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What's an Amiga? *NSF56K*

24

Posts

  • HelloweenHelloween Registered User regular
    Shiiiit. Nostaglia overload. I remmeber playing Alien Breed, Shadow fighter and bubble and squeak with a friend. Something else too, red nose the cave man maybe? Been too long to be sure. Also, the Turricain ports were works of art. Wonderful thread, great read

    See all of my Let's Plays Here:
    Youtube Channel!
  • BigDesBigDes Registered User regular


    Fuck yeah Moonstone

    steam_sig.png
  • IgortIgort Registered User regular
    man there are some serious omissions here

    ...

    bitmap bros shit like speedball 2: brutal deluxe and chaos engine (clearly best version)

    Chaos Engine was one of my favourite games as a kid.

    worldorder_zpse336707a.jpg
  • BeastehBeasteh THAT WOULD NOT KILL DRACULARegistered User regular
    chuck rock, zool 2, james pond codename: robocod, rick dangerous, turrican 2, agony, micro machines, project-x, apidya

    these are all from memory

  • lu tzelu tze Registered User
    Anyone remember Wings?

    Man that game was so good.

    World's best janitor
  • BarneyLBarneyL Registered User
    eobet wrote: »
    I had an Atari ST... and the lack of Dungeon Master in this thread is shameful.

    The best thing about Dungeon Master was that it loaded the entire game into memory at the start but they programmed the game to make the disk drive buzz at various times just to make you think something big and nasty was being loaded and about to happen.

    steam_sig.png
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    Helloween wrote: »
    Shiiiit. Nostaglia overload. I remmeber playing Alien Breed, Shadow fighter and bubble and squeak with a friend. Something else too, red nose the cave man maybe? Been too long to be sure. Also, the Turricain ports were works of art. Wonderful thread, great read

    Big Nose Caveman, an obvious Hanna-barbera rip off. Screw Attack did an episode on an unlicensed NES copy of the game where they were baffled by the european practice of taking obvious licensed properties and dropping the license for international audiences (such as how coolspot lacks the 7-up license in europe).

    And the chaos engine is f'n awesome. I have the CD32 version along with the A1200 version of the sequel. The sequel isn't so good, mainly because it's a very different game, but the first one rules.

  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    Speaking of CD32 titles, I'd like to speak for a minute about their packaging. Or rather lack of packaging. They are easily the worst packed games I've ever played. The bigbox versions of games are usually awesome - badass boxart, really thick manual, complex codewheel, the works essentially. By contrast, CD32 games come in standard jewel cases with manuals that are usually 1 page long and cover the bare minimum of loading the game... in 4 languages.

    For this reason alone, I go out of my way to pick up the big box versions along with the cd32 releases. Example - I have the cd32 version of Shadow Fighters, along with the big box a1200 release.

    Also, the jewel case covers for some of these releases are terrible. Look at this:

    qnejG.jpg

    WTF is that? 80% of the cover is the publisher logo. As far as I know, this isn't a pack-in version or anything, this is the only cd32 version of chuck rock. There was no big box cd32 version.

    awful.

    TheSonicRetard on
  • descdesc P.L.U.R. Registered User regular
    Bitmap Brothers 4lyfe

  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    desc wrote: »
    Bitmap Brothers 4lyfe

    My favorite Amiga developer/publisher had to be Gremlin. They put out so much high quality stuff across such a wide range of genres. And they still put out great games to this day.

    Team-17 comes in second, and Bitmap Bros are a very close third. I think Bitmap Bros were too hit or miss - gods, for example, while usually cited as one of the best amiga games, just didn't click with me. It's too slow.

  • ApostateApostate Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    I had both an Amiga 500 and an Amiga 2000. Just being able to load from the HD was pretty cool. I think that was the first computer I had that had a "desktop."

    Some of my favorites:

    Breach
    The Xcom of it's day for me.
    513149-breach-amiga-screenshot-title-screens.png513147-breach-amiga-screenshot-taking-out-base-defensess.png

    Eye of the Beholder
    Great refinement of the Dungeon Master style of game. Had some cool cinematics.
    eye_of_the_beholder_01.png41783-eye-of-the-beholder-amiga-screenshot-the-weakest-type-of-enemy.gif

    Dragon's Lair
    I put this in here because no other computer could do this at the time. I think there were only like 8 or 9 of the game's "levels" from the original in the Amiga version and they would often repeat sequences to pad it out. And yet it still came on 6 disks. So playing it was basically: load...load...load, play level, swap disk, load...load...load, play level, swap disk, load...load...and so on. Looking back it amazes me what I would sit through back then (especially for what amounted to basically 30 secs of animation).
    dragons_lair_01.pngdragons_lair_12.png

    Psygnosis
    I will always have a warm place in my heart for this and other Psygnosis games. Yeah they often played like crap but they looked and sounded so good.
    Obliterator
    35077-obliterator-amiga-screenshot-title-screens.gif35078-obliterator-amiga-screenshot-the-opening-sequences.gif35080-obliterator-amiga-screenshot-watch-out-for-the-aliens.gif
    The Killing Game Show
    lcover.jpgkillinggame.png

    Cinemaware
    Easily the best games and presentation to me. Really shined on the Amiga (with a few exceptions).

    Rocket Ranger
    Screw you Rocketteer, I was punching Nazi's out before you were a glimmer in your daddy's eye (well the movie anyway).
    rocket_ranger_01.pngrocket_ranger_15.png
    rocket_ranger_03.pngrocket_ranger_17.png

    It Came from the Desert
    Just an all around classic.
    it_came_from_the_desert_01.png37682-it-came-from-the-desert-amiga-screenshot-dang-missed-it-s.gif
    265236-it-came-from-the-desert-amiga-screenshot-giant-ants-spotted.pngit_came_from_the_desert_12.png

    Apostate on
  • eobeteobet Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    EDIT: I will say, however, that the Beast games have pretty much the greatest box art EVER. Psygnosis used to have the best style boxes. I am looking for a complete bigbox collection of the beast games based on their boxart alone.

    Of course they had. Roger Dean did them.

    EDIT: Aaaahhh... Cinemaware and the Bitmap Brothers, what a crime to forget them (me included)! Mmm, I love the smell of nostalgia in the morning...

    eobet on
    Heard the proposition that RIAA and MPAA should join forces and form "Music And Film Industry Association"?
  • FeralFeral Who needs a medical license when you've got style? Registered User regular
    I love this thread and I love this OP and I love TSR for making it.

    An Amiga 2000 with a RAM card addon (8M of RAM!) and a 325MB SCSI HD got me through high school.

    It was also the first* computer I ever used to get online.
    * - I had a 300 baud telephone coupler modem for my Commodore 64 a few years prior, but I almost never used it.

    You know what I loved? Aminet. To quote Wikipedia: "Aminet was the first attempt by an internet community to create a centralized public archive maintained by the users themselves, and to keep the community united and free to download new open source software, new program demo releases, patches and localization of Amiga programs (AmigaOS and its modern programs are free to be localized by any single user into any country language). Its creation predates of various years any Linux archive or PC archive or archives for other platforms."

    Today, we kind of take it for granted that freeware games and demos, and utilities, will be available for download through Steam, CNet, Majorgeeks, or whatever other download service you like. In 1994, those services didn't exist, and Aminet was like Christmas every fucking day.

    Sadly, the machine was destroyed in a flood. I saved some of the files on it to floppy, promising myself I'd convert them to PC format someday, but I never did.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch, man" fallacy.
  • FeralFeral Who needs a medical license when you've got style? Registered User regular
    SanderJK wrote: »
    The fact that workbench booted quickly of a single floppy into a functional OS is pretty amazing.

    It was also the first OS capable of true preemptive multitasking and on-the-fly memory reallocation widely available to home users.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch, man" fallacy.
  • fragglefartfragglefart Registered User regular
    I've got a boxed Amiga 600 HD upstairs, belongs to the missus. Barely ever used, still has everything with it!

    Like the one on the left here;

    a600langepic.jpg

    I'll sell it one day when all the others are broken.

    fragglefart.jpg
  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    Always wanted an Amiga 1200. Every month, I would buy Zzap! 64/Commodore Force and stare wistfully at the Silica adverts and that shiny new A1200... never did get one in the end. Kept using my 8-bit Commodore machines (C64 + C128) right up until 1999, when I switched full time over to pc and left Commodore behind. And, after all these years, I still dream about getting that Amiga. Right now my plan is to finish my Commodore setup with the purchase of a 1541 Ultimate II cartridge, and then start looking around for a shiny new(ish) A1200. Amigakit is no longer selling any of the classic systems, I'm too late, so I'll have to scour Aminet and eBay when I get around to it.

    Love everything about the Amiga. Beautiful machine, so far ahead of it's time.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • stlobusstlobus Registered User regular
    I've still got my Amiga 500 and this thread is making me think it's time to set it up again.

    PSN/SEN: lobus Steam: stlobus XBox: St Lobus NNID: Lobus42
  • FeralFeral Who needs a medical license when you've got style? Registered User regular
    BTW, the OP says that the only Amiga models worth worrying about are the 500 and the 1200. For gaming, perhaps, but I wanted to give some love to the Amiga 4000.

    It was notable because it had the more advanced graphics hardware of the A1200 (the 1200 and 4000 were the only Amigas capable of 24-bit color at 640x480; the only other desktop computer on the market at the time capable of that was one of the higher-end Macintoshes at about double the price) but unlike the 1200, it also had expansion slots. There were a number of expansion modules you could get for music production or SCSI scanner support or whatever, but there were three really important ones:

    1) A 386 board so you could run MS-DOS.
    2) Video Toaster.
    3) Raptor.

    TSR said: "If you were in television or film, you used an Amiga at the time to do video editing." and that was mostly true. All of the big Hollywood special effects shops were using Silicon Graphics workstations. And up until the mid-90s, the Silicon Graphics platform was a mainframe model - you developed your scenes on the workstation, and then sent it up to an SGI mainframe (the size of a refrigerator) for rendering. If you didn't have an SGI mainframe, you rented time on one. Even the workstations themselves were extremely expensive.

    An Amiga 4000 with a Video Toaster cost about half (IIRC) of the MSRP of the lowest-end SGI workstation, and gave a small independent video artist everything he needed to do video capture, editing, CGI, and chromakey (green-screen or blue-screen).

    The Raptor module was a distributed computing platform that allowed multiple Amigas connected in a Raptor net to work together on a large rendering job. This meant that small special effects houses could add machines as they hired people, and never had to buy a separate rendering server.

    This was a really big deal, and led directly to the creation of this:

    Smb5-s4.jpg

    The pilot episode of B5 had more full-screen CGI per hour than any other television show, including Star Trek: DS9, which was produced entirely on Amigas. Later on, as the show got more popular, they'd use a combination of SGI and Amiga machines.

    It was a risky maneuver to try to launch a sci-fi series, based on a brand new property, in direct competition with Star Trek. I can't say for sure that it wouldn't have happened without the inexpensive 3D capabilities of the A4000, but it's not an unreasonable speculation.

    A4000s continued to be used as 3D graphics workstations in Hollywood and TV long after it had fully died out as a personal computing platform in the US.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch, man" fallacy.
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    I've got a boxed Amiga 600 HD upstairs, belongs to the missus. Barely ever used, still has everything with it!

    Like the one on the left here;

    a600langepic.jpg

    I'll sell it one day when all the others are broken.

    I have this bundle:

    amiga+1200+desktop+dynamite.png

    hideous packaging, containing absolute awesomeness inside. The boxart for that Epic bundle looks awesome.

  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    The Epic bundle cost quite a bit iirc.

    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    Just how big is the Amiga 600? I have both a 500 and a 1200, and they're huge.

  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    Cut the numerical keyboard off an A1200 - you have an A600.

    Edit - Can't find anything but this on Google, oddly.

    amiga-600-1200.jpg

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    Rohan wrote: »
    Cut the numerical keyboard off an A1200 - you have an A600.

    Edit - Can't find anything but this on Google, oddly.

    amiga-600-1200.jpg

    So, essentially, no where near as small as the ZX Spectrum?

  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    Nono. Think C64 without the function keys. My cousin had an A600 and we had both it and my C64 setup alongside.

    Edit - Blurry picture for comparison -

    corner1mb7.jpg

    Note - not my setup.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • mere_immortalmere_immortal So tasty!Registered User regular
    I played so much Lemmings, Project X and Rodland on my Amiga.

    Also everytime one of these threads comes up I head straight to ebay.

    Steam: Dr. Mark Sloan - XBL: lego pencil - Wii U: mimmortal - 3DS: 0748-1545-6684 - Bordgamegeek: mere_immortal
  • fragglefartfragglefart Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    eobet wrote: »
    Ah, missed the exclusivity part. Then what about the Shadow of the Beast series?

    Those are also on just about every system ever. And while you could argue that Shadow of the Beast is just as iconic to Amiga as Turrican (or maybe even more-so since Turrican gets claimed by numerous C=64 fans as well), I'm of the opinion that only Beast III is worth playing - the other two are maddeningly difficult and their level design is... well, questionable.

    EDIT: I will say, however, that the Beast games have pretty much the greatest box art EVER. Psygnosis used to have the best style boxes. I am looking for a complete bigbox collection of the beast games based on their boxart alone.

    Man, the Beast 2 boxart was amazing, the huge monsters were amazing, the atmosphere and setting was amazing, but that game was hard as balls when I was 9 or 10 or whatever it was.

    And this was the coolest thing;



    Although the threatening intro was almost as good (and it had animation :P)



    That music, so much nostalgia...

    I beat the first game on the Master System. Was a total bitch. So worth it though. And it even had that awesome parallax scrolling!

    fragglefart on
    fragglefart.jpg
  • Mr_GrinchMr_Grinch Registered User regular
    I'm so going to post something more in here when I'm not preparing to go on holiday! One of my favourite platformers:



    Rick Dangerous!

    Also I can't believe I forgot to mention Zool 2, I loved that game. It's the first platformer I played where you could wall jump (iirc) and that just blew my mind.

    Steam: Sir_Grinch
    PSN: SirGrinchX
    Xbox Live: SirGrinch X
  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    Rick Dangerous and it's sequel were equally great on the C64, loved those games.

    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • BigDesBigDes Registered User regular
    I've got a boxed Amiga 600 HD upstairs, belongs to the missus. Barely ever used, still has everything with it!

    Like the one on the left here;

    a600langepic.jpg

    I'll sell it one day when all the others are broken.

    That fucking language lab bundle was the best way of sneaking a home console into my house, it was amazing.

    steam_sig.png
  • ApostateApostate Registered User regular
    A couple more.

    Hybris
    I think I broke a joystick on this game I played it so much. One of the best soundtracks of any Amiga game.



    Powermonger
    Some vintage Bullfrog. I loved the look and feel of it but I never could quite figure out how to play the game (At least very well). It was a little too complex compared to what I had played before. One of those I might try to dig up.
    powermonger.jpg


    And in the WTF category some typical Amiga pr0n.

    Hollywood Poker
    Yes you too can play poker for hours on end with your reward being a still of some skanky low res pixelated bewbs. Really hot stuff there. Not sure where the "Hollywood" is involved in this.
    hollywood%20poker_005.png

  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    Mr_Grinch wrote: »
    Also I can't believe I forgot to mention Zool 2, I loved that game. It's the first platformer I played where you could wall jump (iirc) and that just blew my mind.

    You were right to tell me to steer clear of Zool 1, however. Like I said, that game had so many fundamental problems. Its design philosophy could be boiled down to one simple point - be MORE than Sonic the Hedgehog. Unfortunately, it wound up being a mess of a game. It was FASTER, but without reason - the game design never took advantage of the speed. The biggest flaw was the level design, it had none. Each level was simply moving from the left side of the screen to the right without any real paths or diversions. You'd run into long towering spires of platforms that lead into the sky, right into a dead end. There was absolutely no reason to go in any direction besides right. Zool 1 had technically good graphics, but they were lifeless without style. It boiled down to a bunch of well drawn real-world objects strewn about without rhyme or reason. And every boss was the same - a random, floating object (a bee, a saxophone, the letter O, etc) that shot bullets at you.

    I already had Zool 2 for the Jaguar, but I played maybe 5 minutes of it and passed, writing it off as more of the same. I'm not sure entirely how I got the Amiga CD32 version - probably in one of the group of games I purchased, but since I got it shortly after getting my CD32, I wound up popping it in over and over again because I was starved for something with depth to play on the console. It helps that the opening stage in the CD32 version - exclusive to that version - is leagues better than Swan Lake, the stereotypical green level from just about every platformer ever. And the CD soundtrack kicked ass. The improved controls also helped out.

    But the biggest factor in Zool 2 that won me over was its level design. Not only is it present, it's actually great. There are tons of branching paths, and each level has a few mechanics used sparringly which keeps the game from being repetitive. By the time I got to Tootin' Common, I realized that it was a great game. The biggest change seems to be that Gremlin stopped trying to create a Sonic-killer, and instead concentrated on making a game which stood on its own merit. The reoccurring boss - Mental Block - is also a great badguy with tons of variety.

    It even takes a page from Sonic & Knuckles by giving each playable character slightly different moves which leads them through unique parts of the level unseen by the other. Zool 2 was released in 1994, which is about the time that the other big developers/publishers for the Amiga (Team-17, Bitmap Bros, Neon, etc) really hit their stride, just like you'd expect any game maker worth a damn to. That was a great year for Gremlin, and sampling their library from that time period cemented them as my favorite Amiga developer. It made me appreciate Sumo Digital even more as I now see them as a very seasoned developer with a long and glorious pedigree. They don't get the respect they deserve IMO.

    What's baffling though is that Zool 2 got much worse reviews from the Amiga magazines than Zool 1. The scores for Zool 1 are all in the 95% range, while Zool 2 reviews can dip as low as 35%. Reading the text associated with these reviews makes it sound like the reviewers were jilted lovers, as they all express a sort of hatred for Zool because the supposed Amiga mascot appeared on Sega and Nintendo. It's a shame, because Zool 2, the much better game, largely remained Amiga exclusive.

    I've also come to appreciate the Jaguar game, but that's for another topic. I've also gotten big into Jaguar collecting, and I have over 40 games for it. I think that's also a massively misrepresented system, so perhaps one day in the future it'll get its own "What is an Atari Jaguar *NSF56k*" topic.

  • BeastehBeasteh THAT WOULD NOT KILL DRACULARegistered User regular
    oh man the sounds enemies made when you killed them in rick dangerous

    8-> memories 8->

  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    Beasteh wrote: »
    oh man the sounds enemies made when you killed them in rick dangerous

    8-> memories 8->

    Perhaps it's just me, but I associate Rick Dangerous more with the C=64 than the Amiga.

  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited February 2012


    Rick Dangerous Amiga.



    Rick Dangerous C64.

    There's hardly any difference between them, the Amiga game looked nicer overall and had voices in place of the SID's effects, but the two are very close. In fact, many of the Amiga's earlier games were multi-platform releases that, if you were poorer, could get on the C64 and there wouldn't be much of a difference at all. Obviously games like Castle Master from the Freescape series benefitted from the faster cpu, and filled polygons in Elite are preferable over wireframe 3d, but platforming games like Rick Dangerous, Rodland and Flimbo's Quest for example were all very close. Zzap! 64 used to review both versions of the games until they saw sense and launched their own Amiga magazine. Some comparisons below (spoilered for long) -
    Spoiler:

    Whew... long post, sorry.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • BeastehBeasteh THAT WOULD NOT KILL DRACULARegistered User regular
    oh god i havent seen this in maybe 20 years

  • Mr_GrinchMr_Grinch Registered User regular
    Sleepwalker was also one of my favourite games ever. Something about it's premise really appealed to me. There was no way you could die, you were an immortal cartoon dog. You had to run around and protect your sleep walking master from being run over, electrocuted, falling in pits, etc. And you did this by putting yourself in constant danger, dangling over gaps so he could walk over you and so on.

    I remember it being really difficult but probably haven't really played it since the year of it's release! I remember it also had some kind of tie in with red nose day, and Lenny Henry did the voice of the dog, or the intro, or something like that.

    Apparently it was released on the SNES as eek the cat! Which I've just found out thanks to wikipedia.

    Steam: Sir_Grinch
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  • RamiRami Registered User regular
    I remember sleepwalker being a challenge on an episode of gamesmaster. I also remember someone using a cheat code in a James Pond challenge, and still losing.

    I had James Pond on the Amiga too. I thought it was incredible but I never managed to beat it. I played the sequel on the gameboy I think but didn't like it, since it was no longer set underwater it was just a boring platform game with a time limit.

    Steam / Xbox Live: WSDX 3DS FC: 2637-9461-8549
    sig.gif
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck NONSTOP INFINITE CLIMAX POSTING you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    also Elf

    Elf was balla

    obF2Wuw.png
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    So kinda neato - Racketboy might be interested in publishing this article as their Amiga 101 guide.

  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    I have no idea who or what Racketboy is, but congrats! Your OP is concise and goes to show how passionate you are for the machine, willing to go the lengths you did in order that you get a PAL machine playable across the pond.

    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
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