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Useful things you learned from games

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Posts

  • NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action Still AwesomeRegistered User regular
    edited February 2007
    To steer this back to (video) gamin...
    I learned how to properly shoot a movie given a limited resource (wiether it's time or money) and you're best bet is to shoot a shit load of film and try and shoot everything involving a given set all at once, then clean it up in the editing room

    Thanks "The Movies"

  • JimmyNavioJimmyNavio Registered User
    edited February 2007
    A good friend of mine from Brasil learned English from games like Resident Evil and Final Fantasy, and now speaks it with almost no accent.

    steam_sig.png
  • DavoidDavoid Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    That the princess is -always- in another castle.

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  • gtrmpgtrmp Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    Titmouse wrote: »
    Everybody wants some rye.

    'Course we do!

  • tarnoktarnok Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    Endure. In enduring, grow stronger.

    Wii Code:
    0431-6094-6446-7088
  • MonkeydryeMonkeydrye Registered User
    edited February 2007
    I read a book on the Gamer Generation (people who grew up on gaming vs those who didn't). One of the big things it pointed out is that non-gamers are FAR less good at multitasking, or changing gears on work projects, gamers are not only better at it, but do poorly at only doing one task at a time. They tend to want to juggle several tasks.
    It also pointed out that gamers like challenges, and improving their skills.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Namel3ssNamel3ss Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    I learned a tremendous amount about geography and the history of European countries fighting for the "new world" in the SNES game: New Horizons: Uncharted Waters.

    If you havn't played this fairly rare game, it really is a must in my opinion. I recommend finding an emulator/ROM for this, if you can't find it, PM me and I can zip up the ROM for you. It was the first game I ever played for huge (greater than 8 hours) stretches at a time.

    You can learn quite abit about economics in Eve:Online if you take the time to look.

    May the wombat of happiness snuffle through your underbrush.
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    I've learned that obstacles can be overcome by flooding the area with things that are cheap and easily mass produced. Once things start to go south simply tech up, and counter with better mass produced things.

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  • shutzshutz Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    Now that I've had a bit more time to think about it since starting this thread, I came up with one thing I learned from video games, and perfected through general use of computers, especially surfing the web:

    The ability to quickly see the important information on a screen, page, poster, etc. It started with games such as Dragon Warrior and Final Fantasy on the NES, in battles: you rarely have to read all the text, you just have to zero-in on the numbers and a couple of important words.

    Now, when I'm using the computer, if I get some sort of popup or dialog, I can quickly determine what it's about, and if I need to read further or not, within less than a second. And on the www, I can quickly zero-in to the information I'm looking for (assuming the page is laid out with some sort of logic, and not the completely incoherent ramblings of a madman -- www.timecube.com , for example) or figure out if the page is likely to have the info I need.

    When I watch my father (who is far from being a "stupid" man) try to use the computer, especially surfing the web, and I see him read each and every little thing he sees, in case it might be relevant, I can't help but feel pity for him. Then again, he knows way more than me about repairing stuff such as cars, appliances, etc. I'm useless with manual tasks.

    Creativity begets criticism.
    Check out my new blog: http://50wordstories.ca
    Also check out my old game design blog: http://stealmygamedesigns.blogspot.com
  • KaputaKaputa Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    "Colonel" is not pronounced "ko-loan-el" sciencepn1.gif

    Thanks, Mega Man X4!

  • Jon 118Jon 118 Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    Monkeydrye wrote: »
    I read a book on the Gamer Generation (people who grew up on gaming vs those who didn't). One of the big things it pointed out is that non-gamers are FAR less good at multitasking, or changing gears on work projects, gamers are not only better at it, but do poorly at only doing one task at a time. They tend to want to juggle several tasks.
    It also pointed out that gamers like challenges, and improving their skills.
    You know what? This explains SO much about my study habits, and how I react to working under pressure.

    What have games taught me? If at first you don't suceed, then try, try again. True, in real life you don't usually get dozens of attempts, but the theory is sound...

    Tarranon wrote:
    When I was little my sister once convinced me that I was the Antichrist. I spent the rest of the week worrying about it and basically trying to figure out how to escape destiny.
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