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Recommended Reading

Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver Registered User, ClubPA regular
edited January 2009 in Ancient Forum Knowledge
This thread serves a double purpose. It gives reccomendations to people looking for a good read and it allows some insight on what kind of books certain forumeres like to read. If you are writing a fantasy story you might be more inclined to take plot advice from a fan of Tolkien and Pratchet than from a fan of Shakespear and Cummings.

The idea here is one post to put in your reccomendations for reading. Preferably in a list format such as
Heading for list
[list][u]Book:[/u] by: Author McWriter
[u]Pamphlet[/u] by: Writer McAuthor[/list]

If you want to give a brief description of the books without spoiling anything, or give a brief reason why you chose a particular book, you may do so. But please, if you do, keep it a short list.


Please only one post and no discussion in this thread! We are trying to keep it small and uncluttered so it can be easily browsed.

If you want to talk about a book, make a thread to discuss it.

Yes, you can do that.

Munkus Beaver on
Steam name: munkus_beaver
Blizzard thing: munkus#1952
Nintendo ID (3DS thinger): munkusbeaver
Please give to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: http://www.ccfa.org/
Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but it dies in the process.
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Posts

  • bone daddybone daddy Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited June 2004
    PA Classics

    Tragedies of Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles (rec the Greene and Lattimore 3 volume set for availability and accesibility)

    Lloyd Alexander, "Prydain Chronicles" (The Book of Three, The Black Cauldron, The Castle of Llyr, Taran Wanderer, The High King)

    Arabian Nights

    Aristophanes, comedies

    Isaac Asimov, works

    Margaret Atwood, works

    Baghavad Gita

    The Bible

    Douglas Adams, works

    William Burroughs, works

    Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths

    Ray Bradbury, works

    Beowulf, (rec. translations Seamus Heaney)

    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

    Albert Camus, works

    Orson Scott Card, Ender series

    Arthur C Clarke, 2001: A Space Oddysey

    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

    Susan Cooper, "The Dark is Rising" (Over Sea, Under Stone; The Dark is Rising; Greenwitch; The Grey King; Silver on the Tree)

    Dante, Inferno/The Divine Comedy (rec Robert and Jean Hollander trans)

    Philip K. Dick, works

    Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, works

    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

    John Gardner, works

    Willaim Gibson, Neuromancer

    Goethe, works

    William Gerald Golding, Lord of the Flies

    Heinlein, juvenile works, Starship Troopers, Stranger in a Strange Land, The Number of the Beast, Time Enough for Love

    Joseph Heller, works

    Frank Herbert, works

    Hermann Hesse, works

    Homer, Iliad and Odyssey (rec Fagles' translations for accessibility, Fitzgerald's translations for poetry)

    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

    Henrik Ibsen, works

    James Joyce, works

    Franz Kafka, works

    Jack Kerouac, On the Road

    Milan Kundera, works (The Unbearable Lightness of Being)

    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

    Ursula K. LeGuin, "Earthsea" (A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, Tehanu)

    Madeleine L'Engle, "Time" (A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet)

    C.S. Lewis, The Chronicles of Narnia

    H. P. Lovecraft, works

    Marlowe, works

    Milton, Paradise Lost

    Vladimir Nabokov, works

    Larry Niven, The Ringworld series

    Flannery O'Connor, short stories

    George Orwell, 1984, Animal Farm, Down and Out in Paris and London

    Ovid, The Metamorphoses

    Chuck Palahniuk, Choke, Fight Club, Survivor, Diary

    Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Lila

    Terry Pratchett, Discworld series

    Thomas Pynchon, works

    Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead

    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

    Shakespeare, works

    Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

    Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

    Neal Stephenson, Snow Crash

    Robert Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    John Swift, works

    Koushun Takami, Battle Royale

    Hunter S. Thompson, works

    J.R.R. Tolkien, Hobbit/Lord of the Rings and Middle Earth stories

    Sun Tzu, The Art of War

    Leo Tolstoy, works

    Jules Verne, works

    Virgil, The Aeneid

    Kurt Vonnegut, works

    Elie Weisel, Night

    H.G. Wells, works

    T.H. White, "Once and Future King"

    Robert Anton Wilson, Illuminatus!

    Richard Wright, Native Son

    Rogue helicopter?
    Ecoterrorism is actually the single largest terrorist threat at the moment. They don't usually kill people, but they blow up or set on fire very expensive things.
  • bone daddybone daddy Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited July 2004
    Science fiction/fantasy:
      The Ringworld series, by Larry Niven
      Armor, Vampire$, by John Steakly
      Mars trilogy, by Kim Stanley Robinson
      Mars Crossing, by Geoffrey A. Landis
      Northworld series, by David Drake
      Hammer's Slammers series, by David Drake

    Classics:
      Egil's Saga
      The Satires of Juvenal
      Poetry of Catullus
      Poetry of Martial
      Ammianus Marcellinus
      Homeric Hymns
      Hesiod's works
      Xenophon
      Histories of Tacitus
      Procopius' Secret History
      Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars (Graves translation)

    Rogue helicopter?
    Ecoterrorism is actually the single largest terrorist threat at the moment. They don't usually kill people, but they blow up or set on fire very expensive things.
  • ServoServo Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited July 2004
    Modern Lit-

    A Confederacy of Dunces
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Trainspotting
    Sewer, Gas, and Electric


    Travel-

    In a Sunburned Land

    Non-Fiction/Biography-

    Long Walk To Freedom
    Join Me!
    Consilience
    Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail '76
    Veil- The Secret Wars of the CIA 1981-1987

    newsigs.jpg
  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2004
      Anything by John Grisham
      Anything by Dan Brown, particularly
    The Davinci Code
    Dark Force Rising by:
    Mythology

    Steam name: munkus_beaver
    Blizzard thing: munkus#1952
    Nintendo ID (3DS thinger): munkusbeaver
    Please give to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: http://www.ccfa.org/
    Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but it dies in the process.
  • Dely AppleDely Apple Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Non-Fictions
    Travel: McCarthys Bar by Pete McCarthy
    Football: Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby
    Human Behavior: The Naked Ape by Desmond Morris
    Boogers: Anything by Dave Barry, really


    Fictions
    The works of Harlan Ellison (Love Ain't Nothin' But Sex Misspelled, etc.)
    Neil Gaiman's books (American Gods, etc.)
    Old Green Lantern comics :)

    (I know I have more than that, oh well another date to be edited in)

    feets.jpg
  • Dyrwen66Dyrwen66 Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Fiction
    Trainspotting by: Irvine Welsh
    Choke, Fight Club, Survivor, Invisible Monsters by: Chuck Palahniuk
    Martin Eden by: Jack London
    Non-Fiction
    Hegemony or Survival: America's Quest for Global Dominance by: Noam Chomsky
    What is Anarchism? by: Alexander Berkman

    <I'll probably edit once I finish more, but I read too many at once>

    "Famished dogs follow slowly as my own paws drag me to a dock, / to the last plank where I struggle to deny myself the path that every Pisces craves, /
    ... and I cough for every crater that I could see, / on the surface of that coffin we've come to call the moon." Circle Takes the Square
  • SlartiSlarti Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    The Dark Tower books by Steven King

  • StoverStover Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Focault's Pendulem, by Umberto Eco.

    However, only read this book if you: like history, like semi-confusing plot lines, and like hard reads.

    outoftheloop.jpg
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    A Game of Thrones by: George R. R. Martin
    A Clash of Kings by: George R. R. Martin
    A Storm of Swords by: George R. R. Martin

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  • edited February 2012
    .

    Crandle on
    emot-kittyjig.gifemot-kittyjig.gifemot-kittyjig.gif
  • Dex DynamoDex Dynamo Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Graphic Novels

    Watchmen, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore
    Preacher by Garth Ennis
    Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller

  • DynagripDynagrip destroy everything you touch Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2004
    Crime Noir Type stuff
    American Tabloid and Cold Six Thousand by James Ellroy.

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  • HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    This is a good way of reading older works for free.

    http://promo.net/pg/

    Anything older than 100 years will be there, as the site covers all public domain works.


    Also, Wikipedia is developing their own version of a public domain library.

  • meddleRPImeddleRPI Registered User, ClubPA
    edited July 2004
    The Modern Library Top 100:

    http://s90802637.onlinehome.us/old/top100.php

    Oh yeah, and

    Forrest Gump

    much better than the movie.

    Watership Down

    JohnThrice wrote:
    Rans wrote:
    i really wish you'd just kill yourself meddle
    Meddle, you asshole. You made me agree with Rans.
  • Vanilla CokeVanilla Coke Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown

  • Aunt JemimaAunt Jemima Registered User
    edited July 2004
    The Long Walk - Stephen King

    GabeJemima.gifRCR_Jemima.gif
  • PokerPoker Registered User, ClubPA
    edited July 2004
    General Literature
      Most anything Tom Clancy himself wrote. Including:
    The Hunt for Red October
    Rainbow Six
    The Bear and the Dragon

  • Baron DirigibleBaron Dirigible Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Titles which haven't been mentioned yet:
    On the Road by Jack Kerouac
    Hard-Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World by Haruki Murakami
    The Fat Man in History by Peter Carey
    The Godfather by Mario Puzo

    Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
  • FeintFeint Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Gregory Rabassa (very powerful semi-surrealism)

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  • Johnny 5Johnny 5 Registered User
    edited July 2004
    A few that I can think of right now that I don't think have been mentioned:

    A Short History of Nearly Anything by Bill Bryson
    Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem
    Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins

    Actually, any of the books I've read by those authors have been wonderful.

  • sinnsinn Registered User
    edited July 2004
    My Recommendations:
    The Number of the Beast by: Robert A. Heinlein
    Time Enough for Love by: Robert A. Heinlein
    Shogun by: James Clavell
    The Bourne Identity by: Robert Ludlum
    The Bourne Ultimatum by: Robert Ludlum
    The Bourne Supremacy by: Robert Ludlum
    The Stand by: Stephen King
    Voyager by: Diana Gabaldon
    The Incarnations of Immortality Series by: Piers Anthony
    The Xanth Series by: Piers Anthony
    The Adept Series by: Piers Anthony
    The Foundation Series by: Isaac Asimov
    The Pellucidar Series by: Edgar R. Burroughs
    The Mars Series by: Edgar R. Burroughs

    He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.
  • 150cc150cc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2004
    All should read Flannery O'Connor's short stories. This is the epitome of character development.

    Garrison Keillor's works are also highly recommended. Nobody sets a scene and sets a mood like Keillor.


    Complete Short Stories by Flannery O'Connor

    Utter brilliance. 10-20 pages of perfection in each short story... and each introduce some of the most compelling characters I have ever read, only to jerk the rug out from under you by the time the tale is over and leave you in shock and awe. O'Connor is brilliant. Everyone should read her works. Amazing stuff.

    lol internet
    what is up doggies
    it is so good to post
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited July 2004
    James Ellroy, "My Dark Places"

  • PantsmonkeyPantsmonkey Registered User
    edited July 2004
    These books are probably suited for the younger set. (If you read you could smash the first 2 in a few hours)

    Space Demons by Gillian Rubinstein
    The Rats oF Nimh by Robert C. O'Brien.
    1984 by George Orwell

    4ob39
  • hiandlohiandlo Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Life of Pi - Yann Martel
    The Princess Bride - S. Morgenstern (get the abridged version by William Goldman :D)

    Am I supposed to tell you if I have genital warts? Is that part of the rules?
  • boddahboddah Registered User, ClubPA
    edited July 2004
    150cc wrote:
    All should read Flannery O'Connor's short stories. This is the epitome of character development.

    AN EXCELLENT BOOK BY THIS AUTHOR IS ENTITLED "WISE BLOOD."

    IT IS ONE OF MY FAVORITES.

  • BobCescaBobCesca Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    I know technically they're kids books but Philip Pullman's 'His Dark Materials' trilogy is really quite good.

  • SirHephSirHeph Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Fantasy/Sci-Fi-

    The Dragonsbane series (Dragonsbane, Dragonshadow, Knight of the Demon Queen, Dragonstar)- Barbara Hambly

    The Dragons of Pern series (Too many to list)- Anne McCaffrey (surprised this one hasn't been named yet!)

    The Sholan Alliance series- Lisanne Norman (excellent romantic sci-fi, lots of politics and intrigue, but occasionally difficult reading)

  • KnucksKnucks Registered User
    edited July 2004
    I really like fantasy written for children and young adults. Some of these have been mentioned already, but I thought I would put all my favourites into one list:
    Phillip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy, including:

    The Golden Compass
    The Subtle Knife
    The Amber Spyglass

    John Bellair's "Lewis Barnavelt" trilogy, including:

    The House with a Clock in Its Walls
    The Figure in the Shadows
    The Letter, the Witch, and the Ring


    I'm sure I don't have to mention J.K. Rowling or J.R.R. Tolkien.

    Right now, I'm reading
    Garth Nix's "Abhorsen" trilogy, including:
    Sabriel
    Lirael
    Abhorsen
    I've finished Sabriel and I'm about to start Lirael. So far, so good.

    Suggestions of more books along these lines would be welcomed.
    PM me with your favourites, or any comments on this list.

    Current mood: Depressed
  • RohaqRohaq Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Greed - Chris Ryan
    (If you like that sort of thing)

    Spoiler:
  • Ranger RickRanger Rick Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    wheel of time series by robert jordan

    Libraries should have the first few in circulation.

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  • ShurakaiShurakai Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Tad Willams = god.

    I reccomend

    Tailchasers Song: A very well done tale about the lives of intelligent felines, faced with oppression in their world.

    Memory, Sorry, and Thorn : A three/four part tale (it depends on how you look at it) of a young boy named Sam. A classical Mideval romp throgh lands of Magic and Dragons, with some very unique twists.

    Otherland: My personal favorite books of all time. This series of Four volumes takes you to places you have never before concieved, through characters that you will come to love. This is a real brain buzzer, so if you have a very active imagination, get ready for a breathtaking experience, that will leave you hungry for more. Its sort of a cross between Science fiction and fantasy, because the means of what you experience has to do with realistic technology, but the substance of what you experience is wholly fantastical, in more ways then one.

  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited July 2004
    Knucks wrote:
    Right now, I'm reading
    Garth Nix's "Abhorsen" trilogy, including:
    Sabriel
    Lirael
    Abhorsen
    I've finished Sabriel and I'm about to start Lirael. So far, so good.

    I have 20 pages left of Abhorsen left to read i can highly recomend all three books and have red one a day. But i just had to go to bed last night so will finish it to day. His dark materials is well worth a read too.

    Futuramer

    Pattern Recognition - William Gibson

    Fact

    Colossus: the Rise and Fall of the American Empire - Niall Ferguson

  • inthegrayinthegray Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    Great Stuff for Short Story/Essay Writers

    Open Secrets - Alice Munro
    Dumped - Various
    Jenny & the Jaws of Life - Jincy Willett
    Naked - David Sedaris

  • theDottheDot Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Sphere and Andromeda Strain - Micheal Crichton for lessons in various fields of science, besides being great stories.

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  • SniperGuySniperGuy Also known as Dohaeris Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2004
    The Dark Tower series-Stephen King
    Carrie, The Stand -Stephen King
    Ghost Soldiers-Hampton Sides (Great WW2 Concentration camp liberation historical book)

    3DS: 2509-1593-4994
    Steam Profile
    PSN ID: Dohaeris210
    Treadmill Desk Twitch Stream : status.php?streamuser=SniperGuy210
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited July 2004
    as we are sharing our reccomendations, i'll try not to repeat anything that has been posted:

    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand (good for those with philosophy in their heads, and people who like to understand other people and how they work)

    The Prophet by Khalil Gibran (quite a nice bit of wisdom packed into the poetry)

    The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody by Will Cuppy is an awesomely hilarious history book about some pretty famous people.

    the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling is well done (though simple, it is a children's series) but is certainly an example of Hero and Villain and character development for those who intend to write sequels.

  • RazielRaziel Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Some books near and dear to my heart:

    R. A. Salvatore's Icewind Dale trilogy (The Crystal Shard, Streams of Silver, and The Halfling's Gem) is a fantastic fantasy read.

    David Eddings' Belgariad, Malloreon, Elenium, and Tamuli series were constant bedside reading material during my formative years.

    For a little Canadian literature, try out:

    Green Grass, Running Water by Thomas King
    The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler

    Toni Morrison's Beloved is bizarre and thought provoking.

    Joseph Mitchell's Joe Gould's Secret was also fantastic.

    Monkey by Wu Ch'eng-en.
    Jonathan Lethem's Gun, with Occasional Music and The Fortress of Solitude are also superb books.

    That list ran a little longer than I thought, but they're all titles that have become near and dear to me.

    Read the mad blog-rantings of a manic hack writer here.

    Thank you, Rubacava!
  • CrionCrion Registered User
    edited July 2004
    Most Dean Koontz is crap, but Fear Nothing and Seize the Night are extremely good, in my opinion.

    Mreh.
  • astrobstrdastrobstrd Registered User regular
    edited July 2004
    House of Leaves: by Mark Danielewski. Dense, erudite, a-maze-ing, and scary as hell on about 13 different levels. At it's most basic, a story about the need to tell stories.

    The Name of the Rose
    Travels Through Hyper-reality: both by Umberto Eco

    The first is probably his most popular work. It is amazing as a detective story and Eco REALLY knows his history. The second is a collection of essays. The titular one, concerning America's need to have things that are more real than real, is the best piece of short non-fiction I've ever read.

    White Noise
    Mao II: both by Don DeLillo

    Perhaps the greatest living American author. Mao II is so good and so expertly crafted, that I got a headache reading it and seriously questioned my desire to ever write again, because I knew that I could never create anything that good. The guy knows America and what it means to be an American in the modern world, perhaps better than anyone.

    The Complete Harlan Ellison: by Harlan Ellison

    Great, great sci-fi (but if you ever meet him, it's "speculative fiction", trust me on this). "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" is one of the most reprinted short stories in the world. Find out why.

    The Books of Blood
    The Great and Secret Show: both by Clive Barker

    I like Stephen King. I like his short stories. I like the Dark Tower series. Barkers short story collection of the truly terrible (in a good way) and his modern fantasy epic put both to shame. "Dread", "In the Hills, the Cities", "Jaqueline Ess, Her Will and Testament", and "The Yattering and Jack." are highlights of the BoB.

    Jin Merkle, Changeling Assassin. A Touch of Madness. AC 25 F 18 R 23 W 24.

    Jaren Cannier, Mul Warden. Freedom. AC 18 F14 R14 W14.
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