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Awesome: 'Kemet Please! A New Ancient Egyptian-themed webcomic' by Heartlash

HeartlashHeartlash Registered User regular
edited February 2012 in [2008-2012] Awesome Posts?
What software are you using to make these comics? Are you starting with pencil/paper or using a mouse/tablet?

It looks like you're pretty new to digital art, here are some basic tips based on your work:

1. Your colors are over saturated, the blues, yellows, and browns are all so deep that they create a high contrast look that's hard on the eyes. Try using more pastel colors, it may help things flow together.

2. Spend some time drawing from life. This is a common mantra here. Your anatomy lacks confidence (blob arms, blob feet, inconsistent proportions, etc). Practice practice practice.

3. Vary your line width. Right now all the lines are exactly the same width, which hurts from a compositional standpoint and makes everything feel very flat. Try making more central foreground lines thicker, while making less important background lines thinner.

4. Spend some time on composition before you start actually drawing. Do an extremely rough version just to get the staging done. Don't be afraid to scrap it and move things around if it's not coming off as interesting. Once you've figured out exactly where everything will go, then start actually rendering out your work.

5. Study comics you like. Look at what they do and think about what separates your comic from there's.

Good luck with your comic, you'll find yourself improving naturally the more you keep at it, so don't quit.

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