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The Witcher 3: Horse training simulator.

DeaderinredDeaderinred Registered User regular
edited November 2013 in Games and Technology
734765_10151293602899331_1302707356_n.png

UGHHH!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TZ_G6XiHoUA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_956308&feature=iv&src_vid=TZ_G6XiHoUA&v=2HGhm0H7d68

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt will be released in 2014 for PC and "all the latest consoles."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=weCw2s2U3Rw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8gIsYuPIKco

witcher3cover610.jpg
Cade wrote: »
Prisca wrote: »
- In contrast to the last game, Geralt encounters communities and individuals with monster-related problems that need solving
- There aren’t contract-like assignments this time
- Press the left trigger to turn on Geralt’s witcher senses
- Can glean information from a crime scene upon discovering it
- Within range of a scene of interest, the mechanic conveys clues to the player through the witcher muttering to himself and/or visual depictions of past events that represent Geralt’s reasoning
- Time of day and other conditions determine where monsters appear and their abilities
- Can strike critical areas in combat based on how much you learn about monster anatomy and tactics
- The team is deciding between using a handful of in-combat special moves for particular attacks and a slow-motion quick-time event style
- Monsters you defeat leave otherwise unobtainable alchemical and crafting ingrediants needed for making of unique items, potions, mutagens
- These allow Geralt to gain special powers and upgrades in the new mutation development tree
- These kills serve as the witcher’s primary method of income
- Moving more toward romance and away from shallow sexual encounters
- “We want to treat it maturely like we did in The Witcher 2. We are not bringing sex cards back.”
- Witcher 3 doesn’t have completely different environments based on singular choices due to the open world, but there are similarly impactful decisions
- You’ll be involved with mutually exclusive storylines and situations based on certain momentous choices
- Won’t be on the same level as Witcher 2, however
- Game mechanics based on previous games, but the team is revisiting many details
- Backward difficulty curve being addressed
- Rewroking the flow of combat
- 96 animations for Geralt’s combat moves (last game had 20)
- Game has a “weighting” system for the camera to help keep the biggest threats in frame at all times
- Combat system: three big changes to solve the problem of being locked into long animations
- Every button prss mapped to a single strike
- Each move takes a roughly equivalent time to perforom
- Can always interrupt your current action to immediately dodge or block
- Can block/dodge when out of stamina, but you’ll be staggered
- Team wants to make the combat “more intimate”
- “You don’t run – in the Witcher 2 you were running constantly. You walk, but your attacks are very fast. Your opponents also walk but they have charges and things like that.”
- Geralt’s dodge roll replaced by a pivot move
- It retains its defensive utility without game-breaking mobility
- Attacks faster than in The Witcher 2
- Enemy AI completely rebuilt
- No scripted boss encounters
- One boss: ice giant
- Roughly a dozen types of interactive objects
- Ex: Can irritate a wasp with the telekinetic Aard sign to make a damaging distraction for his foes and disperse the swarm with the fiery Igni sign once the wasp swarm becomes a problem
- Magical signs are retooled
- Each of the five signs has a basic form such as Igni’s new flamethrower effect
- If the player advances down the magic tree as Geralt levels up, can unlock a second form of the sign
- For Igni, would unlock a 360-degree blast that immolates anything close
- Yrdren’s small trap can be changed into a bigger field that slows enemies
- Player retains the use of the basic form
- Other two trees are based on swordsmanship and alchemy
- Swordfighting: can unlock new strikes and boosts such as improved stanima and parrying
- Alchemy: mutation mechanic moved off to a separate development path, independent of the level-up process
- Alchemy specialization is based more on potions
- Improvements available for the horse and boat
- These aspects are still in development
- One idea: players could access their long-term storage stash from their horse as well as from inns
- Team knows about frustrating inventory management in Witcher 2
- Crafting still important for enhancing Geralt’s capabilities
- Can customize crafted items
- Some components are can be substituted for similar things
- Ex: monster scales instead of leather in a piece of armor
- This affects the properties of the final item
- Can find unique components as part of monster hunts or questlines
- Combine these with special recipes to make artifacts of immense power
- Each armor piece has a unique appearance
- Armor has improved presentation and new cloth simulation
- Can visit a barber to change Geralt’s hairstyle
http://gamingeverything.com/39177/witcher-3-confirmed-is-next-gen-featured-in-game-informer/
Suriko wrote: »
http://www.gram.pl/news/2013/02/05/pierwsze-informacje-o-wiedzminie-3.shtml

Warning: machine translation ahead:
The project is two times bigger than the team over the previous part of the
There will be chapters, acts, or other artificial cutscenes
Geralt no longer have memory blackouts and try to regain the lost love, will work on behalf of the empires of the north, which demanded independence and face the Wild Gon
The team felt that the Witcher missing unfettered freedom and open world as Skyrimie
Fighting back the horse is still in the testing phase, it is not yet clear whether the game will be
Ships will float on the water - will be subject to the laws of physics and react realistically on the waves
Geralt can travel from one end of the world to another with no visible loading the world through RED engine 3
The game world will be 40x larger than in the previous game (about 20% higher than in Skyrimie)
To traverse the world on horseback from one end to the other, you'll need 30-40 minutes
You can travel on foot, on horseback or by boat
For each location can be discovered rapidly move through a system of fast travel
As he says, Konrad Tomaszkiewicz, to developers is to provide high quality mission cutscenes and highlights
Interesting place and beautiful views will always be in sight, what will suspend eye
Players will be encouraged to explore the musty caves, villages struggling and decaying ruins
The Witcher 3 will offer more than 100 hours hand-designed mission
Tasks, among other things, will involve assisting residents or rightful kings of Skellig
Hunting monsters is an adventure, and will provide a source of income to acquire unique awards
You will be able to participate in various mini-games, depending on the area and receive a special prize for it, but not required, to complete the story
For example, in Skellig competition will consist of throwing knives
Monsters, bandits, merchants and animals will attack anyone they consider an enemy
There will be no level-scaling
Of course, there will gain rewards and levels by fighting monsters and men
Three different aspects of the story - hunting monsters, and deal with the little things, the political situation and the search for his love of Geralt
In addition to performing the main tasks will be free to hunt monsters produce things and deal with reinterpretations of quests
In the game, the political situation and attack Nilfgaard will be presented in the main thread, covering key areas: Skellig, Novigard and No Man's Land
Each region has its own storyline
You totally do not worry about the main plot, but must deal with the consequences - this is one of the possible choices
Various threads in the story will intertwine and complement each other
You will not need to do anything beyond the main thread to finish the game
Upon completion of certain topics in a way you can get help in the important battle of ally gained in Skellig
Highlights the main thread will affect the situation in the world. For example, if some thugs threatened the villagers, the job may disappear after certain events, if the player does not help them
Weather effects are dynamically generated and fully modeled as clouds are characterized by volume, not painted on the plane of the sky
In contrast to the previous section, Geralt will meet community and individuals who have problems with monsters
This time, there is no mission-like contracts
The left trigger on the pad activates the senses witcher
After examining the crime scene, you can get information and collect them, they are also a source of residents
Players will receive instructions - for example, the witcher is muttering to himself or hint will be presented in a visual, such as a scene from the past
The time of day and other conditions will affect the appearance of monsters and their ability
During the fight you can hit the soft spots, depending on the knowledge of the monster and used tactics
Developers still wondering how it will be carried out during the fight, and the special attacks QTE sequences in slow motion
The monsters can be defeated gather alchemical ingredients (not available anywhere else), the ingredients needed to craft unique items, potions and mutagens
With mutagenom Geralt gets special powers and develops them
The game set on the deeper feeling, not a fleeting romance - male-female relations will be handled in a mature way, as in the "talon" - you can not collect the cards
Decisions in The Witcher 3 will be just as important as the "talon", but because the game world is open, it will not completely change under the influence of player
Depending on major decisions, the player will be placed in other situations and will be able to play special storylines
The game is based on the previous section, but many of the details change
Addresses the issue of decreasing the level of difficulty
The fight has been redesigned to provide liquidity
Geralt will have 96 different animations in battle (in the previous game was 20)
The camera was designed by the staff at all times were the greatest threat
The fight was made three important changes to solve the problem of getting stuck in too long animations
Each press is one beat, and every movement requires roughly the same amount of time to perform
You can at any time interrupt the action to dodge or block a blow
Geralt can still block and dodge to do when he runs out of stamina, but will lose the balance
The creators wanted to fight was "more personal"
The Witcher 2 ran all the time, in the "top three" in the matter, but attacks are very fast, opponents also do not run, but they can include charge
Attacks are faster than the Witcher 2
Reprogrammed intelligence opponents
There is no boss fights scripted or 'canned
Geralt will face the ice giant
About 12 different types of objects, which can be made to interact. For example, you can annoy wasp Aard sign to distract enemies or disperse a swarm Igni, when it starts to cause problems
The characters have been modernized - each character by investing in tree growth may change your action. Each character has a basic form, for example, looks like Igni flame thrower. Igni after the development of changes in the area attack glaring all around, and a small trap Yrden You can change a lot of room for not enemies. What is important is the improvement can also use the basic forms of characters
The other two trees are associated with the development of sword mastery, and alchemy
In the case of the sword unlocks new moves and items such as increased strength and evaporation
In the case of alchemy mechanics mutations were separated from the gain the next level
Expertise in alchemy depends mainly on potions
Both the horse and the boat can be improved
Players have access to the box for both their horse and in the taverns
The team is aware that the management of inventory in the "talon" was uncomfortable, but this time it will be different
Manufactured items can be personalized
Some components may be replaced by other, similar - for example, can be used instead of skin scales monster, which affects the properties of the formed object
Unique components can be found while hunting monsters or doing tasks
Using them, using a special recipe, allows you to create powerful artifact
Each element of the armor has a unique look
Armor looks better, improved the simulation of the movement of clothes
You can visit the barber and change Geralt hairstyle
The game does not run out of puzzle solving
The Witcher 3 will be released in 2014 for PC and "all the latest consoles." CDPR does not speak directly about the next-genes, but we can assume that it is just for them. On the cover of the game was described as "a new generation RPG."


This is a thread about witchering, and witchering in general, now in awesome sequel form!



Buy it from gog.com now! (or steam, or those brick shops)

New to the series? get the witcher here cheaper than a Vizima hooker! You can even import your save game into the sequel!




Its also set after books! Lookout for "The Last Wish" (short stories about witchering and the story of the intro from witcher 1) and "The Blood of Elves" (The first part in the witcher saga) in your bookstore of choice today! the next book is out in 2012! (but if you are polish and/or can read polish you have all them already!) Get more info here

and its also a polish tv series/movie but you less you know about that the better.
wiedzmin01.jpg

toldya.

WTH is a witcher you say?
i-3CnvcCW.jpg

Witcher 1 and Witcher 2 mods can be found at
http://witcher.nexusmods.com/

Learn how to not suck at Witcher 2 combat, from our very own BlackDove.
*note video may contain chapter 1 spoilers*
BlackDove wrote: »
Okay, here it is (when Youtube goddamn processes it)

Low level fighting. Using the most simplistic skills. The game is piss easy.

Somebody put this in the OP, and reference it whenever someone comes to complain about how the fighting is hard.

This is all you need to do to win. Normal difficulty. There's no problem to be had.

This is all Chapter 1, so I doubt the fight with Letho spoils anything. Maybe put a spoiler warning on it if you think it's a problem.

I went through these fights a few times just so you can see that it's not a problem replicating this kind of behavior.

It's not like I'm playing fucking flawlessly either. I'm making TONS of mistakes in these videos. Some because I'm just trying to lower my skill level as much as possible and trying to mash the buttons and emulate how a monkey would play it, others because FRAPS will offload the work onto random threads on the CPU and when it offloads onto one the game uses, the framerate goes to -2.

Either way, tons of mistakes, yet I still win every time.

You can, and will too.

I'm told spoilers start at 6:10. I don't agree, but you've been warned anyway.

Ask yourself, seriously.

Ask yourself, "Am I a duck"?


Then try to be more like Foltest.

RmAs1.gif

(i remember now why i dont make threads. :?)

Deaderinred on
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Posts

  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    i still love that gif at the end. XD

    RxI0N.png
    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • MongerMonger I got the ham stink. Dallas, TXRegistered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Odrin would approve of the thread title.

    Have you seen Odrin around?

    OOOOOODDDDDDDDRRRRRIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNN

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Damn them all for not releasing the entire book series stateside. I want to read all of them right now... but I can only read english (well, with any amount of comprehension).

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • AnteCantelopeAnteCantelope Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Fairly late-game spoilers:
    Letho says that he and his two pals whose names I've forgotten were involved in this plan. In that case, who's the guy Geralt kills at the end of the first game? The witcher trying to kill Foltest? Letho seemed to imply that there were only those three witchers, and since you definitely see the other two later, it can't be any of them. Is it a fourth witcher who's never mentioned, is it unrelated (witcher assassinating a king? Seems pretty unlikely), a plothole, or did I just miss the explanation?

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Where do you see two others?

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • CadeCade Eppur si muove.Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Odrin.

    Oddddddddrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrin, where are you.

    Odrin, Odrin where are you boy.

    Odrrrrrrrrrrrrrriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.

  • AntithesisAntithesis Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Okay fine curly, you were entirely right about that frustrating bit. (Also, I was amused when I found the aaagh boots part in-game.)

    Is there a list anywhere of things affected by a TW1 import?

    Things I noticed:
    Iorveth in TW2, Scoia'tael in TW1:

    -The "end" of the Cockatrice quest is right at the beginning of the Prologue.

    -I found a messenger in Flotsam from Thaler. Got Thaler's opinion on Roche and a package that I remember being a recipe of some sort.

    -I talked about Yaevinn with Iorveth at the end of Chapter 1 and during Chapter 2. Was interesting, and even offered some meta commentary on why aiding the Scoia'tael in TW1 wouldn't and doesn't change everything, everywhere in TW2.

    -I found a representative of Vivaldi's (ahem, the Vivaldis') bank in Vergen and he told me that Vivaldi had given me unlimited credit. He only had about 300 orens with him, though.

    -The Order of the Flaming Rose camp outside of Loc Muinn attacked me immediately, I had no option but to sneak in with Iorveth. (Maybe that changes by path, though, I haven't done Roche yet.) Shame, because the quest text hinted that I could go there to see if anyone from Vizima was around.

    Question on what you have with you at the start of the game:
    I don't remember my equipment at the end of TW1- are the Herbalist's Gloves and Mage's Trousers imported, or were those DLC?

  • AnteCantelopeAnteCantelope Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Where do you see two others?
    You fight them in Roche's path.

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Where do you see two others?
    You fight them in Roche's path.

    Ah that would explain it. Next playthrough then.

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • SoundsPlushSoundsPlush yup, back. Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Things I noticed:
    -The Order of the Flaming Rose camp outside of Loc Muinn attacked me immediately, I had no option but to sneak in with Iorveth. (Maybe that changes by path, though, I haven't done Roche yet.) Shame, because the quest text hinted that I could go there to see if anyone from Vizima was around.
    On my Order import/Roche path, there were three different conversation options depending on when I walked up to the guards: before Roche got there, when Roche was talking (in which case he was involved in the conversation, "Oh, here he is!"; and after. Depending on which, they'd let me in right off the bat or be all "uhhh the kingslayer?" until I was all, "maybe you should ask the grandmaster whose life I saved," and they're all "oooh." And then you meet with Siegfriend and bro it up.

    The equipment you ask about are DLC.
    Fairly late-game spoilers:
    Letho says that he and his two pals whose names I've forgotten were involved in this plan. In that case, who's the guy Geralt kills at the end of the first game? The witcher trying to kill Foltest? Letho seemed to imply that there were only those three witchers, and since you definitely see the other two later, it can't be any of them. Is it a fourth witcher who's never mentioned, is it unrelated (witcher assassinating a king? Seems pretty unlikely), a plothole, or did I just miss the explanation?
    Retcon as far as I can tell. They say Demavend was the first targeted, so it's kind of a weird paradox with Geralt being hired to protect Foltest after he saved him from an assassin that didn't exist. That or they just neglect to mention there's another snake school witcher on the same path and it's just Letho, Serrit, and Auckes that targeted Demavend first, which makes mroe sense since the other would be a midgame retcon.

    s7Imn5J.png
  • ZxerolZxerol Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Question on what you have with you at the start of the game:
    I don't remember my equipment at the end of TW1- are the Herbalist's Gloves and Mage's Trousers imported, or were those DLC?

    Retailer pre-order DLC that was included for everyone in patch 1.2.

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Things I noticed:
    -The Order of the Flaming Rose camp outside of Loc Muinn attacked me immediately, I had no option but to sneak in with Iorveth. (Maybe that changes by path, though, I haven't done Roche yet.) Shame, because the quest text hinted that I could go there to see if anyone from Vizima was around.
    On my Order import/Roche path, there were three different conversation options depending on when I walked up to the guards: before Roche got there, when Roche was talking (in which case he was involved in the conversation, "Oh, here he is!"; and after. Depending on which, they'd let me in right off the bat or be all "uhhh the kingslayer?" until I was all, "maybe you should ask the grandmaster whose life I saved," and they're all "oooh." And then you meet with Siegfriend and bro it up.

    The equipment you ask about are DLC.
    Fairly late-game spoilers:
    Letho says that he and his two pals whose names I've forgotten were involved in this plan. In that case, who's the guy Geralt kills at the end of the first game? The witcher trying to kill Foltest? Letho seemed to imply that there were only those three witchers, and since you definitely see the other two later, it can't be any of them. Is it a fourth witcher who's never mentioned, is it unrelated (witcher assassinating a king? Seems pretty unlikely), a plothole, or did I just miss the explanation?
    Retcon as far as I can tell. They say Demavend was the first targeted, so it's kind of a weird paradox with Geralt being hired to protect Foltest after he saved him from an assassin that didn't exist. That or they just neglect to mention there's another snake school witcher on the same path and it's just Letho, Serrit, and Auckes that targeted Demavend first, which makes mroe sense since the other would be a midgame retcon.

    You can't retcon yourself in the same game.

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Zxerol wrote: »
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Question on what you have with you at the start of the game:
    I don't remember my equipment at the end of TW1- are the Herbalist's Gloves and Mage's Trousers imported, or were those DLC?

    Retailer pre-order DLC that was included for everyone in patch 1.2.

    Which made all of my saves over encumbered. Woo!

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • AntithesisAntithesis Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Are there any boots of renown at any point, by the way?

  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    to pick up the tail end of the last thread:
    Javen wrote: »
    i think i figured out why letho's situation is so awesome:
    you're the second fiddle semi-bad guy to his plot-armored protagonist.

    the game fundamentally isn't about your quest, it's about letho's. :D letho's the one who gets all the information, he's the one who gets all the support and funding, he's the one who gets to complete his tasks despite your flailing efforts to stop him.

    furthermore, you're the guy who he spares because he doesn't think you're really bad, just on the wrong side at the time. he doesn't want to kill you. in fact, he'd like it if you exited stage left and went away to retire with your honey. you and he were bros at one time, and in honor of that memory, he only wants the best for you. so please stay out of his way.

    this makes the ending even more amazing, because you realize that letho beat the game, not you. he's the one who gets to see it all come together. he's the one who gets to have the fairy tale ending. you? you're just the slightly incompetent not-really-a-bad-guy who's confused and misguided and wears a :| face most of the time. in fact, letho still likes that about you, you lovable blunderer! you were never the planning sort of guy, never had an ounce of the guile that living in the south requires. and if you went off on some crusade to save the north instead of rescuing triss from the nilfgaardians, well, he'll rescue her FOR you because he's a decent sort and what are friends for?

    it's bloody brilliant. :D

    Everything here is technically correct, except the conclusion you draw from it.
    Villains are very often more informed and secure in their position than the protagonist. They're always the ones making the grand schemes (Letho) and having them ultimately foiled by the hero (Geralt). That's what provides so much tension in the conflict. True, the story is primarily about Letho's plans, because you spend the entire game chasing him and trying to end them. Malak in kotor, for example. Malak's the one with all the cards, information, resources, and most of the game is just tracking him down. The movement of the plot is fueled by Malak, but no one would claim that the game is about him more than the character you play.

    Letho didn't beat the game, because ultimately you prevent him from achieving his goal. You claim Letho is the "plot armored protagonist" and then cite an instance where he could easily end you, but lets you go cause he owes you one, I guess, the meaning isn't really relevant to the dynamic.

    The dynamic is still pretty interesting, because both Witchers in this case are simultaneously acting on their own personal agenda, while at the same time being used as proxy for opposing nations. There's no personal animosity between them, which is why neither are in a huge hurry to kill each other.
    i don't think we can gauge anyone in the witcherverse as a traditional villain. to me, geralt and letho are extremely similar; there's not the difference in motivation or gulf in perspective that really make them incompatible. the interesting thing is that in a swapped position (a council of northern kings wants geralt to assassinate the emperor of nilfgaard in return for reestablishing and rebuilding the school of the wolf. oh, and refusal = death), i'm pretty sure geralt would have to do the same thing. it's a Tale of Two Witchers, really. both trying to stay alive, keep their friends alive, and stay true to their witcher roots and upbringing.

    RxI0N.png
    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • WolfprintWolfprint Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Are there any boots of renown at any point, by the way?
    Only the Elder Blood boots, which you will come across as part of the main game.


    Okay more sandbox Witcher game ideas percolating in my head:

    An awesome setting would be the years between Geralt's book-death/mysterious disappearance and his reappearance in TW1. You play a Witcher from the School of the Wolf in Kaer Morhen, and Vesemir asks you to investigate rumours of a Witcher slain by a mob in the town of Rivia.

    You get to travel through most of Temeria, and maybe parts of Kaedwen, Redania and Aedirn. In Temeria you meet Foltest, who has his eyes on a new lady in court, Lousia La Valette. Adda is fairly young and bratty. In Aedirn/Kaedwen you hear rumours of a possible war Henselt is formenting - troops are being gathered near Brenna.

    You wander through towns, taking notices off crossroad signposts, slaying monsters for gold, lifting curses, killing mans. Through your travels you are often posed decisions where you have to choose between difficult choices - e.g. kill the last unicorn to save a dying prince.

  • TyberiusTyberius Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Seeing this thread title begs the question have there already been a "The Witcher 2: Witch Harder" and "The Witcher 2: Plough With A Whoreson"?

  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    Antithesis wrote: »
    Are there any boots of renown at any point, by the way?
    Only the Elder Blood boots, which you will come across as part of the main game.


    Okay more sandbox Witcher game ideas percolating in my head:

    An awesome setting would be the years between Geralt's book-death/mysterious disappearance and his reappearance in TW1. You play a Witcher from the School of the Wolf in Kaer Morhen, and Vesemir asks you to investigate rumours of a Witcher slain by a mob in the town of Rivia.

    You get to travel through most of Temeria, and maybe parts of Kaedwen, Redania and Aedirn. In Temeria you meet Foltest, who has his eyes on a new lady in court, Lousia La Valette. Adda is fairly young and bratty. In Aedirn/Kaedwen you hear rumours of a possible war Henselt is formenting - troops are being gathered near Brenna.

    You wander through towns, taking notices off crossroad signposts, slaying monsters for gold, lifting curses, killing mans. Through your travels you are often posed decisions where you have to choose between difficult choices - e.g. kill the last unicorn to save a dying prince.

    that sounds quite appealing.

    RxI0N.png
    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • Tim JamesTim James Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Fizban140 wrote: »
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    i feel bad, i still haven't palyed since i got to chapter 2 weeks ago.

    it's like i'm cheating on triss with other games instead of finding her

    :(

    I got stuck here too, except I am happy to cheat on Triss, whiny wench.
    Don't you hate how she slams the door in your face all the time? What a brat.


    More ending spoiler discussion:
    Javen wrote: »
    i think i figured out why letho's situation is so awesome:
    you're the second fiddle semi-bad guy to his plot-armored protagonist.

    the game fundamentally isn't about your quest, it's about letho's. :D letho's the one who gets all the information, he's the one who gets all the support and funding, he's the one who gets to complete his tasks despite your flailing efforts to stop him.

    furthermore, you're the guy who he spares because he doesn't think you're really bad, just on the wrong side at the time. he doesn't want to kill you. in fact, he'd like it if you exited stage left and went away to retire with your honey. you and he were bros at one time, and in honor of that memory, he only wants the best for you. so please stay out of his way.

    this makes the ending even more amazing, because you realize that letho beat the game, not you. he's the one who gets to see it all come together. he's the one who gets to have the fairy tale ending. you? you're just the slightly incompetent not-really-a-bad-guy who's confused and misguided and wears a :| face most of the time. in fact, letho still likes that about you, you lovable blunderer! you were never the planning sort of guy, never had an ounce of the guile that living in the south requires. and if you went off on some crusade to save the north instead of rescuing triss from the nilfgaardians, well, he'll rescue her FOR you because he's a decent sort and what are friends for?

    it's bloody brilliant. :D

    Everything here is technically correct, except the conclusion you draw from it.
    Villains are very often more informed and secure in their position than the protagonist. They're always the ones making the grand schemes (Letho) and having them ultimately foiled by the hero (Geralt). That's what provides so much tension in the conflict. True, the story is primarily about Letho's plans, because you spend the entire game chasing him and trying to end them. Malak in kotor, for example. Malak's the one with all the cards, information, resources, and most of the game is just tracking him down. The movement of the plot is fueled by Malak, but no one would claim that the game is about him more than the character you play.

    Letho didn't beat the game, because ultimately you prevent him from achieving his goal. You claim Letho is the "plot armored protagonist" and then cite an instance where he could easily end you, but lets you go cause he owes you one, I guess, the meaning isn't really relevant to the dynamic.

    The dynamic is still pretty interesting, because both Witchers in this case are simultaneously acting on their own personal agenda, while at the same time being used as proxy for opposing nations. There's no personal animosity between them, which is why neither are in a huge hurry to kill each other.
    This is why I think the decision to kill him goes way beyond whether you think he's an asshole or a sympathetic character in the end. He's somewhat of a parallel independent actor along with Geralt, but he's still constrained within the game. You can choose to literally end his character arc at this point and I think it felt right for higher/meta reasons like you guys are touching on. But I'm not an English lit major so I can't put my finger on exactly why.

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  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Tim James wrote: »
    Fizban140 wrote: »
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    i feel bad, i still haven't palyed since i got to chapter 2 weeks ago.

    it's like i'm cheating on triss with other games instead of finding her

    :(

    I got stuck here too, except I am happy to cheat on Triss, whiny wench.
    Don't you hate how she slams the door in your face all the time? What a brat.


    More ending spoiler discussion:
    Javen wrote: »
    i think i figured out why letho's situation is so awesome:
    you're the second fiddle semi-bad guy to his plot-armored protagonist.

    the game fundamentally isn't about your quest, it's about letho's. :D letho's the one who gets all the information, he's the one who gets all the support and funding, he's the one who gets to complete his tasks despite your flailing efforts to stop him.

    furthermore, you're the guy who he spares because he doesn't think you're really bad, just on the wrong side at the time. he doesn't want to kill you. in fact, he'd like it if you exited stage left and went away to retire with your honey. you and he were bros at one time, and in honor of that memory, he only wants the best for you. so please stay out of his way.

    this makes the ending even more amazing, because you realize that letho beat the game, not you. he's the one who gets to see it all come together. he's the one who gets to have the fairy tale ending. you? you're just the slightly incompetent not-really-a-bad-guy who's confused and misguided and wears a :| face most of the time. in fact, letho still likes that about you, you lovable blunderer! you were never the planning sort of guy, never had an ounce of the guile that living in the south requires. and if you went off on some crusade to save the north instead of rescuing triss from the nilfgaardians, well, he'll rescue her FOR you because he's a decent sort and what are friends for?

    it's bloody brilliant. :D

    Everything here is technically correct, except the conclusion you draw from it.
    Villains are very often more informed and secure in their position than the protagonist. They're always the ones making the grand schemes (Letho) and having them ultimately foiled by the hero (Geralt). That's what provides so much tension in the conflict. True, the story is primarily about Letho's plans, because you spend the entire game chasing him and trying to end them. Malak in kotor, for example. Malak's the one with all the cards, information, resources, and most of the game is just tracking him down. The movement of the plot is fueled by Malak, but no one would claim that the game is about him more than the character you play.

    Letho didn't beat the game, because ultimately you prevent him from achieving his goal. You claim Letho is the "plot armored protagonist" and then cite an instance where he could easily end you, but lets you go cause he owes you one, I guess, the meaning isn't really relevant to the dynamic.

    The dynamic is still pretty interesting, because both Witchers in this case are simultaneously acting on their own personal agenda, while at the same time being used as proxy for opposing nations. There's no personal animosity between them, which is why neither are in a huge hurry to kill each other.
    This is why I think the decision to kill him goes way beyond whether you think he's an asshole or a sympathetic character in the end. He's somewhat of a parallel independent actor along with Geralt, but he's still constrained within the game. You can choose to literally end his character arc at this point and I think it felt right for higher/meta reasons like you guys are touching on. But I'm not an English lit major so I can't put my finger on exactly why.
    To me, Letho and Geralt having the relationship they do, both with themselves and the world/conflict around them, the choice to fight or not to fight truly rests with the player. This isn't something that needs to happen to directly further anyones goals, neither will benefit from killing the other. Letho ultimately got the witcher school rebuilt, which doesn't interfere with Geralt at all, and Geralt got his memory back, which Letho couldn't really care less for. They're just two guys, with a score to settle, or not. It's entirely the players perogative whether there's unfinished business there. No rock or hard place, no one trying to convince you that their cause is the just one, just "do I really want to fight this guy?" It's something with no real wrong answer, because there's no right one either.

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  • WolfprintWolfprint Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Re Letho:
    I think for most players, they will choose to fight Letho, because it makes narrative sense for them. No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.

  • Tim JamesTim James Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Continuing end spoilers, but cutting down the nested quotes:
    Javen wrote: »
    To me, Letho and Geralt having the relationship they do, both with themselves and the world/conflict around them, the choice to fight or not to fight truly rests with the player. This isn't something that needs to happen to directly further anyones goals, neither will benefit from killing the other. Letho ultimately got the witcher school rebuilt, which doesn't interfere with Geralt at all, and Geralt got his memory back, which Letho couldn't really care less for. They're just two guys, with a score to settle, or not. It's entirely the players perogative whether there's unfinished business there. No rock or hard place, no one trying to convince you that their cause is the just one, just "do I really want to fight this guy?" It's something with no real wrong answer, because there's no right one either.
    What I'm saying is there's finished business there. Letho's character arc is over. The only natural choice is to end his life. Or maybe you'd rather leave it open-ended, and wonder if he's still out there.

    The amazing thing about that sequence is we get to decide. It's not up to the writer or the filmmaker. We get to choose whether to end that thread by ending that life.

    It's completely different from your choice about a useless side character like Sile. Letho is different. I just can't explain exactly why.
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    Re Letho:
    I think for most players, they will choose to fight Letho, because it makes narrative sense for them. No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.
    I think you're right. But it's not a shallow "jeez I need a boss fight here to feel good." It's the finality you get from closing a book.

    Except this time you get to decide whether his story lives on.

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  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    Re Letho:
    I think for most players, they will choose to fight Letho, because it makes narrative sense for them. No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.

    I think your stats will vary widely depending on the path people take

    End game spoilers
    If you choose to save Triss, Letho's just waiting for you in the square, seemingly at random. I chose to fight Letho then. If you help Roche rescue the girl, though, you find out that while you were doing that, Letho actually went and saved Triss FOR you. In that case, I think many people would be apt just to walk away

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  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Tim James wrote: »
    Continuing end spoilers, but cutting down the nested quotes:
    Javen wrote: »
    To me, Letho and Geralt having the relationship they do, both with themselves and the world/conflict around them, the choice to fight or not to fight truly rests with the player. This isn't something that needs to happen to directly further anyones goals, neither will benefit from killing the other. Letho ultimately got the witcher school rebuilt, which doesn't interfere with Geralt at all, and Geralt got his memory back, which Letho couldn't really care less for. They're just two guys, with a score to settle, or not. It's entirely the players perogative whether there's unfinished business there. No rock or hard place, no one trying to convince you that their cause is the just one, just "do I really want to fight this guy?" It's something with no real wrong answer, because there's no right one either.
    What I'm saying is there's finished business there. Letho's character arc is over. The only natural choice is to end his life. Or maybe you'd rather leave it open-ended, and wonder if he's still out there.

    The amazing thing about that sequence is we get to decide. It's not up to the writer or the filmmaker. We get to choose whether to end that thread by ending that life.

    It's completely different from your choice about a useless side character like Sile. Letho is different. I just can't explain exactly why.
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    Re Letho:
    I think for most players, they will choose to fight Letho, because it makes narrative sense for them. No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.
    I think you're right. It's not a shallow "jeez I need a boss fight here to feel good" but the finality you get from closing a book.

    Except this time you get to decide whether his story lives on.
    I think it's different because this is the point that the player has been looking forward to since the prologue. Only to find out that it's the most irrelevant choice to be made. To constantly be building up to this, and to find out that whatever you decide to do, it doesn't really matter. But at the same time, the motivation, reasoning, and justification behind the decision is solely in the hands of the player. There's no outside forces swaying the decision. It's both impotent and empowering at the same time.

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  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Javen wrote: »
    Tim James wrote: »
    Continuing end spoilers, but cutting down the nested quotes:
    Javen wrote: »
    To me, Letho and Geralt having the relationship they do, both with themselves and the world/conflict around them, the choice to fight or not to fight truly rests with the player. This isn't something that needs to happen to directly further anyones goals, neither will benefit from killing the other. Letho ultimately got the witcher school rebuilt, which doesn't interfere with Geralt at all, and Geralt got his memory back, which Letho couldn't really care less for. They're just two guys, with a score to settle, or not. It's entirely the players perogative whether there's unfinished business there. No rock or hard place, no one trying to convince you that their cause is the just one, just "do I really want to fight this guy?" It's something with no real wrong answer, because there's no right one either.
    What I'm saying is there's finished business there. Letho's character arc is over. The only natural choice is to end his life. Or maybe you'd rather leave it open-ended, and wonder if he's still out there.

    The amazing thing about that sequence is we get to decide. It's not up to the writer or the filmmaker. We get to choose whether to end that thread by ending that life.

    It's completely different from your choice about a useless side character like Sile. Letho is different. I just can't explain exactly why.
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    Re Letho:
    I think for most players, they will choose to fight Letho, because it makes narrative sense for them. No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.
    I think you're right. It's not a shallow "jeez I need a boss fight here to feel good" but the finality you get from closing a book.

    Except this time you get to decide whether his story lives on.
    I think it's different because this is the point that the player has been looking forward to since the prologue. Only to find out that it's the most irrelevant choice to be made. To constantly be building up to this, and to find out that whatever you decide to do, it doesn't really matter. But at the same time, the motivation, reasoning, and justification behind the decision is solely in the hands of the player. There's no outside forces swaying the decision. It's both impotent and empowering at the same time.


    It's very... witchery. The choice is entirely yours for whatever personal motivations you may have, not as part of some affiliation.

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • Tim JamesTim James Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Javen wrote: »
    I think it's different because this is the point that the player has been looking forward to since the prologue. Only to find out that it's the most irrelevant choice to be made. To constantly be building up to this, and to find out that whatever you decide to do, it doesn't really matter. But at the same time, the motivation, reasoning, and justification behind the decision is solely in the hands of the player. There's no outside forces swaying the decision. It's both impotent and empowering at the same time.
    Now you're talking. I hadn't considered the impotence of the decision either. I just feel like it works on a level above "is this guy an asshole or should I let him slide?" like we normally roleplay and decide in videogames.

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  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    if you look at the concrete things that both geralt and letho do in the game - killing kings, slaughtering hordes of hapless guards, destabilizing and establishing entire countries - they're really alike. both got sucked into politics against their own wishes, but both are determined to see things through.

    the question at the end is whether the player feels the conflict is personal or not.

    all i know is that letho never had any beef with geralt on a personal level. he worked with him to find the wild hunt, did his best to protect and safeguard yennefer, and even when presented with an opportunity to kill geralt, he chooses not to. he'll even save triss if you're off trying to save the north. that, to me, does not make him my enemy.

    on the other hand, he instigated massive instability in the northern kingdoms, goaded the lodge into going much further than they ever intended, and paved the way for invasion. not to mention killing foltest.

    gamers expect to save the world. they try to do it in the witcher 2, but endgames are always messy in the witcherverse. instead, they have to decide how to judge an old friend: by his shifting political allegiances, or by his steadfast personal loyalties.

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    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • WolfprintWolfprint Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    I wouldn't be surprised if letting Letho go at the end of TW2 makes facing The Wild Hunt (something CDP has been building up to) easier in TW3 (if it comes out). Especially since the School of the Snake is well-known for having amassed lore on the particular topic.

    A former nakama-turned-rival with in-depth knowledge of the Hunt now fighting alongside you? Hell yes.

    That said, I almost always fight and kill Letho at the end of the game. I am thinking - this is the guy who got Geralt into so much trouble by pinning the blame for kingslaying on someone he formerly calls a friend. Even if he has a knack for making up for it by saving my sorceress-babe-girlfriends, can I really let that slide? Couldn't he find another way of killing Foltest without getting Geralt involved? Geralt has no reputation for saintly forgiveness after all. There is added poignancy in fighting someone you know you used to drink and befriend.

    But sometimes it's just me needing to exercise my awesome Infinity Plus One steel sword one last time.

  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    on the other hand, it was also geralt's fault to some extent for crouching over foltest's dead body, sword in hand. :P that doesn't look very good.

    it speaks to some extent about letho's desire for normalcy after the game. when letho is hired/forced into being a kingslayer by the emperor, geralt is, as far as letho knows, dead/unavailable in cold hands of the wild hunt. i don't know if letho would have taken the job had he known that geralt would escape the wild hunt. in fact, i'm pretty sure that letho would have told the emperor to think twice about this whole kingslaying scheme if geralt had been still roaming the northern kingdoms. as it is, letho says he was very worried about geralt screwing things up. maybe that was a bit of guilt. maybe not. the point of the matter is that this scheme was hatched and put into motion on the assumption that geralt of rivia was out of the picture, permanently. shilard and the emperor are well aware of geralt's power to change a situation. i doubt they'd have planned such an audacious set of killings had they known he'd be back.

    also, from letho's experience with geralt, the white wolf tries to stay out of politics as much as possible. geralt and yennefer had been "retired" from the machinations of the outside world, and perhaps all geralt wanted was to settle down again to a quiet lifestyle. letho doesn't really have any reason to believe that geralt will be angry at him for killing these kings, except for pinning the blame on him - and that was a freak accident.

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    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • SoundsPlushSoundsPlush yup, back. Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    I just decided that the civilian population of four(*) nations being put through hell for his selfish motives required justice, not "go home and get your reward." Aside from the whole "witchers aren't assassins" thing, he didn't save Triss in my playthrough and didn't instead help Anais because obviously he doesn't give a shit if Anais dies since more chaos is better; I couldn't give him any points for sparing Geralt because he owed him his life in the first place, and having the basic decency to pay a debt isn't enough to exempt from a crime. After all, he'll go ahead and kill you if you lose the last fight with him, rather than incapacitate you and escape.

    I like Letho, though, and I like the decision because as others have just put it, it's entirely up to the player and there's no 'right' answer, which isn't always the case when games give you narrative decisions. I'll let him live on my less protect-people run.

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  • WolfprintWolfprint Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    About normalcy:
    He could be lying. We don't know. In fact we don't know much about Letho's motivations apart from what he tells us at the end of the game. He appears to be truthful; Serrit and Auckes would not be working alongside him if they too did not have similar motivations to rebuild the School of the Viper.

    But then, as the sorceresses can attest, Letho can be more than he seems. It is also possible that he is buttering you up and lying to you to get himself off the hook. Remember that when we necro-call Serrit/Auckes, we are seeing things only from their perspective. Letho could have been lying too.

    Also, I wonder if the dead assassin you encounter at the end of TW1/beginning of TW2 may have been more than a forgotten plot point. It may be that they forgot that there was a third guy, or there may have been more than one group of witcher-assassins, or that Letho is lying altogether.

  • curly haired boycurly haired boy Your Friendly Neighborhood Torgue Dealer Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    i'll tell you what's funny, though. :D
    talking to various sorceresses and having them dismiss letho as a dumb oaf

    he's been capitalizing on that his entire life. it's nice to have the big guy in a game be incredibly clever as well.

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    Registered just for the Mass Effect threads | Steam: click ^^^ | Origin: curlyhairedboy
  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    What's also nice is an advanced enough facial system (bones, texturing etc) to make it believable too.

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • AnteCantelopeAnteCantelope Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    One thing I like is that, even though I didn't fight Letho, and probably won't in future plays, he's not unequivocally good, and I can definitely understand someone deciding to kill him.

  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    One thing I like is that, even though I didn't fight Letho, and probably won't in future plays, he's not unequivocally good, and I can definitely understand someone deciding to kill him.
    It's definitely one of quite a few decisions where I sat back and thought about it for a long while. The game had instances where I honestly took a break and walked away from the computer for a few minutes and thought about it while I did something else.

    Save Triss? Kill Saskia (if you don't have the dagger)? What about Henselt? And even the very beginning speaking with Foltest... he asks you about the assassin. I immediately recalled that in The Witcher 1 when The Lady of the Lake christened me and passed along Aerondight I was made to swear an oath of honesty... so I told him the truth. But I hemmed and hawed for awhile about it... since not telling him anything wasn't necessarily lying... and was potentially safer.

    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • WolfprintWolfprint Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    One thing I like is that, even though I didn't fight Letho, and probably won't in future plays, he's not unequivocally good, and I can definitely understand someone deciding to kill him.
    It's definitely one of quite a few decisions where I sat back and thought about it for a long while. The game had instances where I honestly took a break and walked away from the computer for a few minutes and thought about it while I did something else.

    Save Triss? Kill Saskia (if you don't have the dagger)? What about Henselt? And even the very beginning speaking with Foltest... he asks you about the assassin. I immediately recalled that in The Witcher 1 when The Lady of the Lake christened me and passed along Aerondight I was made to swear an oath of honesty... so I told him the truth. But I hemmed and hawed for awhile about it... since not telling him anything wasn't necessarily lying... and was potentially safer.

    Too bad that did not quite have an impact we were expecting. But a good bit of foreshadowing nevertheless.

    On another note, I think the idea of clothing/armour pockets is a good idea. I just wish they were used more creatively, like a form of added "soft difficulty" in combat scenarios. For example, you can only access stuff you put in your pockets, and not the rest of your inventory, when fighting. This would have allowed potion-drinking in combat, but still retained the tactical elements and difficulty. "This leather jacket has five pockets. Do I fill them all with Swallow potions, or do I want to fill some of them with daggers and bombs?" Or "The hardened jacket has five pockets, but lower overall stats than the combat armour. But the combat armour has fewer pockets. What should I use?"

  • HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited June 2011
    just curious, has there been any talk of a 1.3 patch at all?

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  • EnigEnig a.k.a. Ansatz Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Woo, finally finished Witcher 1. So excited to start the sequel. Gonna pick it up tomorrow :)

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    Steam (Ansatz) || GW2 officer (Ansatz.6498)
  • SpoitSpoit *twitch twitch* Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    You can't retcon yourself in the same game.

    Sure you can. DA2 does it to your "choices" all the time :P

    EDIT:
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.

    Off topic, but I've made the argument before that kotor2's ending would have been significantly stronger, or at least more fitting with the themes it presented, if it had ended at dantooine, rather than tacking on the boss rush at the end

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  • hailthefishhailthefish Registered User regular
    edited June 2011
    Spoit wrote: »
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    You can't retcon yourself in the same game.

    Sure you can. DA2 does it to your "choices" all the time :P

    EDIT:
    Wolfprint wrote: »
    No game feels complete without a satisfying end-boss fight with suitable denouement.

    Off topic, but I've made the argument before that kotor2's ending would have been significantly stronger, or at least more fitting with the themes it presented, if it had ended at dantooine, rather than tacking on the boss rush at the end

    Similarly off topic, that game was unsatisfyingly short already, though I agree that the unfinished, semi-sensical cliche-orgy of an ending would have been better off left out. Or, you know, actually finished.

    On an on-topic note, I love Witcher 2, but it's difficult to sort of gather the wherewithal to play. It's not a drop in, load up, and play a while game, it's a deliberate sit-down-and-schedule-a-block-of-time game. I miss games like this.

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