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[FILM] School Generation

WashWash Registered User regular
edited December 2011 in Debate and/or Discourse
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New Hollywood or post-classical Hollywood, sometimes referred to as the "American New Wave", refers to the time from roughly the late-1960s (Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate) to the early 1980s (Heaven's Gate, One from the Heart) when a new generation of young filmmakers came to prominence in America, influencing the types of films produced, their production and marketing, and impacted the way major studios approached filmmaking.

The films they made were part of the studio system, and these individuals were not "independent filmmakers", but they introduced subject matter and styles that set them apart from the studio traditions. New Hollywood has also been defined as a broader filmmaking movement influenced by this period, which has been called the “Hollywood renaissance”.




The next three videos are also up on Youtube.

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“On the other side of the screen, it all looks so easy.”

-- Tron (1982)

Post edited by Wash on
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Comments

  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
  • WashWash Registered User regular
    I believe I found it on this website

    08owef8ecd0o.jpg

  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    Oh rad! Thanks for the link. I love this one:

    tumblr_lw5y67V7ns1qe2w1uo1_500.png

  • WashWash Registered User regular
    I'm a fan of this one

    tumblr_lsxcx3lXZv1qe2w1uo1_500.jpg

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  • Page-Page- Registered User regular
    edited December 2011


    Yay?

    Post edited by Page- on
    (Mostly) Competitive Gaming Blog Updated August 18th - Monster Hunting
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  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    I like this 2001 poster

    2001poster.jpg

    and this one

    2001poster.jpg

    Also I like the original posters

    2001poster.jpg

    jBEKRTH.png
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    I love the Alamo Drafthouse's movie posters

    Tron
    Spoiler:

    New Tron
    Spoiler:

    Star Wars
    Spoiler:
    Spoiler:

    RoboCop
    Spoiler:

    Star Trek: First Contact
    Spoiler:

    And of course, the Big Lebowski
    Spoiler:

    Alamo also has the best "Don't talk during the movie" warnings ever


    Post edited by Kana on
    History is an account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools.
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    Love that 2001 poster in the OP. Especially because of Cinerama.

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    mrt144 wrote:
    Love that 2001 poster in the OP. Especially because of Cinerama.
    That's a reference to the film format, not the movie theater.

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    Each of those 2001 posters is roughly 3.7 times more enjoyable than the actual movie.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

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  • GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    I always loved the (American, I think) poster for Dracula has Risen from the Grave.
    Spoiler:

    Compared to the original, with a lovely purple-ish Dracula:
    Spoiler:

    This post was sponsored by LG.

    'Get your fucking finger on the wookie'
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    Thanatos wrote:
    mrt144 wrote:
    Love that 2001 poster in the OP. Especially because of Cinerama.
    That's a reference to the film format, not the movie theater.

    GODDAMNIT, NOW I HATE IT. THANKS THANATOS! YOU RUINER OF THINGS!

    Post edited by mrt144 on
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    This is from the last thread but that clip of hardboiled has convinced me to track down a copy. And I've seen the protector, and that scene always impresses me for what stunts they can get away with.

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    mrt144 wrote:
    Thanatos wrote:
    mrt144 wrote:
    Love that 2001 poster in the OP. Especially because of Cinerama.
    That's a reference to the film format, not the movie theater.
    GODDAMNIT, NOW I HATE IT. THANKS THANATOS! YOU RUINER OF THINGS!
    To be fair, the movie theater is named after the film format.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Each of those 2001 posters is roughly 3.7 times more enjoyable than the actual movie.

    God yes ElJeffe.


    Also, saw Mission Impossible on TV last night. The first one. Not a bad film really, but nothing special either. The plot is a hell of alot less convoluted on the second watch though. It's subtler then most in the scene where Tom Cruise figures it out though and generally doesn't hold your hand, so I can see why some people might have found it confusing.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    Thanatos wrote:
    mrt144 wrote:
    Thanatos wrote:
    mrt144 wrote:
    Love that 2001 poster in the OP. Especially because of Cinerama.
    That's a reference to the film format, not the movie theater.
    GODDAMNIT, NOW I HATE IT. THANKS THANATOS! YOU RUINER OF THINGS!
    To be fair, the movie theater is named after the film format.

    Ruined!!!

  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    Wow, MI4 was really just okay. A thoroughly forgettable experience. The most like thing I could compare it to would be Brosnan's lesser Bond films. All flash and spectacle, no heart or engaging narrative. The script was pretty lazy, and Paula Patton is a remarkably limited actress. How she got cast in this thing smacks of behind-the-scenes quid pro quo.

    I can't believe the RT disparity between this film and the much better Sherlock Holmes 2.

  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    Wow, MI4 was really just okay. A thoroughly forgettable experience. The most like thing I could compare it to would be Brosnan's lesser Bond films. All flash and spectacle, no heart or engaging narrative. The script was pretty lazy, and Paula Patton is a remarkably limited actress. How she got cast in this thing smacks of behind-the-scenes quid pro quo.

    I can't believe the RT disparity between this film and the much better Sherlock Holmes 2.

    I feel like Sherlock Holmes is one of those franchises in which critics are contractually obligated to sniff down their noses at it as they polish their monocles. The book series are classic, so omg how dare someone just make a silly, fun franchise out of them!

    Of course they're film critics, so I doubt most of them have actually read the Sherlock Holmes books, but that only makes their indignation all the stronger.

    History is an account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools.
  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    Kana wrote:
    Wow, MI4 was really just okay. A thoroughly forgettable experience. The most like thing I could compare it to would be Brosnan's lesser Bond films. All flash and spectacle, no heart or engaging narrative. The script was pretty lazy, and Paula Patton is a remarkably limited actress. How she got cast in this thing smacks of behind-the-scenes quid pro quo.

    I can't believe the RT disparity between this film and the much better Sherlock Holmes 2.

    I feel like Sherlock Holmes is one of those franchises in which critics are contractually obligated to sniff down their noses at it as they polish their monocles. The book series are classic, so omg how dare someone just make a silly, fun franchise out of them!

    Of course they're film critics, so I doubt most of them have actually read the Sherlock Holmes books, but that only makes their indignation all the stronger.

    What's weirder, I'm reading the positive RT reviews for MI4 and a lot of them seem negative. Lately I've come to cast a hairy eyeball at the way RT hands out it scores.

    But still, I agree that many of the negative reviews I've read about SH2 are completely inappropriate wrt their objective of just reviewing the goddamned movie.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    I watched the remake-of-the-movie-adaptation-of-the-book The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Damn, that was good. Good pacing, good acting, interesting plot, great soundtrack (thanks to Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross), and good cinematography. I haven't read all of the first book yet but I feel like the movie dove head-in and may have left some people who hadn't read the book in the dust, but after about an hour the really relevant plots are picked up and those are fairly easy to follow. Rooney Mara does an excellent job, managing to be both off-putting and intriguing at the same time.

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  • AllforceAllforce Registered User regular
    Kana wrote:
    I love the Alamo Drafthouse's movie posters

    Same here, I really like Tyler Stout's work (which are a number of the ones you posted above). I have these hanging up by him in my theater for now:

    Captain America
    Spoiler:

    Total Recall
    Spoiler:

    And then this Star Wars by Tom Whalen, who also does a bunch of stuff for Mondo as well:
    Spoiler:
    Spoiler:

    And here's a non-film one for Game of Thrones just because I thought it was interesting:
    Spoiler:

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    Question to anybody who has seen both the Swedish Dragon Tattoo film and the Fincher remake:

    Which film is better if you take into account that you have to read the entirety of the foreign one and thus lose a big chunk of the quality of acting?

    Which is better if you can get past that aspect of it?

    I would probably have seen the original by now if I hadn't heard Fincher was doing a remake, but the idea of being able to watch the film rather than read it is appealing.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • VariableVariable Ted Hitler Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    and Fincher isn't exactly a hack

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  • Sangheili91Sangheili91 Registered User regular
    Saw Sherlock Holmes 2 last night, and had a wonderful time. I was wondering if anyone knew what song was playing during the
    Spoiler:

    I'm always down for a great Irish kind of tune like that, but my google-fu is fail tonight.

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  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Question to anybody who has seen both the Swedish Dragon Tattoo film and the Fincher remake:

    Which film is better if you take into account that you have to read the entirety of the foreign one and thus lose a big chunk of the quality of acting?

    Which is better if you can get past that aspect of it?

    I would probably have seen the original by now if I hadn't heard Fincher was doing a remake, but the idea of being able to watch the film rather than read it is appealing.

    I'm not sure, I can't answer that because I haven't seen either version or read the books.

    But I did read an interesting review that said that Fincher's work is so strong in this one that it actually makes the source material seem as a poor choice for him to spend his time on.

    The narrative weakness of Larssen's books has been somewhat of a recurrent theme in many of the reviews I've read.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    I plan to watch the Swedish adaptation pretty soon, plus I believe the second film is out in Sweden as well.

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  • AstaerethAstaereth Registered User regular
    The narrative weakness of Larssen's books has been somewhat of a recurrent theme in many of the reviews I've read.

    Basically, yeah. They're not terribly good books, but Fincher managed to do the best possible job with them... I think he needs to get away from the whole "serial killer" thing, though. His proposed 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea adaptation has me interested for that reason.

    Find more of my writing at The Thieves' Den.
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  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    Astaereth wrote:
    The narrative weakness of Larssen's books has been somewhat of a recurrent theme in many of the reviews I've read.

    Basically, yeah. They're not terribly good books, but Fincher managed to do the best possible job with them... I think he needs to get away from the whole "serial killer" thing, though. His proposed 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea adaptation has me interested for that reason.

    Yeah, Fincher's definitely right in the middle of Hollywood's major obsession with the grimdark. I mean, there's definitely a place for that, but it doesn't seem like anyone is trying to make warm, engaging tentpole movies anymore the way they used to back in the late-70s/early-80s. Even a horror movie like Jaws featured upbeat performances and a warm palette; nowadays it seems like telling stories about serial killers and perverts is the only way to grab the attention of the community.

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    @Atomic Ross,

    I'm glad to hear you really liked Holmes 2. After just glancing at RT and reading one review it sounded just mediocre and I was going to wait for video (I did like the first one). But you really liking it is enough to change my mind, I'll probably try and see it & Dragon Tattoo next weekend.

    Also, I'd pay to watch "Sherlock Holmes and the Dragon Tattoo"

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  • AntimatterAntimatter if you want to talk to me look elsewhere.Registered User regular
    re: that alamo drafthouse poster for tron legacy

    there's a second half to it for the original tron
    this is the full image
    Spoiler:

  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    Tomanta wrote:
    @Atomic Ross,

    I'm glad to hear you really liked Holmes 2. After just glancing at RT and reading one review it sounded just mediocre and I was going to wait for video (I did like the first one). But you really liking it is enough to change my mind, I'll probably try and see it & Dragon Tattoo next weekend.

    Also, I'd pay to watch "Sherlock Holmes and the Dragon Tattoo"

    There are some complaints leveled at the Holmes movie that I can understand despite not agreeing with them. For one, the focus on detective work is much thinner than before, and the action is ramped up even more than what we got in the first film. Also, Noomi Rapace's character doesn't serve much of a purpose other than plot motivation even though she's in the film for much of its running time.

    On the otherhand, I greatly enjoyed the repartee between Downey, Law, and Stephen Fry, as their chemistry is amazing, and Jared Harris (son of the late Dumbledore) is cunning and fantastic Moriarty. And despite the action being more prominent than in the first film, it plays more realistically and in-camera here, and the plot almost always justifies its occurrence (if not always its length). It's not a perfect film, but it's a fun film and a film that takes its fun without cynicism or pandering.



    Even many of the reviewers I follow and respect have championed MI4 while poo-pooing Holmes 2, but reading their reviews it seems like two different standards are being used. Holmes, on one hand, is derided for avoiding much of the Doyle canon and being so focused on the dynamic between Holmes and Watson, while MI4 has people singing its praises for being a weightless trifle of an action movie starring a charismatic lead.

    It's like they're saying since they expected Holmes to be great and it somehow fell short, then it's crap; and since MI4 only has to be modestly awful to top its previous volumes, its mere competence wins top prize.

  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    Wow, I had not put it together that Jared Harris was Richard Harris' son. As if he needed more reason to be awesome.

  • BagginsesBagginses __BANNED USERS regular
    I didn't love SH2. There were a lot of laughs but Holmes seemed like too much of a caricature. My main problem, though, was the quick-cut sequences, which I couldn't follow at all. Of course, I may not have been in the best condition, as it was the evening after an all-night Tiger and Bunny marathon. Every once in a while, I'd shut my eyes, then panic about missing subtitles before remembering that the movie was in English.

  • metaghostmetaghost Registered User regular
    Just finished watching Valhalla Rising, Nicholas Winding Refn's previous film before Drive. I had no idea what it was about going into it, simply finding it playing on IFC, and was surprised to find that it largely struck me as an homage to Herzog's Aguirre: The Wrath of God. I'm curious if Refn has ever made explicit acknowledgement of that, as it follows a similarly surreal course of action accompanied by an unsettling synth score.

    Regardless, stylish stuff, with its high-contrast, tinted imagery and staccato cuts of future events spliced into long stretches of silent misery. Recommend checking it out, though I wouldn't necessarily call it "entertaining". Mads Mikkelsen, aka Le Chifre, sure has an interesting face, especially when he appears to be wearing a scrotum for an eyepatch.

  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus IT'S DARE! Registered User regular
    Antimatter wrote:
    re: that alamo drafthouse poster for tron legacy

    there's a second half to it for the original tron
    this is the full image
    Spoiler:

    Wow.

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  • AntimatterAntimatter if you want to talk to me look elsewhere.Registered User regular
    It's a fucking awesome piece.

  • ZzuluZzulu Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Question to anybody who has seen both the Swedish Dragon Tattoo film and the Fincher remake:

    Which film is better if you take into account that you have to read the entirety of the foreign one and thus lose a big chunk of the quality of acting?

    Which is better if you can get past that aspect of it?

    I would probably have seen the original by now if I hadn't heard Fincher was doing a remake, but the idea of being able to watch the film rather than read it is appealing.

    The end to the swedish one is better and I liked the lead actress better in the Swedish one but Fincher did a lot of things better as a whole as well

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  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    I saw Repo Men the other night and it was pretty fucking stupid. I was hopeful since I really like Jude Law, but I spent the entire time wondering why super-powerful dystopian corporations wouldn't do simple things to collect their body bits like bother tracking who had which body parts or maybe implant the same goddamn GPS technology into the parts that we currently have in phones instead of having contract mercs wander around at random pointing detectors at people and hoping they got lucky.
    Spoiler:

    Oh, and the film begins with probably the stupidest and most pointless explanation of the Schroedinger's Cat experiment that I have heard, so it started on the wrong foot with me. And in the end Jude Law writes a book called "The Repossession Mambo" and I was thinking what a stupid name for a book that was and then found out it's the name of the book the movie was based on. So yeah.

    Basically: don't see it.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    metaghost wrote:
    Just finished watching Valhalla Rising, Nicholas Winding Refn's previous film before Drive. I had no idea what it was about going into it, simply finding it playing on IFC, and was surprised to find that it largely struck me as an homage to Herzog's Aguirre: The Wrath of God. I'm curious if Refn has ever made explicit acknowledgement of that, as it follows a similarly surreal course of action accompanied by an unsettling synth score.

    Regardless, stylish stuff, with its high-contrast, tinted imagery and staccato cuts of future events spliced into long stretches of silent misery. Recommend checking it out, though I wouldn't necessarily call it "entertaining". Mads Mikkelsen, aka Le Chifre, sure has an interesting face, especially when he appears to be wearing a scrotum for an eyepatch.

    Anybody who has seen Wrath of God would make the analogy, yeah. I have no idea if Refn ever commented on Hercog being an influence though.
    If you can find it, watch the first Pusher too. It's very decent.

    Post edited by zeeny on
  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    unsettling synth score.
    Interest: raised
    high-contrast, tinted imagery
    Interest: lowered

    Post edited by wandering on
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