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Would you freeze yourself?

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Posts

  • LucidLucid Registered User regular
    eh, i'm only interested if in the future there is a cure for death.

    if so, then freeze my ass. i hate, and am terrified by, the notion of ceasing to be. there is so much that i want to do, and i really really like being alive.
    You could always hedge your bets on quantum immortality.

  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    ugh please no

    I'd rather not asymptotically approach death for eternity

  • AbsalonAbsalon Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Just stop the DNA strings from fraying when DNA replication occurs, and figure out a way to halt, reverse or compensate for the chemical processes that cause aging and the deterioration of the body.

    Frankly, I can't see how the neurological activity and electrical pattern in the brain could be preserved (or replicated) and then stored - who we "can be" at any one time is based on a unique pattern of neurons in the entire brain, and what we when do from there consists of a comically complicated patter of electrical activity.

    The basis of 'humanhood' is a unique maze that would take a massive amount of data to describe, and then the activity inside of this maze would also have to be simulated, and the resulting effect of this activity on the maze would have to be accounted for as well. So it's possible to 'run' existence as a program, but I can't even picture how much storage and processing capacity this would require.

    Much easier to use the fields of medicine and science to just hinder natural aging.

    As for effective freezing - as in a crapshoot that doesn't doom me into becoming an inert popsicle, but might not ever lead to me being resuscitated in a desirable way, I would consider it unless my relatives at the time would be pained from me not really dying in a definite way. Hope is painful, and not knowing whether a parent will ever return or stay dead can't be fun.

    Absalon on
    Ceejoyner wrote:
    Pick up artists and garbage men should switch names.
  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    How far are off from being able to scan a brain to the cellular level (or ideally a whole body). You wouldn't need to model the person's thoughts or keep them occupied in a virtual world (though you could if you had the technology, I just think that's a huge step off from a high definition brain scan), just use it as a map or instruction booklet at the other end. T
    hat seems a more useful version than cryogenics as it'd keep working when you had been restored as well whilst also a lot easier to store.

    The other thing I've wondered about is whether or not the Cyrogenics facilities also do any insurance type deals, though they're closer to loans or savings. You set up an account to pay them for storing your head/pattern and to also invest the money, and after a set number of years (or when the technology comes out to re-sleeve you) you come out and claim the interest. Once you've got the tech, it's then literally Life Insurance but then you've not got the extreme culture shock and lack of useful abilities that the first guys have to come to terms with.

  • ElitistbElitistb Registered User regular
    Why would you want to scan them like that? A duplicate of me wouldn't be me, regardless of what you did for it.

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  • joshofalltradesjoshofalltrades His love is a prize Rantin' and RavenRegistered User regular
    Why are we all talking about death like it's a bad thing? People need to die. It's bad enough that they're inflicted on us now; I don't want the Glenn Becks, Terry Goodkinds and Flavor Flavs/George Lopezes living forever in a future where they can spout terrible things, write terribly and be terrible respectively for all eternity.

    ElJeffe wrote: »
    I get by on the knowledge that I'm not going to spend a whole lot of time mucking about inside of my asshole anyway
  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Elitistb wrote:
    Why would you want to scan them like that? A duplicate of me wouldn't be me, regardless of what you did for it.

    Lets not go down this path, it would still be as much 'you' as you would be on leaving the clinic. There's really no definition or concept of 'you' that makes any sense at all, let alone one that compares a potentially brain damaged, dethawed head against an electronic copy put into a new body.

    Tastyfish on
  • Alfred J. KwakAlfred J. Kwak Registered User
    Tastyfish wrote:
    Elitistb wrote:
    Why would you want to scan them like that? A duplicate of me wouldn't be me, regardless of what you did for it.

    Lets not go down this path, it would still be as much 'you' as you would be on leaving the clinic. There's really no definition or concept of 'you' that makes any sense at all, let alone one that compares a potentially brain damaged, dethawed head against an electronic copy put into a new body.

    A copy is a copy and a clone is a clone, but it'll never be 'you' that occupies a new body. Science really need finds a way to transplant our brains and stop them from aging.

  • DrukDruk Registered User
    I'm with Elitistb on this one; I don't really care so much if my brain patterns survive, I want this specific brain to do so. It would be difficult to convince me to use a Star Trek transporter.

    I don't understand the concern about the rich freezing themselves and not contributing to the present; it is currently illegal to do so anyway -- you have to wait until you're "dead". Unless there is some country that has cryonics with laxer laws than I am aware of.

  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Tastyfish wrote:
    Elitistb wrote:
    Why would you want to scan them like that? A duplicate of me wouldn't be me, regardless of what you did for it.

    Lets not go down this path, it would still be as much 'you' as you would be on leaving the clinic. There's really no definition or concept of 'you' that makes any sense at all, let alone one that compares a potentially brain damaged, dethawed head against an electronic copy put into a new body.

    A copy is a copy and a clone is a clone, but it'll never be 'you' that occupies a new body. Science really need finds a way to transplant our brains and stop them from aging.

    It's not a copy any more than the one who walked in there is a copy, "you" don't exist as a static or constant thing anyway - you're constantly being copied and updated as it is. If you did it simultaneously, neither of you would know which of you it was who walked in - how is this different from just allowing 10 years to pass and then being a completely person made of entirely new atoms anyway? You are defining "you" almost in the same way as we trying to point to when the DNA of one species has evolved into another one. The new "you" has branched off from the old one, not been added alongside, as there is no definable difference between the two of you.

    I don't think there's anything that science can do without embracing this fact to stop brains aging, it's more than just mechanical failure (although if it was, would you be happy with a chip simulating neurons in your head, acting as more brain space, being implanted into a new brain - how much continuity is needed?).

    Course the solution to both would be to be a kind of Hive mind, resleeve and clone yourself before you die and include some shared space (or perhaps even just open the shared connection whilst you sleep). Then you can repeat this constantly, with it being impossible to tell where one person starts and the other ends, even after the original has died long ago. But now we're just in science fiction, but still one I'd like to read about and perhaps live in. I could live with being Tastyfish Prime.

    Tastyfish on
  • ArchArch Viruses are totally dependent on knowledge of every eternity. Renounce faith. Registered User regular
    Arch wrote:
    If I recall correctly, there is limited success with a suspended animation "gas" that essentially quickly replaces or ties up all the free oxygen in your body.

    If you know your cell biology, this will prohibit any metabolic action, of which apoptosis (programmed cell death) is one of.

    Everything halts, but nothing "dies", and if it is done in sterile conditions nothing decays. Right now the problems are getting rapid gas perfusion on large animals (works on mice, not on pigs).

    I think it is some hydroflouric gas? I can't remember.

    Anyway the point is that if I have control of myself until near the end of my life (assuming I don't snuff it in an accident) I would totally "suspend" myself if the tech has progressed far enough and nothing else can grant something close to immortality.

    I think they use hydrogen sulfide for it.

    That's the one

  • UrcbubUrcbub Registered User
    I'd do it just to see how the future plays out regardless of how it functions in practice. as long as I have enough cognitive functions left to see what is going on and how society got to where it is I am all for it. My biggest pet peeve about dying is that I wont find out anything about the future.

    But I probably wont freeze myself when it comes down to it.

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    We're not doing the "Is a clone/teleported person/exact replica/whatever really YOU?" dance in here. It's off-topic and will derail the shit out of this thread.

    [While watching popcorn in the microwave]
    Maddie: "Look Riley, the bag's as big as your head now!"
    Riley: "Hahaha, yeah!"
    Maddie: "Look, now it's as big as your butt!"
    Riley: "Omigosh, it looks just like my butt!"
  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote:
    We're not doing the "Is a clone/teleported person/exact replica/whatever really YOU?" dance in here. It's off-topic and will derail the shit out of this thread.
    No discussion on alternative life-extension methods to freezing or we can assume that they are for the sake of future discussions?

    For instance, any kind of stasis would certainly open up long distance space travel and that could be an environment that would allow you to work off your debt and also to acclimatise to a future world. Uploaded humans wouldn't be the best people to send to start with, but would certainly make it easier to boost populations on a world that's been slightly colonised. If you can make it past the first few years and send a message back, then we can send the people who weren't ready for carving a new life out of the bare rock but are needed in a larger society without generations passing.

    How people would respond to waking up a new world I don't know. Favourable to start with once you've got over the shock, I'd guess, especially if you've been exposed to the full culture shock of a future city.

  • ForarForar #432 Already prepping for Toronto Fan Expo!Registered User regular
    The book Old Man's War deals with this issue to a degree.

    Spoilered because, at least initially, the system being unknown is a plot point in the book's opening chapters;
    Spoiler:

    Anyway, it removes some of the "is a clone me or just a copy of me" by sort of 'updating the hardware and moving over the software' take on things.

    Also, I really enjoyed those books.

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  • Zilla360Zilla360 Spaaaace! In Space.Registered User regular
    Yes, because I would love to see what a post-singularity society really looks like.

    But knowing my luck, I'd wake up to find something akin to 'Idiocracy'.

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