=6379 ---Follow that guide and you can't go wrong. If you dont have the java ps3 media server then i suggest getting it and giving it a try. If you are trying to play images on your pc just use and image mounter (ie daemon tools, magic disc, power iso) i suggest using magic disc. Uses less resources and doesnt come bundled with a bunch of crap. Then mount the image and load it with either vlc or media player. Let me know if you have any issues.

  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    For video conversion to mp4 (which the xbox supports) use Handbrake with vlc (free) or anydvd (not free) installed for decryption. This is the correct answer 100% of the time.

  • ArrathArrath Registered User
    edited April 2011
    If you are trying to play images on your pc just use and image mounter (ie daemon tools, magic disc, power iso) i suggest using magic disc. Uses less resources and doesnt come bundled with a bunch of crap. Then mount the image and load it with either vlc or media player. Let me know if you have any issues.

    I'd tried making an image of the disc with MagicDisc, both in UIF and ISO, both would play the splash screens and company logos, then seemingly reach the end of the video without reaching the dvd menu.

    I'm trying handbrake now.

    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    You're already trying it, but I'll second Handbrake.

    Especially if you're in Linux.

    Or on a Mac.

    Really, on Windows too.

    Spoiler:
  • ArrathArrath Registered User
    edited April 2011
    This is the most massive pain in the dick.

    Initially I tried to rip an entire dvd with Handbrake, which it did. The sound worked, but the video was distorted, still encrypted I guess. I made sure Handbrake was pointing towards the correct location for VLC, at which point it just started crashing whenever I tried to start the process or preview. So I did the uninstall/restart/install/restart dance.

    With Archer S1D1, it only 'saw' 5 of the 23 or so titles. And, again, didn't spit out usable files.

    I just used VLC to stream title 4 from the Archer disc, which was episode one. The resulting file would play in VLC but not anything else, WMP, Zune, Xbox, etc. It was fine in VLC though, sound wasn't off, framerate wasn't choppy. So I ran that file through Handbrake, and it now works in everything.

    I still want to go bash my head into a wall.

    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Doing this in Windows is kind of a pain in the ass, unless you're willing to spring for purchased software (the free options, like DVDDecrypter, are woefully out of date).

    CSS encryption is way easier to deal with in Linux. I'll be dead honest and say that Handbrake alone is the reason I still keep a few gig of my hard drive dedicated to a Linux partition...I'll just boot into it, rip the DVD, boot back out. If I'm doing episodes, I'll just queue them up to go overnight.

    EDIT: I know it's a pain in the ass, but it's a known pain in the ass. Hell, you can just buy a 4GB thumb drive down at Best Buy for $12, and install Ubuntu to it and boot off that (just mount your NTFS partition as a place to save the completed rips).

    Spoiler:
  • ArrathArrath Registered User
    edited April 2011
    I aim to digitize my entire collection, so I'm not against shelling out for a real program. Which I may well do if it is easier, less of a hassle, etc.

    On another note, Handbrake is the first program I've seen that maxed out my i7.

    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    DVD FAB is legal & has a free option. DVD43 is also free though not as updated as often as DVD FAB.

    Rip the discs that you own and then use Handbrake to convert them over. I use .mp4 (.m4v) so that the files will play on my PS3 & other boxes since the .mkv container has very limited support.

  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    DVD FAB is legal & has a free option. DVD43 is also free though not as updated as often as DVD FAB.

    Rip the discs that you own and then use Handbrake to convert them over. I use .mp4 (.m4v) so that the files will play on my PS3 & other boxes since the .mkv container has very limited support.

    Ah, forgot that there was the free bit of ****** that would just strip the CSS.

    Yeah, that works.

    And in Handbrake, if you just choose the "Regular" profile, that'll produce a .m4v that should play just fine on your Xbox.

    Spoiler:
  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    I use the high profile because I usually rip blu-ray.

  • ArrathArrath Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Yeah, going over the video that VLC spits out with HandBrake results in an .m4v that actually plays on things other than VLC. I just wish I didn't have to double pass it. HandBrake does it screamingly fast, but VLC is fairly slow.

    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    What version of handbrake are you using? Current Stable, Nightly, other?

    It's strange that handbrake is giving you that issue.
    You are the second person who has just started down this path having weird issues I have heard about this week.

    Honestly I have been ripping videos for various formats since 2003 and Handbrake has been the best solution. For decrypting on windows if you aren't overly opposed to shelling out cash I would get anydvd and anydvd hd (if you have a bluray drive) as your decrypter. If you are re-compressing a VLC stream quality is probably impacted by the double-compress.

  • ArrathArrath Registered User
    edited April 2011
    I went to the HandBrake site and clicked on 'download', so I'm assuming I'm on the current stable build.

    I'll tinker with this some more and consider moving to anydvd.

    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • rockmonkeyrockmonkey Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    If I was planning on doing quite a few movies would it be worth it to setup a linux boot or is DVD Fab + Handbrake enough? A couple years ago I did maybe 6 DVDs over into the right format/size to play on my ipod touch and I ripped them with something, can't remember, and then used Handbrake and it seemed an ok route.

    Basically what's the advantage to doing it in linux instead of win7.

    NEWrockzomb80.jpg
  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    DVD Fab + Handbrake is enough and the most efficient if you're going to convert into another format. You don't need to waste your time with Linux.

  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    DVD Fab + Handbrake is enough and the most efficient if you're going to convert into another format. You don't need to waste your time with Linux.

    Out of curiosity, why not just Handbrake with VLC installed? cost is free. DvD Fab cost money correct?

  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    useless4 wrote: »
    DVD Fab + Handbrake is enough and the most efficient if you're going to convert into another format. You don't need to waste your time with Linux.

    Out of curiosity, why not just Handbrake with VLC installed? cost is free. DvD Fab cost money correct?

    No, I believe there's a portion of DF that's just the decryption bit, and it's free.

    And from what I understand, doing it with VLC installed isn't quite as seamless (unlike on OSX where it really is).

    If you're going to be using it often, a Linux partition (or, better, a bootable Linux USB device with some persistence, via Lili) might be worthwhile, because the Linux version of Handbrake is (in my opinion) quite a bit better. The Windows version really is the bastard child of the group.

    EDIT: Though you'll wind up with the same end results...there's no difference in output, just in interface.

    Spoiler:
  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    useless4 wrote: »
    DVD Fab + Handbrake is enough and the most efficient if you're going to convert into another format. You don't need to waste your time with Linux.

    Out of curiosity, why not just Handbrake with VLC installed? cost is free. DvD Fab cost money correct?

    The free portion of DVD FAB Decrypts the disc and rips it to the hard drive. Then you can just fire up Hand brake.

    VLC has very limited hardware acceleration, it just eats up CPU cycles. When you're converting video you don't want that. Combign that with trying to convert the files with the disc as the source. Unless you have a beefy system just rip it the harddrive to save yourself the time.

  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Unless it's substantially different workflow then on the Mac, don't you just install VLC for the decryption keys and never, ever launch it and let handbrake just go to work?

    That's how it is on the Mac.

    I will admit on windows I have never tried it that way because I use AnyDVD (HD) when I had to.
    I have since quit doing any encoding on Windows once they released MakeMKV to let me rip blurays under osx.

    Question: What kind of encoding speeds in fps are you guys getting by doing the rip to hard drive then handbrake out of curiosity? Curious to see if Handbrake caught up with the OSX version - it used to be dog slow but I know it got much better much quicker with the .9x releases.

  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    useless4 wrote: »
    Unless it's substantially different workflow then on the Mac, don't you just install VLC for the decryption keys and never, ever launch it and let handbrake just go to work?

    That's how it is on the Mac.

    I will admit on windows I have never tried it that way because I use AnyDVD (HD) when I had to.
    I have since quit doing any encoding on Windows once they released MakeMKV to let me rip blurays under osx.

    This is not, in fact, how it works on Windows. Which is why I generally recommend doing it in Linux. To read the disc directly you need something like AnyDVD; to my knowledge VLC won't work, and I don't know of any other free option that allows "seamless" rips like that.
    Question: What kind of encoding speeds in fps are you guys getting by doing the rip to hard drive then handbrake out of curiosity? Curious to see if Handbrake caught up with the OSX version - it used to be dog slow but I know it got much better much quicker with the .9x releases.

    No idea....fast. Way, way over 100fps on an i5. I don't know about the Mac version (only Mac I ran it on was a G4) but there's little difference between the Linux and Windows versions, speed-wise.

    Spoiler:
  • wunderbarwunderbar Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    I personally shelled out the money for AnyDVD HD a while ago, and could not be happier. Small tray icon, put the disc in, and it just does all the magic automatically. It was expensive, but I've digitized several hundred discs, thanks mostly to TV series, and it works great, and imo was worth the money. I usually just end up copy/pasting the entire contents of the DVD to my drive, then transcoding them from there. I'll do that for a TV series: get 300GB worth of DVD's onto a drive, and then queue it all up in handbrake and let it run overnight.

    Also, as for speed, doing it in handbrake this way lets me encode a 42 minute TV show in about 8 minutes with an i7 920 that is slightly overclocked. The most recent versions of Handbrake have finally gone full multi threaded and it's one of the few "real world" applications I've ever seen that is able to pin all 8 threads to 100%.

  • Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Yeah I paid for the lifetime license for AnyDVD HD and it was worth it. Because I've ripped a few blu-ray to .mp4.

    This thread is starting to irritate me with the people chiming in without reading first. Especially the ones who don't use windows so don't know about the software differences & limitations.

  • GooeyGooey Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    If all you care about is the movie file (not looking to mount ISOs) MakeMKV is a good product (and free for DVDs)

    I use it for all my Blu-Rays and DVDs.

    919UOwT.png
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Yeah I paid for the lifetime license for AnyDVD HD and it was worth it. Because I've ripped a few blu-ray to .mp4.

    This thread is starting to irritate me with the people chiming in without reading first. Especially the ones who don't use windows so don't know about the software differences & limitations.

    I apologize I don't use windows anymore, I was just trying to be nice and offer up what I thought would be a possibility. If you really want to know how to do it - which I have tested 1920 times as of today - you want the following setups. I just never offer it up first because the internet for some reason doesn't like the solutions offered below because they cost money.

    Windows.
    1. AnyDVD , AnyDVD HD (I never suggest this combo because people immediately bitch about the price and offer up some half ass decryptor/encoder package that is pure shit)
    2. Handbrake for DVDs
    3. RipBot x264 for BluRays

    Mac.
    1. Handbrake 64bit , VLC 64bit for DVDs
    2. MakeMKV for BluRay decryption to .mkv files, use Handbrake for encoding - Once again people bitch about the price but it's the only bluray decryptor available for Mac.
    3. Vidalin for tagging

    There. Done. For encoding for apple products, these are the solutions.

    If you want to rip-then encode DVDs on windows, I suggest the following workflow:
    1. Buy and Install everything above.
    2. Find DVDShrink. It's getting harder, it's older and in the graveyard of software.
    3. Set the maximum medium size to some stupid number like 500gb... just bigger then 10gb.
    4. Rip the movie to a folder, repeat.
    5. Batch in handbrake (IF windows handbrake supports queing which it did)

    You can batch rip bluray using AnyDVD HD tools that come with the install, but I have never found a machine that can (rip then encode) quicker then (encode straight from the disc). The only real benefit is once again the queing, but you will lose out in overall speed of the process.

    On Mac you almost should que blurays since you have to rip first anyway.
    Handbrake can do approximately 60 movies in a row without getting flaky from a single que on windows last time I checked.

  • amnesiasoftamnesiasoft Thick Creamy Furry Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Yeah I paid for the lifetime license for AnyDVD HD and it was worth it.
    I concur. It is absolutely worth every penny.

    steam_sig.png
  • wunderbarwunderbar Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Also, handbrake handles blu-ray movies now. I actually haven't tried it yet, but you should be able to transcode the blu-ray files in handbrake. I actually do plan on doing a few this weekend to test. I will report back.

  • RandomEngyRandomEngy Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Yeah I am obligated to point out VidCoder: which is a windows GUI for the Handbrake core. That gives you instant previews, has a nicer preset system, lets you pause and batch encode. It's implemented by calling directly into the core libraries rather than wrapping the command line. And it rips blu-rays too, since that was added to HandBrake.

    Though it doesn't have blu-ray subtitles yet. I use VidCoder for blu-rays without subtitles and RipBot 264 for those with subtitles. It takes way longer for ripbot to scan them since that program is just gluing a bunch of other programs together and needs to extract all the video and audio streams before it can do anything, while VidCoder/HandBrake just has everything in one DLL.

    Handbrake recently got audio gain adjustments (changing audio volume) checked in and I've got that added. I'm going to make a few more improvements and try to get a new version out in a week or so.

    Profile -> Signature Settings -> Hide signatures always. Then you don't have to read this worthless text anymore.
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    RandomEngy wrote: »
    Yeah I am obligated to point out VidCoder: which is a windows GUI for the Handbrake core. That gives you instant previews, has a nicer preset system, lets you pause and batch encode. It's implemented by calling directly into the core libraries rather than wrapping the command line. And it rips blu-rays too, since that was added to HandBrake.

    Though it doesn't have blu-ray subtitles yet. I use VidCoder for blu-rays without subtitles and RipBot 264 for those with subtitles. It takes way longer for ripbot to scan them since that program is just gluing a bunch of other programs together and needs to extract all the video and audio streams before it can do anything, while VidCoder/HandBrake just has everything in one DLL.

    Handbrake recently got audio gain adjustments (changing audio volume) checked in and I've got that added. I'm going to make a few more improvements and try to get a new version out in a week or so.

    This looks awesome. I'll be checking this out when I get back home.

    Spoiler:
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