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Can A Tenant Refuse Entry to Landlord for Renovations?

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Posts

  • templewulftemplewulf Registered User regular
    EggyToast wrote:
    Even if you can't get out of the lease in full, you may be able to work out the last month, or something to that effect.

    On the downside, that work CAN happen relatively quickly; if you were living there, you could leave in the morning and home home to new countertops and sinks and vanity. The carpets would take more work but only because most people have things on top of the carpets. I think it's still worthwhile seeing if you can negotiate something, though, since not having a tenant even though there's a lease makes that type of work tons easier. You're providing a benefit by not occupying the space, in other words.

    That was exactly the angle I was trying to work, but they weren't amenable to it when I brought it up. I'll try again this weekend, since there should be a different leasing manager there.

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  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Have they even said that they're going to start renovating your unit before your lease is up? Because it looks like your position is based on the assumption that they will be, and that it will be a huge imposition to you, simply because you want out early. One simple solution for them (if they don't want to let you out of the lease early) is to simply hold off on the renovations until your lease is up.

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  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    templewulf wrote:
    Okay, let me straighten something out, since there appears to be a good deal of misunderstanding of my intentions. I'm not looking to "bar the door", so to speak. I'm trying to figure out if I have the right to say "that's not going to work for us" in the case where the owner tries to assert a right to remodel. The assumption of an adversarial stance is bewildering.

    I did manage to find a tenants' association; I couldn't at first since the statewide ones apparently don't do anything for Minneapolis. The advocate said much of the same stuff as in this thread. The owner cannot be barred from entry if due notice is given, but they cannot engage in activity which makes the space unlivable. She specifically cited MN STAT 504B.161 Covenant of Habitability, which allows us to specifically request release from lease in cases where it becomes inhabitable.

    I'm not entirely sure what the renovations will entail, but it is at least replacement of kitchen countertops, cabinets, sinks, bathroom vanity, and I think carpets. I'm not sure how that last one would work, but all the renovated units I've seen have new carpets.

    you do have every right to stop people entering your residence to do renovations. he can't just enter the place whenever he wants

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  • templewulftemplewulf Registered User regular
    Druhim wrote:
    Have they even said that they're going to start renovating your unit before your lease is up? Because it looks like your position is based on the assumption that they will be, and that it will be a huge imposition to you, simply because you want out early. One simple solution for them (if they don't want to let you out of the lease early) is to simply hold off on the renovations until your lease is up.

    Yeah, apparently it's a thing with these guys. A few neighbors complained about it.

    They're, more or less, not co-operating on the breaking fee, so I'm just going to keep the place and pay for both for the next four months. It's a big bummer, but at least we can move out at our own pace.

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  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    I would suggest at least talking to a lawyer before you give up. Especially if you can find one that is free to talk to. For example if you are a student, most universities have a housing lawyer that you can talk to for free. At any rate, there are usually a massive amount of things that can be a breach of contract on the owners part, and can get you out without paying the broken lease fee. If you can get a free consult it is definitely worth trying.

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