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Star Trek is Our Business

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Posts

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Capfalcon wrote: »
    Scientist: To die in an honorable lab explosion, or to die of radiation poison from honorium.

    Chef: To die during Taargh butchering.

    Politician: To die on a diplomatic mission, causing an incident that provides an excuse for the empire to go to war.

    Doctor: To have the most people die honorably under you.

    Fat Klingon Prostitute: To have the most people die honorably under you.

  • RenaissanceDanRenaissanceDan Registered User
    edited March 2012
    Capfalcon wrote: »
    Scientist: To die in an honorable lab explosion, or to die of radiation poison from honorium.

    Chef: To die during Taargh butchering.

    Politician: To die on a diplomatic mission, causing an incident that provides an excuse for the empire to go to war.

    Doctor: To have the most people die honorably under you.

    Prostitute: See Doctor.

    Edit: shryke beat me to it!

    RenaissanceDan on
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"

  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Registered User regular
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    The same reason people don't routinely use Emergency Exits or Cargo Bay Doors to enter and exit buildings? In Star Trek, there is a limited amount of information buffer that can be used for transporting at any given time (yes, that's ridiculous, we know), and it would kinda suck if someone needed an emergency medical transport and someone else was using the transporter to go up a single deck to a holodeck for his Space Porn. I also imagine that there are shielded areas throughout the ship that prevent routine transporting (like Engineering), for the same reason you would shield them against outside attack.

    Steam ID: Hahnsoo, Steam Name currently: Hahnsopolis | PSN: Hahnsoo | Monster Hunter Tri: Hahnsoo, E8HJCA
  • PantsBPantsB Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    The same reason people don't routinely use Emergency Exits or Cargo Bay Doors to enter and exit buildings? In Star Trek, there is a limited amount of information buffer that can be used for transporting at any given time (yes, that's ridiculous, we know), and it would kinda suck if someone needed an emergency medical transport and someone else was using the transporter to go up a single deck to a holodeck for his Space Porn. I also imagine that there are shielded areas throughout the ship that prevent routine transporting (like Engineering), for the same reason you would shield them against outside attack.

    I'd also think its not a very efficient use of energy.

    I do wonder why transporters aren't used in war more. Like
    "Oh shit 100 Klingons are attacking."
    *Transporter sounds*
    *100 Klingons collapse to the ground with a large air bubble in their brains"

    11793-1.png
    Spoiler:
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • ArchonexArchonex Registered User
    edited March 2012
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Archonex on
  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Pailryder wrote: »
    there was a tng episode with a klingon scientist, i think everyone was shocked.

    There was a Klingon scientist in Enterprise's Augment trilogy.

    Harry Dresden on
  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    The same reason people don't routinely use Emergency Exits or Cargo Bay Doors to enter and exit buildings? In Star Trek, there is a limited amount of information buffer that can be used for transporting at any given time (yes, that's ridiculous, we know), and it would kinda suck if someone needed an emergency medical transport and someone else was using the transporter to go up a single deck to a holodeck for his Space Porn. I also imagine that there are shielded areas throughout the ship that prevent routine transporting (like Engineering), for the same reason you would shield them against outside attack.

    Real world reason? Special effects cost money.

    "You. Poet. Be sure to write this down."
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    The same reason people don't routinely use Emergency Exits or Cargo Bay Doors to enter and exit buildings? In Star Trek, there is a limited amount of information buffer that can be used for transporting at any given time (yes, that's ridiculous, we know), and it would kinda suck if someone needed an emergency medical transport and someone else was using the transporter to go up a single deck to a holodeck for his Space Porn. I also imagine that there are shielded areas throughout the ship that prevent routine transporting (like Engineering), for the same reason you would shield them against outside attack.

    But they don't even use the transporters in the case of emergencies. Like in that first episode where we saw Reg Barkley, the ship was accelerating out of control and about to tear itself apart, and Barkley had a theory on what was causing it so he and LaForge had to go to the cargo bay to check something out... and still they walked there instead of beaming there. Not like they had time to spare in that case.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • dlinfinitidlinfiniti Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    "Transporters are terrifying" --Reg Barkley

    AAAAA!!! PLAAAYGUUU!!!!
  • ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning Registered User regular
    Pailryder wrote: »
    there was a tng episode with a klingon scientist, i think everyone was shocked.

    There was a Klingon scientist in Enterprise's Augment trilogy.

    One of the only good things Enterprise in terms of the larger universe was explain the Klingon obsession with honorable warriors. It used to be that any profession that took training and dedication could bring glory to those who pursued it, if they did it with honor (which for a doctor would I guess mean avoiding malpractice suits, lawyers from utilizing technicalities, and so on?). But then at some point it focused on warriors as being the most honorable path, and, welp...

  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    Reginald Barclay and the Starfleet scientist killed via transporter in The Motion Picture disagree.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    dlinfiniti wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    "Transporters are terrifying" --Reg Barkley
    Barclay was just prone to accidents.

  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    Am I the only one who doesn't like Barclay and was hoping he'd die or disappear?

    "You. Poet. Be sure to write this down."
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Turkson wrote: »
    Am I the only one who doesn't like Barclay and was hoping he'd die or disappear?

    Yes, you are.

    Barclay even made Voyager watchable. The episode "Projections", when he paces around Sickbay in a worry near-panic and then turns and tells the stone-faced Doctor "stay calm", is one of my favourite moments in that show.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • Caveman PawsCaveman Paws Registered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    I think the "That part of the ship is shielded" reason stops most transporter beams, especially near the engineering section.

  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose Registered User regular
    "Safe" or not, I know I wouldn't want to be transporting into one of the most heavily shielded bits of the ship, especially if the twin-beam particle accelerator known as the warp reactor was doing anything at all, muc less things it's not supposed to.

    ...because dragons are AWESOME! That's why.
    Nintendo Network ID: AzraelRose
    DropBox invite link - get 500MB extra free.
  • Boring7Boring7 Registered User regular
    I believe someone posted this a while back:

    http://www.whompcomic.com/comics/2011-08-01-The-Smartest-Klingon.jpg

    Thanatos wrote: »
    Goldman Sachs may as well be named COBRA.
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    Turkson wrote: »
    Am I the only one who doesn't like Barclay and was hoping he'd die or disappear?

    I was hoping tragedy found him at every turn.

  • zerg rushzerg rush Registered User regular
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

  • dlinfinitidlinfiniti Registered User regular
    Boring7 wrote: »

    that's pretty much worf's son right there

    AAAAA!!! PLAAAYGUUU!!!!
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Turkson wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    The same reason people don't routinely use Emergency Exits or Cargo Bay Doors to enter and exit buildings? In Star Trek, there is a limited amount of information buffer that can be used for transporting at any given time (yes, that's ridiculous, we know), and it would kinda suck if someone needed an emergency medical transport and someone else was using the transporter to go up a single deck to a holodeck for his Space Porn. I also imagine that there are shielded areas throughout the ship that prevent routine transporting (like Engineering), for the same reason you would shield them against outside attack.

    Real world reason? Special effects cost money.

    Transporters themselves only exist because of the FX budget and time constraints.

  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    Transporter accidents, though rare, do occur at a significant rate, and apparently OSHA exists in the future



    Also have you seen some of the people on the Enterprise? They're obviously having a hard enough time trying to get daily exercise

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    dlinfiniti wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    "Transporters are terrifying" --Reg Barkley

    "I want to live! I WANT TO LIVE!!! GAHHH!!!...." --Tuvix

    bar_zps02bac615.jpg
  • ArchonexArchonex Registered User
    edited March 2012
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.

    Now, take a space sword bat'leth. It's very simple to use. Beam the guy in a few steps away from the guy you want dead, and have the Klingon insert pointy end A into enemy B.

    This is all kind of pointless, though. Star Trek doesn't follow logic when it comes to ground combat. If they were smart, any engagement would end with "and then the ship nuked the site from orbit with a laser cannon". Or using the (rather miscalculated) power of a phaser to detonate a mountain.

    Pretty sure the phaser thing is one of those things that was retconned as being a character bullshitting someone/not being accurate later on too, since we never saw Sisko, Picard, or Janeway rampaging around, blowing apart entire colonies, even though there were times that they could.

    Archonex on
  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.

    if that was the case i'd be carrying around six of those things like Blackbeard.

    bar_zps02bac615.jpg
  • dlinfinitidlinfiniti Registered User regular
    DanHibiki wrote: »
    dlinfiniti wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Question; Why aren't transporters used more often as primary transportation means within a ship. Sure, I understand there should be backup system in place cause stuff happens, but every time I see geordi using a turbo lift I'm like "Just transport up there dude"
    Considering how often the stupid, low-tech stuff on the ship broke down, ask yourself if you would want to risk that happening while your molecules are in transit because you where too rushed to wait for an elevator to the bridge.

    "Transporters really are the safest way to travel." -- Geordi LaForge, in an episode of TNG.

    "Transporters are terrifying" --Reg Barkley

    "I want to live! I WANT TO LIVE!!! GAHHH!!!...." --Tuvix

    bahaahahahaha
    let this haunt your dreams some more
    8674244_35715c171204273576_m.jpg

    AAAAA!!! PLAAAYGUUU!!!!
  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    DanHibiki wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.

    if that was the case i'd be carrying around six of those things like Blackbeard.

    Y'know, I just now realized that Klingon disruptors could almost pass for pirate flintlock pistols...

    "You. Poet. Be sure to write this down."
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    Quark:"War. What is it good for? If you ask me, absolutely nothing."

    steam_sig.png
  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    I am going to have to watch that first Star Trek movie again some time. I barley remember any of it. I was four when it came out. All of the original series was pre-Krathoon.

    Krathoon on
  • Boring7Boring7 Registered User regular
    Krathoon wrote: »
    I am going to have to watch that first Star Trek movie again some time. I barley remember any of it. I was four when it came out. All of the original series was pre-Krathoon.

    It always made me feel like I felt when watching the extended Dune or Space Odyssey; long and slow.

    Not that this was a bad thing, it set a certain atmosphere of the big emptiness of space.

    Thanatos wrote: »
    Goldman Sachs may as well be named COBRA.
  • DredZedDredZed Registered User regular
    Boring7 wrote: »
    Krathoon wrote: »
    I am going to have to watch that first Star Trek movie again some time. I barley remember any of it. I was four when it came out. All of the original series was pre-Krathoon.

    It always made me feel like I felt when watching the extended Dune or Space Odyssey; long and slow.

    Not that this was a bad thing, it set a certain atmosphere of the big emptiness of space.

    The Director's Cut they released on DVD is a bit better, though still drags quite a lot at many points.

    Looks really pretty though.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • RenaissanceDanRenaissanceDan Registered User
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Turkson wrote: »
    Am I the only one who doesn't like Barclay and was hoping he'd die or disappear?

    I was hoping tragedy found him at every turn.

    Your hopes were rewarded.

    As children, did anyone else play pretend that they were on the holodeck? Looking back, I think it was weird that I did what amounted to pretending I was in a place that made pretend things. I was pretending I could pretend in the FUTURE. So meta.

  • Caveman PawsCaveman Paws Registered User regular
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Turkson wrote: »
    Am I the only one who doesn't like Barclay and was hoping he'd die or disappear?

    I was hoping tragedy found him at every turn.

    Your hopes were rewarded.

    As children, did anyone else play pretend that they were on the holodeck? Looking back, I think it was weird that I did what amounted to pretending I was in a place that made pretend things. I was pretending I could pretend in the FUTURE. So meta.

    I think I pretended to be in the Danger Room from X-men. Same thang.

  • Pi-r8Pi-r8 Registered User regular
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.
    That segment was stupid because we never, ever see a phaser malfunction or see anyone use it on anything other than its default setting. It only makes sense as a metaphor for the M16 vs. the AK47.

  • nightmarennynightmarenny Registered User regular
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.
    That segment was stupid because we never, ever see a phaser malfunction or see anyone use it on anything other than its default setting. It only makes sense as a metaphor for the M16 vs. the AK47.

    How often do we see guns malfunction in movies?

    Quire.jpg
  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.
    That segment was stupid because we never, ever see a phaser malfunction or see anyone use it on anything other than its default setting. It only makes sense as a metaphor for the M16 vs. the AK47.

    Frankly I'd rather have a modern assault rifle over any energy weapon from Star Trek. Point at enemy, watch as the energy beam misses, hold the fire button down for 3 seconds...

    -OR-

    Shoot a lot of bullets in the same 3 seconds.

    "You. Poet. Be sure to write this down."
  • ArchonexArchonex Registered User
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    zerg rush wrote: »
    Archonex wrote: »
    emp123 wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Pentaghost wrote: »
    I agree with the tactical advantage thing, it just seems like the Klingons would be the last race in the entire Alpha Quadrant to use them.

    They'd be the last to develop them, sure. But then, they just ransomed them from the Romulans.

    They'd certainly use them though. They aren't stupid in space combat.

    Ground combat, on the other hand...

    Sometimes the guy who brings the knife to a gun fight wins, because clearly that dude is fucking crazy.

    Usually it's either the guy with the gun is incredibly incompetent with the weapon or the knife guy is a goddamn super-human entity that is immune to physics (like Val Armorr). That's why it's difficult for me to take close combat knife fighting Klingons against opponents with phasers seriously, excluding Red Shirts those people are to stupid to live.

    Being crazy only works if you can back it up. Otherwise they're easy pickings against competent opponents.

    Klingons apparently have backup clavicles. I don't even know how that works, except that apparently they get broken during sex if DS9 is any indication.

    Pretty sure they're built from the ground up for fucking things up in close combat, and getting the Klingon there to do the job.


    Hell, TNG had Worf pull a Lazarus after they tore out/up his spine. Assuming Klingon medical technology was better, and their approach to using it was more reasonable, they'd be a really goddamn scary race to fight. You'd shoot one, and he'd probably be back up on his feet with a minigun for a hand a day later.

    You know there's some Klingon out there who'd want a minigun prosthesis for a hand, too. More dakka seems to be a slightly underlying concept in some of their captains.

    Phasers can blow up buildings. You can't bring back people from a pile of ashes.

    How often does that happen, though?

    The impression I got was that a phaser might be able to do that, but that it'd probably drain the charge on the thing.

    Kira has a nice segment in DS9 explaining why a phaser isn't really the best weapon. It's got a ton of features and a very high max power setting compared to some other setting guns, but that means one of them is more prone to breaking or malfunctioning. Also, it means the shots take more of a charge and it's much more complicated to use.
    That segment was stupid because we never, ever see a phaser malfunction or see anyone use it on anything other than its default setting. It only makes sense as a metaphor for the M16 vs. the AK47.

    We also never see them detonating mountains like some of the canon claims they can.

    The closest we ever got to a situation where the Federation was fighting "dirty" was the war episode in DS9, and it was kind of implied that a good deal of the tech they were using was starting to break down from wear and tear.

This discussion has been closed.