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I want to get a bicycle

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Posts

  • EshEsh Tending bar. Eating out. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited February 2012
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_K3LsaGxYIZg/SlnjgV2Mr6I/AAAAAAAAAnE/kxiAJjnFerY/s400/miles_fenders2.jpg

    They'll prevent you from spattering yourself with rain and mud if it's wet out.

    Esh on
    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."

    Final Fantasy XIV:Lilja Sunblade
  • DangerousDangerous Registered User regular
    For any longer ride, a breathable, moisture wicking top like this will go a long way to keeping you cooler and more comfortable. A lot of people dislike spandex, but a good pair of cycling shorts makes a huge difference. For people not wanting to sport full lycra I always recommend wearing something like these under your regular gym shorts.

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  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote:

    I'm not sure what you're trying to argue. The only benefit of treads is to allow a place for water to go, so that it can not become trapped under the tire. There are no other benefits of having tread on surfaces that don't have loose material. So anything like asphalt, steel, man hole covers, whatever, the benefit of tread is to prevent hydroplaning (or the trapping of water under a tire). You agree that hydroplaning is not an issue for bicycles. Therefore treads have no benefit.

    You're quoting me wrong. I wrote that "I agree that hydroplaning as is found with cars" is not an issue for bikes - important difference.

    With a car you can experience hydroplaning that leaves one or more tire totally without contact with the road surface and that is not what happens with a bicycle. On a bike it's a question of part of the tire loosing grip and that loss of grip can make the difference between riding on two wheels and crashing.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote:

    I'm not sure what you're trying to argue. The only benefit of treads is to allow a place for water to go, so that it can not become trapped under the tire. There are no other benefits of having tread on surfaces that don't have loose material. So anything like asphalt, steel, man hole covers, whatever, the benefit of tread is to prevent hydroplaning (or the trapping of water under a tire). You agree that hydroplaning is not an issue for bicycles. Therefore treads have no benefit.

    You're quoting me wrong. I wrote that "I agree that hydroplaning as is found with cars" is not an issue for bikes - important difference.

    With a car you can experience hydroplaning that leaves one or more tire totally without contact with the road surface and that is not what happens with a bicycle. On a bike it's a question of part of the tire loosing grip and that loss of grip can make the difference between riding on two wheels and crashing.

    One last response because thanatos specifically asked about treads in the rain. I don't believe you've given any reasons for why treads should be better in the rain. You say it's a question of loosing grip, but what does that have to do with the treads. From everything I can find on the subject, you will have a better chance of not loosing grip with a slick tire. I tried to do some quick research on the subject, avoiding any forums, and I found this, this, this, and this.

    The first two straight up say you should use slicks over treads. The third one doesn't specifically say it, but it says increased traction for wet tires is mostly accomplished with a change in the material; and if you look at tires they recommend, they have very slight treads. Way, way less than you would see on a mountain bike tire. On top of which they specifically mention that the treads are mostly for allowing the tire to deform a small amount, and not for clearing away water. The last one says that you might consider getting a tire with tread, but it then mentions that other experts believe you shouldn't, and in fact never gives an answer to what they've found to be better.

    Unless you can point to some reason or citation that shows why treads improve traction in wet weather, I really believe that you are better suited using a slick, or one of the very slightly treaded, made for rain, tires.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    Thanatos wrote:
    What accessories are worthwhile to get? Like, is it worth it getting those bike pants and stuff, or is it okay to ride in jeans or shorts or whatever? What's the best sort of gear for dealing with rain, just a jacket or windbreaker, or should I be wearing a specific kind of shirt or something?

    Generally it depends how far you're going and in what conditions.

    Like, my ride to work is only about seven miles, so if I'm riding my sensible bike with the rack and mudguards (aka fenders) I ride in whatever I'm wearing, with maybe a change of shirt in my bag if it's warm.

    If I'm riding my road bike to work then I tend to wear bike clothes, because I have no self-control and will play at being a time trialist. Not lycra, though, usually a pair of 3/4 length MTB shorts and a merino wool base layer (merino's great, and it doesn't stink if you sweat into it like artificial fabrics do).

    For all-day rides on the road bike I'll go full lycra. On the mountain bike I'll wear looser fitting bike stuff, mostly because the loose fabric takes the sting out of anything flicked up by the wheels, or undergrowth that whips across your legs or body.

    In terms of dealing with the rain, I mostly just live with it. My experience with waterproofs is primarily that unless you get something very high end, you get a kind of "boil-in-the-bag" effect that gets you just as wet as the rain will. Again, mudguards/fenders are your friend because the spray from your wheels will usually get you wetter than the rain unless it's a tropical monsoon.

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    So I got my bike, a Synapse 6 for a grand. I was going to get the 849 version but this version has a better version of shifters which felt easier to use.

    I'm definitely glad that I went to the actual store. The people there were super friendly and really made me feel like I was making an informed choice. I also get a lifetime service guarantee and got some tips about riding. Won't be hesitating to give them more of my business.

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  • saltinesssaltiness Registered User regular
    Excellent choice. Cannondale make great bikes and you did right in upgrading to the 6 because Tiagra shifters are far superior to Sora. Now ride the hell out of it.

    XBL: heavenkils
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