Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Potty Training a Puppy?

TheRoadVirusTheRoadVirus I will show you why hurricanes are named after peopleRegistered User regular
edited May 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
Good morning one and all.

I adopted a puppy from the local animal shelter out here about a week and a half ago.
She's been good and is willing to learn, and as such, we've been able to teach her to sit and lay etc.
One problem, though, is that she is always peeing on the floor. Sometimes she'll drop a deuce as well, but more often than not, it's pee. This isn't as bad as it could be, as we have wood and tile floors as opposed to carpet so the cleanup isn't as hard.

There is really no pattern to her "accidents", and a lot of times she will pee inside shortly after doing the same thing in the backyard. We keep her kenneled (is that even a word?) at night, and after a few minutes of whining, she goes to sleep. She hasn't had a single incident in the kennel, which is great, but I'm honestly at a loss as to what to do to get her to stop.

Have any of you had any similar problems with your dogs? Any tips you'd be willing to share?
If it matters any, she's a Rottweiler/Australian Cattle Dog mix, according to the vet. She's about 4 months old also.

TheRoadVirus on
TDPforum.png
New ep. every Monday. On iTunes and Android podcast apps!. Subscribe by Email
PM with questions/critiques, or if we are not showing up in your app of choice.

PSN: The_Road_Virus Twitch: The_Road_Virus Steam: TheRoadVirus AMAZON WISHLIST

Posts

  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    How often do you walk her? Puppies need to be walked more often than adults do, since their bladders are smaller. You might be able to get away with walking an adult dog twice a day, but a puppy should be taken outside to go every few hours.

    I think what you should be doing is trying to teach her how to let you know when she wants to go to the bathroom. Try paying attention to her and see if there's something in her behavior that is consistent before she pees on the floor. Heavy sniffing, maybe tail down if she knows she isn't supposed to be going inside. A good rule to follow is, if it looks like she might need to pee, take her for a walk. Worst case, you're outside for another five minutes out of the day.

    You can also try placing a potty pad by the door and spraying pheromones that encourage dogs to go on it (or some other way to encourage), that way (theoretically, it doesnt work for all dogs) when she is looking to go she will head for the door, and you will know to walk her. Eventually she will make the connection that outside is for using the bathroom.

  • TheRoadVirusTheRoadVirus I will show you why hurricanes are named after peopleRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I wake up early in the morning to take her to the bathroom before work.
    I come home for lunch around 3 1/2-4 hours later (I live a few minutes from work) and take her out for another 5-10 minutes and we come and play inside after I eat some lunch.
    Then I come home about 4-5 hours after that, and take her out immediately, and every couple hours after that.
    Should I maybe take her water bowl after a certain time?

    I try to look out for warning signs, but between her and a 4 year old, it's hard to keep up with both haha.
    I read online that the sniffing is an indicator, but she seems like she's always sniffing around indoors.
    Do you know where I can get that pheremone stuff? My work internet blocks virtually any pet-related site, so I'm having 0 luck searching for it.

    TDPforum.png
    New ep. every Monday. On iTunes and Android podcast apps!. Subscribe by Email
    PM with questions/critiques, or if we are not showing up in your app of choice.

    PSN: The_Road_Virus Twitch: The_Road_Virus Steam: TheRoadVirus AMAZON WISHLIST
  • Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User
    edited May 2011
    4-5 hours is just too long for a puppy to be expected to hold it, especially when she hasn't been conditioned to do so. The basic rule of puppy elimination frequency is every hour (or less) for every month of age, so you're already straining her limits, and the problem is compounded by the fact that she hasn't been potty trained in the first place. Depriving her of water during the day is not an appropriate or humane thing to do, either. It will only be a month or so before she'll be able to just hold it while you're at work, but just letting her crap all over the place will a) make your place smell like dogshit, and b) make it much more difficult to actually get her housetrained. So, you basically have three options here:
    1. Find a friend, neighbour, family member, or petsitter to come by every couple of hours while you're gone to let the puppy out. It would be pretty expensive to hire someone to do it, and it would be a pretty significant hassle for a friend, unless you happen to know someone who loves puppies and doesn't have anything better to do during the day than sit at your house.
    2. Set up a designated indoor elimination area. The best is a sod box: get a shallow, wide plastic container (like the lid of a really big storage box, or a kid's turtle pool), line it with sod, and keep it near whatever door you use to take her outside. The grass will soak up urine just fine, and poop can be picked up and disposed of. A sod box is better than just laying down a bunch of newspapers, because when you think about it, conditioning your dog to excrete on any papers she sees lying on the floor is not really a great idea in the long run. Teaching her to poop on grass, though - even indoor grass - will reinforce the behaviour you want to encourage, though it may take a little longer to get her properly housetrained. (Why bother asking to be let out, especially if it's raining or unpleasant outside, when you can just pee on the indoor grass?)
    3. Crate her (keep her in her kennel) while you're gone. Dogs have very strong aversions to shitting where they sleep, and she does fine with it at night, so the only issue is your personal attitude towards crating. Some pet owners swear by it; some dislike the idea of keeping their dog cooped up all day. You'll have to decide for yourself.

    There's some solid information on puppy housetraining here that you should read through, as well.

    I'm here to tell you about voting. Imagine you're locked in a huge underground nightclub filled with sinners, whores, freaks and unnameable things that rape pit bulls for fun. And you ain't allowed out until you all vote on what you're going to do tonight [. . .] So you vote for television, and everyone else, as far as your eye can see, votes to fuck you with switchblades. That's voting. You're welcome.
  • TheRoadVirusTheRoadVirus I will show you why hurricanes are named after peopleRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    things

    Awesome, thanks for the info. I'm reading the page right now while i wait for the servers for our stupid ticketing program to come back up.
    For clarification, I DO kennel her while I'm at work, and she has yet to have an accident while I've been gone. I'm mostly just confused by the fact that she pees on the floor almost immediately after coming inside from peeing in the grass.

    May look into the sod box until she is more used to letting us know she has to go, and we are more used to reading her signals.

    Like I said before, we've only had her for a week and a few days, so we're still trying to figure out the ins and outs of her behaviors.

    TDPforum.png
    New ep. every Monday. On iTunes and Android podcast apps!. Subscribe by Email
    PM with questions/critiques, or if we are not showing up in your app of choice.

    PSN: The_Road_Virus Twitch: The_Road_Virus Steam: TheRoadVirus AMAZON WISHLIST
  • Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Ah, if her accidents are while you're at home, then yeah, that's a whole other set of things you need to look for. I think the most useful thing to focus on is rewarding her when she pees outside, then keeping her leashed and constantly close to you when she's inside. If her understanding of the rules of potty are still fuzzy, she probably doesn't think there's anything wrong with wandering off and peeing on the bedroom floor even if she just came in. And if she is starting to know that it's wrong to pee inside, she probably hasn't figured out how to ask to go out yet, so she goes off and does her thing in private because she knows it's bad.

    Just keep a close eye on her, and if she exhibits any warning signs (scratching, sniffing, circling a spot a few times), take her out immediately. When she does pee outside, reward her with lavish praise and a small treat of some sort. If she pees on the floor and you didn't notice, there's nothing you can do other than clean it up, but if you do manage to catch her in the act, tell her "NO" sternly, pick her up, and put her down outside.

    I'm here to tell you about voting. Imagine you're locked in a huge underground nightclub filled with sinners, whores, freaks and unnameable things that rape pit bulls for fun. And you ain't allowed out until you all vote on what you're going to do tonight [. . .] So you vote for television, and everyone else, as far as your eye can see, votes to fuck you with switchblades. That's voting. You're welcome.
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Are you crate training? I found that helps as they don't want to pee in what they consider a "den". Just went through it dude stay strong! It takes a while but mine is 8 months and is perfect.... Except when she got a doggy stomach flu last week.

    steam_sig.png
    gamertag: Canadianllama
  • ceresceres Just your problem OoSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited May 2011
    All baby animal threads require pictures of some sort of the baby animal where possible. I don't know why this rule is not written down, but it should be.

    I've got my own life and I've got my own plans
    I hope you understand, and like the way that I am
  • LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Part of the deal here is that to you "don't pee indoors" seems like a really obvious rule, she is just a puppy and is still trying to figure out the rules. And also that puppies have small bladders.

    Praise her like crazy when she goes outside--and make sure you are THERE to praise her, don't just put her outdoors and go watch TV or something. When you catch her in the act indoors, say "no" sternly, then take her outside and praise her. Even if she doesn't go just then. Eventually she will figure out "going outside is good, going indoors is bad."

    But remember . . . she is just a baby. So this learning process may take awhile. It could take months. Be patient. And never scold her for a mess if you weren't there to catch her in the act. There is no point. She will already have forgotten about it.

    Also, you want to make sure that you get rid of all the pee smell inside, because smelling it is a signal to her that "this is an appropriate place to pee." And just because you can't smell anything doesn't mean she can't. For carpeting, Nature's Miracle or other enzyme based cleaners will get rid of the smell completely, but I'm not sure if it is okay to use on wood. (Should be okay to use on tile.)

    Finally, when I say "praise her like crazy" for going outdoors, I really mean like crazy. Use a high-pitched happy voice, jump up and down excitedly, use that "WHO'S A GOOD PUPPY, YOOOOU AAAARE" baby talk, the whole nine yards. Not just "Good dog." You want to convey to your pup that she has just done the BEST THING EVER!!!11oneOMG

  • TheRoadVirusTheRoadVirus I will show you why hurricanes are named after peopleRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    ceres wrote: »
    All baby animal threads require pictures of some sort of the baby animal where possible. I don't know why this rule is not written down, but it should be.

    Spoilered For Possible Huge
    Spoiler:

    TDPforum.png
    New ep. every Monday. On iTunes and Android podcast apps!. Subscribe by Email
    PM with questions/critiques, or if we are not showing up in your app of choice.

    PSN: The_Road_Virus Twitch: The_Road_Virus Steam: TheRoadVirus AMAZON WISHLIST
  • TheRoadVirusTheRoadVirus I will show you why hurricanes are named after peopleRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    LadyM wrote: »
    Things

    We have been using the nature's miracle stuff, and it seems like she's not going in the same place every time, so I guess it's working?

    I'm going to work more on the leash thing, as she hates being on it and basically flops on the floor and refuses to move.
    Maybe this will help me get her used to the leash AND going outside? Hmmm that could work.

    Thanks everyone for all the advice!

    TDPforum.png
    New ep. every Monday. On iTunes and Android podcast apps!. Subscribe by Email
    PM with questions/critiques, or if we are not showing up in your app of choice.

    PSN: The_Road_Virus Twitch: The_Road_Virus Steam: TheRoadVirus AMAZON WISHLIST
  • L Ron HowardL Ron Howard Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Use kibble. Dogs are usually extremely motivated by food. We trained my dog in two weeks as a puppy, and he was like maybe three months old, no joke or exaggeration.
    And as Kate said, you also have to observe what her warning signs are for going to the bathroom. If you see her doing the behavior or see the signs, preemptively throw the leash on her and take her outside, then reward her when she pees and whatever in the grass.

    steam_sig.png
    NNID - bejamus | ESO - (at)guinneapig
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    If she's reacting poorly to being put on the leash, consider just leaving the leash attached, or sometimes put the leash on and don't take her out, just leave her to be to run about or chill in the house with leash on. This way being on the leash isn't an activity where you're forcing her to do something she doesn't want to do.

    Having the leash attached also has the benefit that you can stop her (by stepping on the leash) is she's headed somewhere you don't want (out the door, going after food, charging the cat, etc.).

  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    they have those shorty leashes as well, if you don't want a full 6 foot leash trailing behind a doggie at all times.

Sign In or Register to comment.