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Wood working, metal working, ceramics/pottery, etc.

CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
edited September 2013 in Artist's Corner
So I haven't seen a thread dedicated to things like wood working and metal working so I thought I would start one. Recently I've been learning things like welding and air brushing and I thought I would put these things to good use making some tables and other things that are hopefully artistic as well as functional. I hope some other people around here love doing this sort of stuff as much as I do.

So here is a dump of things I've done over the past 3 months:

End table made of beetle kill and welded 1" steel square tubing.
endtable.jpg

End tables:
_MG_6367.jpg
_MG_6372.jpg

Coffee Bar cover welded steel:
coffeebar-1.jpg
coffeebarclose.jpg

My first coffee table. 2" steel square tubing and steel sheet for the top.
coffeetable3.jpg

My double sided coffee table. 2" steel square tubing with a rust patina on one side and airbrushed solvent dyes on the other:
coffeetable.jpg
coffeetable2.jpg

Acrylic air brushed on galvanized steel:
acrylic1and2.jpg
Acrylic4.jpg
Acrylic3.jpg

Solvent Dye air brushed on galvanized steel.
solvent1.jpg
solvent1c.jpg

ColoredMetal.jpg

solvent3.jpg
solvent3c.jpg

solvent2.jpg

CommunistCow on
No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
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Posts

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    ok gonna ask a stupid question - I don't really know anything about any metalwork that doesn't involve an arc-welder. If I wanted to start constructing small-scale bespoke components/chassis for my own microbots, what would you recommend, equipment-wise?

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    I haven't done any small scale welding but IIRC my welding instructor said you would do that fine sort of work with TIG welding, which is a type of arc welding. I've done TIG welding on aluminum and it certainly takes a lot more patience and practice to get right.

    I think it would be ridiculously hard to do work on small things with oxy-acetylene.
    Edit: I'm wrong apparently you can gas weld small things. See my post below.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Oh, I've done tig-welding actually. Yeah I guess that would work.
    With what I currently own, my other options would probably involve copper and solder (I really do mean micro-scale, like, a few centimetres, so maybe that would be strong enough?).

  • LyricalLyrical Registered User regular
    Depending on the materials your using, you could look at jewelry-making/soldering/brazing techniques--generally less demanding equipment-wise than welding, and more suited to small details. You basically need a small jeweler's torch and some soldering material.

    Copper is easy to cut/shape with hand tools, and can be joined easily with silver solder. The techniques for brass and aluminum are out of my experience, but I think the materials are similar.

  • LyricalLyrical Registered User regular
    Also, the pine on that first end table is gorgeous, that piece is definitely my favorite. I would buy that.

  • AnialosAnialos RPG MPD patient #1 Registered User regular
    I'd buy most of those things. Where are you located? When I get back home in about 9 months or so I'll need to furnish a home with awesome things.

    Dichotomy wrote: »
    I play a lot of video games but I wouldn't call myself a "gamer" because "gamer" has become a pretty fucking disgusting label

    like "skinhead" or "republican"
  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    Woah CC, that's some rad stuff!

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    @tynic: I talked to a guy I know who welds a LOT and he says you can definitely do really tiny stuff with an oxy-acetylene and a small tip. However, what Lyrical recommended might be a better route.

    @Anialos: I'm located in Denver. I have absolutely no idea what shipping would cost for this kind of stuff.

    I've been contemplating making stuff specifically for sale and maybe selling it on places like etsy. If anyone happens to have any advice on trying to sell stuff like this please let me know. Also I guess if any of you are really interested in buying stuff, PM me and I might be able to make stuff for you. Personally I'd rather make/sell stuff for people on the forums than some random people.

    I just finished my kitchen table that is made out of beetle kill and aromatic cedar with welded 1" square tube legs. I'll post a picture of that sometime soon once the sealant dries.

    Edit: Does anyone have any critiques or observations about the acrylic and solvent dye airbrushing?

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    thanks for the advice, guys. I'll investigate further.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    Finally finished my beetle kill and aromatic cedar kitchen table with welded 1" square steel tubing frame.

    kitchentable-1.jpg

    leg.jpg

    legdetail.jpg

    tabletopdetail.jpg

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    fusionpuddleJackdawGin
  • squidbunnysquidbunny Registered User regular
    Holy crap that last one is gorgeous. I'd totally buy one of those but they're way too modern for my surrounds. :(

    banner200x40.jpg
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    Started my workshop membership back up. This isn't quite as exciting, but my wife wanted me to make a storage unit thing that her desk could stand on top of so it would raise the desk to bar stool height. She wanted it to look kind of old and distressed.

    Primer
    8s6bzh.jpg

    First layer of paint.
    kPrOmh.jpg

    Distressing
    DcwFth.jpg

    Finished
    oxwPEh.jpg

    In place
    OlNwYh.jpg

    Next we will need to spray paint the desk white.

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • AnialosAnialos RPG MPD patient #1 Registered User regular
    That looks neat! If my finances turn back around I'll be sending specs for that table we talked about long ago =p.

    Dichotomy wrote: »
    I play a lot of video games but I wouldn't call myself a "gamer" because "gamer" has become a pretty fucking disgusting label

    like "skinhead" or "republican"
  • MarsloMarslo Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    well nuts i found a thread just for me. im a welder/fabricator that went to art school.

    Heres my own little shop.

    602374_10151886897430481_1177308778_n.jpg

    I freelance here and their, but mostly on other peoples stuff.

    Here's some of the projects i worked on, nothing in this is of my design.

    18341_228530318110_1558472_n.jpg
    420591_10150560991248111_188548152_n.jpg
    199137_10150145578388111_2308504_n.jpg
    303437_10150666676488111_1913652505_n.jpg
    308848_306768322668877_43744238_n.jpg
    183414_204004472945263_4201173_n.jpg
    julie_02.jpg
    215972_214640535214990_6994048_n.jpg216308_214640555214988_2684231_n.jpg


    And heres what i do to pay the bills.
    Im one of the guys that builds them and welds about 25% of it.

    575493_10151886879865481_93626359_n.jpg


    In the past months iv been mostly doing bike frames. But i recently decided to take on a desk contract and kitchen counter top.

    Marslo on
    fusionpuddle
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Those are some pretty sweet things. That first picture of the stairs did you do the stairs and the wall behind it? I also really like the metal below the banister in the 4th image, but I'm guessing that isn't to code.

    I'm rather curious what is that thing you are welding for your "day job."

    You should un-spoiler all those images.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • MarsloMarslo Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    I build the stairs along with 2 other guys and i helped out on the wall. But im curently building a similar wall in my appartement out of old refinished broken down wooden pallets.

    What i build at my day job are called i think, tankers (citerne in french).

    2500-5-axles_lrg.jpg

    This is one of largest one iv build so far. Took about 3 weeks.

    2800-5-axles_lrg.jpg

    Marslo on
    Spoit
  • NappuccinoNappuccino Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    That is all pretty awesome stuff there! you should start up your own thread so everyone gets to see how sweet it is :)

    edit: also, I'm planning on building my own computer desk for my apartment... not sure if this is the best idea but as long as I don't have to cut up too much i'll enjoy doing it.

    Nappuccino on
    Like to write? Want to get e-published? Give us a look-see at http://wednesdaynightwrites.com/
    Spoiler:
  • MarsloMarslo Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Nappuccino wrote: »
    That is all pretty awesome stuff there! you should start up your own thread so everyone gets to see how sweet it is :)

    edit: also, I'm planning on building my own computer desk for my apartment... not sure if this is the best idea but as long as I don't have to cut up too much i'll enjoy doing it.

    Do you have a general idea how you want to go about it? If its your first time building something out of wood, I would highly recommend getting some advice. Building a table/desk out of wood is a bit more complex then just 4 legs and a flat surface.

    But if you know how to work a all that and im just being condescending, that's cool too.

    Either way, what kind of wood are you thinking of using ?

    Marslo on
  • FANTOMASFANTOMAS Fland SudAméricaRegistered User regular
    I dont have anything interesting to add. I just came here to say that this thread is awesome, and that most of the work compiled in it is VERY GOOD, while the rest of the work is simply excellent.

  • Emissary42Emissary42 Registered User regular
    Seconding FANTOMAS on the awesomeness of the projects you've got here. The airbrushed metal pieces actually remind me of something I saw earlier today with titanium anodizing and tape masks to finely control areas of color:
    http://www.nycresistor.com/2012/07/06/9-volt-battery-chain-anodizer/

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Newest addition to the family my next coffee table:

    PkIgk.jpg
    rough cut 1"x4"x8' beetle kill

    aWCT5.jpg
    Planar and jointered the wood.

    zy9kW.jpg
    routered all the edges and then used an oribtal sander with 100 grit and then down to 320 grit.

    Htj5j.jpg
    Sorry I forgot to take a ton of pictures during the frame process. I got 32' of 1" 16 gauge square tubing. Cut it into 4 pieces of 48", 4 pieces of ~31", 4 pieces of 11", and 2 pieces( the middle supports) of ~29".

    I used a drill press to put holes in the top parts of the frame so the wood could screw in.
    I used a horizontal bandsaw to cut the top and bottom frame pieces into sections with 45 degree angles. I then used a square to make sure they were at 90 degree angles and MIG welded the top and bottom frame. I then tack welded the 11" leg pieces to the bottom using a 90 degree angle magnet to make sure they stayed in place while welding. I then set the top part of the frame on, adjusted the legs a little bit since they were barely tack welded on and welded the legs completely to the top and bottom. I then added the two middle supports.

    Sealed with Sculpt Nouveau's Ever-clear 2 part urethane resin applied via brush. (Note if you use this stuff make sure to wear one of those full body disposable coveralls that covers the face, use a respirator, and eye protection)

    wDfxb.jpg
    I used 1 1/2" #8 screws through the frame into the wood. For reference the wood ended up being a little under 3/4" after planing and sanding. I used broken pieces of a paint mixing stick to space the wood properly.

    psWgH.jpg
    Finished product. Wood sealed with Vermont Natural Coatings - Polywhey Natural Furniture Finish.

    b3W28.jpg

    J74Eu.jpg

    GcDYI.jpg

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    fusionpuddle
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    What are you using to grind your welds/finish the metal? Is that an aesthetic choice or is it just the way you left it?

  • bombardierbombardier mr. mully Vancouver, BCModerator mod
    I like the build but the raw grinder marks from cleaning the welds I am not a fan of. I would say sand/beadblasting that might give the metal a really nice matte finish, but the logisticis of doing that on a large frame seem crazy to me.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Forbe! wrote: »
    What are you using to grind your welds/finish the metal? Is that an aesthetic choice or is it just the way you left it?

    Just your average 4 1/2" angle grinder with a 60 or 80 grit disc. I left them that was as an aesthetic choice. I've seen a few pieces of furniture sold in stores and boutiques that were finished like this. I contemplated trying to use some sort of black/grey patina + some light sanding to try and get it all looking uniform, but I decided against it in the end.

    Bombs: As you can see a few posts above, I did grind all the surfaces on the frame of the kitchen table I made. I did that all with the angle grinder before welding it together and then re-grinded parts after welding. It really does take quite a bit of work and I'm sure it would be a fuck-ton easier with a sand blaster. Maybe I'll get one of those some day.

    I'm still playing around with the aesthetics of the things I'm making and I'm not sure I want to make them all the same. Up next on the project list is a long narrow metal frame table with a concrete top. Still not sure how I plan on finishing the metal on that. I doubt it will be grinded and shiny like the kitchen table. I think that would clash too much with a grey concrete top. Then again I might throw some color into the concrete when I make it or maybe I'l do an acid stain.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • NappuccinoNappuccino Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Marslo wrote: »
    Nappuccino wrote: »
    That is all pretty awesome stuff there! you should start up your own thread so everyone gets to see how sweet it is :)

    edit: also, I'm planning on building my own computer desk for my apartment... not sure if this is the best idea but as long as I don't have to cut up too much i'll enjoy doing it.

    Do you have a general idea how you want to go about it? If its your first time building something out of wood, I would highly recommend getting some advice. Building a table/desk out of wood is a bit more complex then just 4 legs and a flat surface.

    But if you know how to work a all that and im just being condescending, that's cool too.

    Either way, what kind of wood are you thinking of using ?

    I've done some general wood working in the past, though usually just making shelving units for our garage. This would be the first time I make something that needs to actually be used by me on a day to day basis.

    Really, I just want to make something that is simple, but big enough for a monitor, keyboard, studio speakers and maybe have some writing space to one side and it seems like that should be cheaper to make than order from a store...

    (sorry for bringing this up again after like 2 weeks- I didn't know this thread had a reponse to it.)

    Nappuccino on
    Like to write? Want to get e-published? Give us a look-see at http://wednesdaynightwrites.com/
    Spoiler:
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    This may be me just being persnickety, but here is my opinion as someone who does this type of work for a living. If you're going to go through the work of using paper disks to sand down your welds, why not go the extra step with a scotchbright wheel or flap disk to blend the adjacent material? You've already spent more time than it would take to just grind the things off with a hard disk. Also, I can't make out your corners very well, but think about squaring those off a bit better, it will make everything look much nicer (take a look at the NOMMA standards for weld finishes for an idea of what I'm talking about).

    As Bombs mentioned, bead or shot blasting would help blend everything out nicely, though it would get rid of the mill scale, and require a protective finish afterwards. You can also use patinas, like you mentioned, with or without blasting, depending on what look you're going for, though I could write about 30 pages on the subject.

    Summarily, you have some nice work here, but you can really make it look better with a little bit more care in your choice of finishing.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    I'm still pretty new to this stuff so I don't expect my stuff to be up to the standards of people who do this for a living. It was an aesthetic choice and like I said I'm probably going to try something different next time.

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    Just offering some advice, if you ever have a question about something I'm around.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    @Forbe!
    Blerg, I've been so busy with the new house I forgot about responding to you.

    I was using a flap disk on an angle grinder to grind down the welds; I wasn't using paper disks. How would you blend the adjacent material? At least with my experience using the angle grinder there wasn't much variability. Either the greyish look from the mill scale is still there or it gets ground off and looks shiny. So I figure my options were to only grind the corners or I grind every surface of the metal. In my experience at least with the 60 grit flap disks grinding every surface is quite a bit more work. I don't think I will realistically be able to use a sand blaster on any future projects. Do you have any recommendations on a different tool or different type of abrasive to use with the angle grinder to make the work quicker?

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    Made a end table with wavy metal legs and a beetle kill top.

    TArQj.jpg

    Took some left over 1"x6" beetle kill boards and did some 1.5" rips on a table saw. I then used a miter saw to cut the pieces into random sizes. I then laid them out and tried to set pieces in such a way that I would get more contrast and avoid having blue pieces next to blue pieces and white next to white. I then used some wood glue and clamps and clamped this together. The clamping was done in two sections and then both sections were then glued and clamped together after they had separately dried.

    JHsXV.jpg
    After everything was dried I ran the piece through the table saw to cut off the long sides and then it was small enough that I cut off the short sides using the miter saw. I then used a table router to round out all the edges. After all that was done I used an orbital sander on the whole thing going from 50 grit to 120 to 220 to 320. After that I went over the edges a little better with some 400 grit hand sand paper.

    3a95p.jpg
    Sorry I don't have many process pictures of making the frame I was in a rush when I was making it. I took some scrap rectangular metal bars that were in about 6' sections and put them into a scroll bender and bent them. I actually didn't use the scroll bender as it was intended I just kind of used it to hold the piece and then just used the leverage to bend a small section then I would move it and bend the next section. This could probably done with a table clamp. After this I took the long lengths of the square bar and selected sections I liked and then used a metal chop saw to cut them to the appropriate size. I just used some left over 1/2" square tubing and round metal bars for the top of the frame. I used a drill press to put some holes in the square tubing so I could screw the top in there.

    Sorry for the wide angle picture it has distorted the perspective a little bit making the frame look different.

    p96i4.jpg
    Screwed the wood top to the frame.

    XgxmP.jpg
    I sealed the top before putting on the frame with 3 coats of tung oil based sealant. Even though it was probably unnecessary I did use a damp cloth to raise the grain and then sanded that down with some 400 grit.

    3sSho.jpg

    b6LB0.jpg

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    fusionpuddle
  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
  • HuxleyHuxley Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    I've always wanted to try woodworking, and spending a couple of weekends this summer hanging crown moulding in the kitchen just got me more excited. So my wife gave me the go-ahead to borrow some tools from family and try this woodworking stuff out. To try and learn by doing. We've got a couple of projects lined up (easy ones, I hope) and I'm super excited.

    Questions:

    I've found a couple of sites that have a ton of beginner tips and projects, the best I've found so far being ana-white.com/. Most of her stuff is just simple straight lines and beginner joints. Do any of the more experienced woodworkers here have other sites or resources to recommend?

    A lot of "do-it-yourself" sites use a Kreg Jig, and it looks pretty idiot proof. Anyone used one?

    My first project is a console table from West Elm my wife fell in love with. I'm pretty sure it's just 4x4s five deep with a "repurposed" finish. I only see six cuts and two joints on it, so I'm hoping it comes together pretty easily.

    Second project is a headboard, which seems like it could be as straightforward as I needed it to be.

    EXCITED!

    Huxley on
  • HuxleyHuxley Registered User regular
    On closer inspection, that console is more than 6 cuts, as the boards aren't solid blocks, but rather the front is two 3x1s just stained together and attached (and puttied?) to look like a 3x3. Though the legs do look solid, so I'm not sure.

    I'm also not sure where you get 3x3, but it sure ain't Home Depot.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    I'm still not great at wood working and I certainly know nothing about joints since most of my pieces of metal frames/legs. Ana-white's website is somewhat useful and you can easily build something from her plans. I'm guessing that West Elm table wouldn't be too hard to make. I hear that http://www.reddit.com/r/woodworking is also a good place to learn and ask questions. If you can't figure out that join I'm sure someone there would be able to tell you how it is done.

    P.S. $430 is stupid expensive for that simple piece of furniture. :o

    Edit: Where are you getting the 3"x3" measurement? If you really want some pieces that size you could get a 4"x4" and cut it down some with a table saw and then if you have access to one you might be able to fine tune that with a planer.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • HuxleyHuxley Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    I'm basing 3x3 off their description. They call it ~15" deep and it's five boards wide. It looks like solid 3x3 squares up and over. Trying to do this in a cost-effective way, I guess I can either build it out of the nice wood and rip 6x1s. If I want to go solid, carving up 4x4s might work, though it's going to be treated wood, which I'm not sure if that's OK for indoors. Isn't treated wood poisonous or something?

    E: I guess I could also glue-up two 2x4s and shrink them down. Hmm.

    Huxley on
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    Huxley wrote: »
    I'm basing 3x3 off their description. They call it ~15" deep and it's five boards wide. It looks like solid 3x3 squares up and over. Trying to do this in a cost-effective way, I guess I can either build it out of the nice wood and rip 6x1s. If I want to go solid, carving up 4x4s might work, though it's going to be treated wood, which I'm not sure if that's OK for indoors. Isn't treated wood poisonous or something?

    E: I guess I could also glue-up two 2x4s and shrink them down. Hmm.

    You can find heat/pressure treated 4x4s at Home Depot which are OK for indoor use. Just don't get any chemical treated wood for indoor use.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Finally finished making my concrete and welded steel frame entryway table:

    Mf4j4.jpg

    qXi9e.jpg

    4Ff1n.jpg

    Description and other pictures here.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    fusionpuddle
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    That Table is a bit more conservative than your other projects, design wise, and I'm a huge fan of The simplicity.

    I really, Really want to learn to do this kinda stuff, I should have tried it more while at school.

    lma_iphone_icon.pngAA_iphone_icon.pngtwittersolid.pngtumbrsolid.png
  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    I very seriously considered embedding some gears into the concrete, but for the life of me I couldn't find any place to buy non-bicycle gears. People kept suggesting I go pull apart a transmission from a junkyard, but I really didn't want to put in THAT much effort.

    You can still learn. I've heard that some community colleges have welding or metal working courses.

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • SkutSkutSkutSkut Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Here's the maille I've done been wanting to show it off, pics in the spoilers and here's a link to the imgur album.
    Spoiler:

    SkutSkut on
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