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Roasts and Casseroles. [Cooking and Food Thread]

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Posts

  • StaleStale Registered User regular
    yeah, if only you had some kind of cad skills


    should look into that

    easysig2.jpg
  • StaleStale Registered User regular
    also, just for @javen and @sheri

    Egg-White Frittata with Leeks

    MAKES 1 TO 2 SERVINGS START TO FINISH: 25 MINUTES



    2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 tablespoon unsalted butter

    1 large leek, white part only, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)

    1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

    Salt and freshly ground black pepper

    6 large egg whites

    3 tablespoons finely grated pecorino cheese

    ½ cup baby arugula

    ¼ cup mizuna leaves

    Half a lemon

    1. Preheat the oven to 350°.
    2. In a 7-inch nonstick skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil with the butter over medium-low heat until bubbling. Add the leek and cook until soft, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, season with salt and pepper and cook for 1 minute longer.

    3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the egg whites with 2 tablespoons of the cheese. Add to the skillet and gently scramble with the leeks over medium-low heat for 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the pan with a rubber spatula.

    4. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake for about 7 minutes, or until the center of the frittata stiffens (check by gently shaking the pan) and is fully cooked. Transfer the frittata to a plate, sprinkle with the remaining cheese and serve.

    5. In a mixing bowl, combine the arugula and mizuna. Toss with the remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper and additional lemon juice, if desired. Mound the greens on top of the frittata and serve immediately.

    easysig2.jpg
  • Lost SalientLost Salient Z is for Zillah who drank too much ginRegistered User regular
    Bedigunz wrote: »
    I asked this in the last thread before it got locked but does anyone have a good Shepard's pie recipe?

    Man, nobody?

    I'll help you out.

    2 (14 1/2 oz) cans beef broth
    2 oz dried porcini mushrooms
    3 lb new potatoes, cut into 1" chunks
    8 cloves garlic
    1 c (2 sticks) unsalted butter
    3/4 c creme fraiche
    1/2 c heavy cream
    2 green onions, finely chopped
    3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
    salt and pepper
    2 yellow onions, chopped
    3 c sliced button mushrooms
    2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms
    3 lb ground beef
    1/2 c all-purpose flour
    1 c dry sherry
    2 tbsp soy sauce
    2 tbsp dried thyme
    6 fresh ears of corn, kernels cut from the cob

    In a medium saucepan, bring the broth to a boil. Add the dried porcini mushrooms, turn off the heat and let stand for at least 1/2 hour.

    Place the potatoes and garlic in a large saucepan; cover with water and bring to a boil. Cook until the potatoes and garlic are soft when pierced with the tip of a knife. Drain well. Mash the potatoes and garlic. Stir in 6 tbsp of the butter, the creme fraiche, heavy cream, green onions and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

    Preheat the oven to 350 F. Lightly grease a 3 1/2 to 4 quart baking dish; set aside.

    Melt 6 tbsp of the butter in a large skillet. Add the yellow onions and button and shiitake mushrooms; saute over medium heat, stirring, until the onions are soft, about 8 minutes. Add the ground beef; cook, stirring, until well browned, about 10 minutes.

    Drain the porcini mushrooms, reserving the soaking liquid. Finely chop the mushrooms.

    Sprinkle the flour over the beef mixture. Cook and stir for 3 minutes. Stir in the sherry, porcini mushrooms, and the reserved soaking liquid. Cook, stirring, until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and thyme. Season with salt and pepper.

    Melt the remaining 1/2 c butter in a medium skillet. Stir in the corn and saute for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

    Spoon the beef mixture into the prepared dish; spread evenly. Spread the corn over the beef. Spoon the potatoes over the corn; spread evenly. Bake for 45 minutes or until hot throughout.

    QuW2glN.jpg"Sandra's favourite movie is escape from new York because she cries when magpie and brain die because they will never be together." i read books sometimes
  • The GeekThe Geek Oh-Two Crew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Thinking about picking up a pork roast to crock pot up with some red potatoes and veggies for next week.

    zappsigsm.jpg
    Amazon wish list | Please check out my wife's blog and jewelry store.
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Stale wrote: »
    also, just for @javen and @sheri

    Egg-White Frittata with Leeks

    MAKES 1 TO 2 SERVINGS START TO FINISH: 25 MINUTES



    2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 tablespoon unsalted butter

    1 large leek, white part only, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)

    1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

    Salt and freshly ground black pepper

    6 large egg whites

    3 tablespoons finely grated pecorino cheese

    ½ cup baby arugula

    ¼ cup mizuna leaves

    Half a lemon

    1. Preheat the oven to 350°.
    2. In a 7-inch nonstick skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil with the butter over medium-low heat until bubbling. Add the leek and cook until soft, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, season with salt and pepper and cook for 1 minute longer.

    3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the egg whites with 2 tablespoons of the cheese. Add to the skillet and gently scramble with the leeks over medium-low heat for 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the pan with a rubber spatula.

    4. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake for about 7 minutes, or until the center of the frittata stiffens (check by gently shaking the pan) and is fully cooked. Transfer the frittata to a plate, sprinkle with the remaining cheese and serve.

    5. In a mixing bowl, combine the arugula and mizuna. Toss with the remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper and additional lemon juice, if desired. Mound the greens on top of the frittata and serve immediately.

    Sheri probably hates leeks also.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • SheriSheri Resident Fluffer My Living RoomRegistered User regular
  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    Nah, she's actually not a very picky eater flavor-wise, but certain textures can kind of put her off.

    Nowhere in close proximity can do halfway decent produce anyway.

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  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Sheri wrote: »
    Leeks are just fine

    Jerk.

    I am not a jerk!

    I'm a butt.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    Made a pretty excellent ratatouille a few days ago.

  • FyndirFyndir Registered User regular
    Druhim wrote:
    Sheri wrote: »
    Leeks are just fine

    Jerk.

    I am not a jerk!

    I'm a butt.

    You're a jerked butt.

  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    Fyndir wrote: »
    Druhim wrote:
    Sheri wrote: »
    Leeks are just fine

    Jerk.

    I am not a jerk!

    I'm a butt.

    You're a jerked butt.

    I have that dvd

    STEAM
    Spoiler:
  • SyphyreSyphyre A Dangerous Pastime Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    This is my standard Lasagna recipe. It fits into two large casserole dishes, (sometimes plus a third smaller one) so it serves a ton of people. I always make this much and freeze at least a pan of it for having a month down the road. You can easily chop it in half.

    It's pretty simple, it's just time consuming to make (2-3 hours).

    Lasagna

    Sauce:
    2½ lb ground beef sirloin
    1¼ lb mild italian sausage (ground)
    1 Large Bulb of Garlic, diced or minced
    1½ Large White Onion, diced
    28 oz can diced tomatoes
    50 oz tomato sauce
    12 oz tomato paste
    ¼ cup dried oregano
    2 Tbsp dried marjoram
    1-2 Tbsp salt (to taste, depends on your italian sausage)
    2 Tbsp parsley flakes

    Cheese:
    24 oz + 16 oz cottage cheese
    24 oz + 16 oz ricotta cheese
    32 oz (2 bricks) mozzarella cheese, grated
    6 oz parmesan cheese wedge, grated
    6 oz romano cheese wedge, grated

    Noodles:
    About 24 standard sized lasagna noodles.
    Cook them to just al-dente. (firm, not soft)

    Cooking
    1. Throw the beef and the sausage into a pot, and brown it. Drain fat (though there shouldn't be much if at all.)
    2. Add diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, onion, garlic, tomato paste. Stir together thoroughly and get it simmering.
    3. Once simmering, add the oregano, marjoram, salt, and parsley.
    4. Let this simmer for at least one hour. You want it to be about the consistence of spaghetti sauce, but no thicker. If it gets too thick, add a bit of water.
    5. While your sauce is simmering is a good time to grate cheese and cook the noodles.

    Note: While I keep track of larger materials, I do not keep track of how I spice food. I spice everything by taste. So all the above amounts are my best guess at estimates.

    Layering
    In order:
    Layer 1: Noodles, Sauce, Mozzarella, Cottage, Ricotta,
    Layer 2: Noodles, Sauce, Mozzarella, Cottage, Ricotta,
    Layer 3:Noodles, Sauce, Mozzarella, Cottage, Ricotta,
    Top: Sauce, Parmesan, Romano

    Noodles: Just make a layer. Do not overlap the noodles, just lay them side by side. Cut them down if necessary.
    Sauce: Each layer is about 10-12 wooden spoonfuls of sauce. You just want a light spread on each layer. You want to completely cover the noodles, but keep the layer thin. Make sure you get the corners. Using the spoon to spread the sauce can be very helpful.
    Cheeses: In general, you want to have the meatsauce mostly covered with the cheeses. However distribution is up to you.
    Mozzarella: A handful or two per layer. You do not need to completely cover the meatsauce. Make sure it's spread evening. Get the corners!
    Cottage/Ricotta: A little more difficult to deal with. I usually use my hands and "dribble" it out over the pan.
    Top: It can be useful to use a spoon to spread the sauce over the top for an even layer. Mix the Parmesan and Romano together. Make sure there is a complete coat over the top of the lasagna.

    Bake in the over at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. If this was refrigerated beforehand, increase it to 60 minutes. If frozen, let it thaw first.

    This is my first attempt at transcribing a recipe that's half in my head, so point out if there's anything that is unclear.

    I'm also interested in seeing @nicopernicus's recipe since it sounds like his will be quite different.

    Syphyre on
    Steam ID - Syphyreal --- 3DS Friend Code: 2723-9387-1002
  • VivixenneVivixenne aDAWRable! Registered User regular
    Blake T wrote:
    Viv and I usually have one person eat the thigh and drumstick and the other gets the breast and wing.

    Then the next day we swap.

    As I carve I just eat the butt and oyster as I carve.

    but... but...

    I like the oyster too! :(

  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    Roast a chicken then!

  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Blake T wrote: »
    Roast a chicken then!

    :^:
    to the chef go the spoils

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    roasting a chicken is mighty hard lemme tell ya

    you gotta turn the oven on

    and put both salt AND pepper on that thing


    that shit ain't easy

    STEAM
    Spoiler:
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    doesn't matter
    you cooked the chicken, you get the oysters

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    I love roasted chickens because buying a whole chicken is both tastier AND cheaper than buying separate pieces

    Literally better than the sum of its parts

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  • cadmunkycadmunky One hand on the bottle, The other a shaking fist.Registered User regular
    But...

    Butt.....

    The chicken is the sum of its parts.

    Ahhhh whiskey.....

    Dunno what she's cooking, but it smells awesome.

    Chikkin titties.

    5955603848_aed2690084.jpg
    "Think of it as Evolution in Action"
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I like getting thighs on the bone. Pull the skin off, toss 'em in some marinade (like the inasal marinade I make all the time) for 12-24 hours, and then grill/broil 'em up and that's some real good eatin'. And it's both cheaper and better tasting than deboned thighs.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • SyphyreSyphyre A Dangerous Pastime Registered User regular
    Chicken thighs make for some delicious Caldo.

    Steam ID - Syphyreal --- 3DS Friend Code: 2723-9387-1002
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Reginald wrote: »
    Also, I made some great ropa vieja and tostones on Sunday. For an accompaniment I made mojo, it is so simple and so good. Total cuban style.

    4 large cloves garlic, peeled
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    3/4 tsp coarse salt
    1 bunch cilantro
    1/2 - 1 cup virgin Spanish olive oil
    4-5 Tbsp (approximately) water (add a little and save like 2 tbsp if needed to blend)
    Spanish sherry vinegar to taste (a dash!)

    Prep the ingredients, blend together, and refrigerate. Eat every day and offend others with your body odor.

    Cilantro is great but not really a Cuban thing

    @Stale have you ever used a caja china

    “Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”
    Site | The Miami Grindstone | Twitter | Dropbox
  • KetarKetar Duke of Weaseltown Like an agile peacock!Registered User regular
    Quoth wrote: »
    Reginald wrote: »
    Also, I made some great ropa vieja and tostones on Sunday. For an accompaniment I made mojo, it is so simple and so good. Total cuban style.

    4 large cloves garlic, peeled
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    3/4 tsp coarse salt
    1 bunch cilantro
    1/2 - 1 cup virgin Spanish olive oil
    4-5 Tbsp (approximately) water (add a little and save like 2 tbsp if needed to blend)
    Spanish sherry vinegar to taste (a dash!)

    Prep the ingredients, blend together, and refrigerate. Eat every day and offend others with your body odor.

    Cilantro is great but not really a Cuban thing.

    That's not really true these days. I see cilantro used at Cuban restaurants in Chicago, and googling comes up with tons of Cuban recipes using cilantro, as well as a section from a Cuban cookbook in which the Cuban authors address that very notion and dismiss it.

  • QuantumTurkQuantumTurk Registered User regular
    Stale, I'm adding Mizuna to my list of things to try, had to wiki it to find out what it was. Seeing you live around ATL too, do you know what the secret to the Dekalb world farmers market is? Their prices on so many things are mad cheap, and the selection is wonderful, and I can yell at a tiny old woman that yes I want my fishes head still attached, but I suspect I am supporting a drug front and human trafficking ring. Confirm/Deny

  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Ketar wrote: »
    Quoth wrote: »
    Reginald wrote: »
    Also, I made some great ropa vieja and tostones on Sunday. For an accompaniment I made mojo, it is so simple and so good. Total cuban style.

    4 large cloves garlic, peeled
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    3/4 tsp coarse salt
    1 bunch cilantro
    1/2 - 1 cup virgin Spanish olive oil
    4-5 Tbsp (approximately) water (add a little and save like 2 tbsp if needed to blend)
    Spanish sherry vinegar to taste (a dash!)

    Prep the ingredients, blend together, and refrigerate. Eat every day and offend others with your body odor.

    Cilantro is great but not really a Cuban thing.

    That's not really true these days. I see cilantro used at Cuban restaurants in Chicago, and googling comes up with tons of Cuban recipes using cilantro, as well as a section from a Cuban cookbook in which the Cuban authors address that very notion and dismiss it.

    Um, ok

    I'll tell my abuela she's been making mojo wrong I guess

    “Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”
    Site | The Miami Grindstone | Twitter | Dropbox
  • nevilleneville The Worst Gay (Seriously. The Worst!)Registered User regular
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    nevillexmassig1.png
  • FyndirFyndir Registered User regular
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

  • nevilleneville The Worst Gay (Seriously. The Worst!)Registered User regular
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

    Just the cheesecake recipe.
    I will share others.

    nevillexmassig1.png
  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    Neville teach me how to be so sweet.

  • FyndirFyndir Registered User regular
    neville wrote:
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

    Just the cheesecake recipe.
    I will share others.

    One day I will have your cheesecake.

    One day.

  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Quoth wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    Quoth wrote: »
    Reginald wrote: »
    Also, I made some great ropa vieja and tostones on Sunday. For an accompaniment I made mojo, it is so simple and so good. Total cuban style.

    4 large cloves garlic, peeled
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    3/4 tsp coarse salt
    1 bunch cilantro
    1/2 - 1 cup virgin Spanish olive oil
    4-5 Tbsp (approximately) water (add a little and save like 2 tbsp if needed to blend)
    Spanish sherry vinegar to taste (a dash!)

    Prep the ingredients, blend together, and refrigerate. Eat every day and offend others with your body odor.

    Cilantro is great but not really a Cuban thing.

    That's not really true these days. I see cilantro used at Cuban restaurants in Chicago, and googling comes up with tons of Cuban recipes using cilantro, as well as a section from a Cuban cookbook in which the Cuban authors address that very notion and dismiss it.

    Um, ok

    I'll tell my abuela she's been making mojo wrong I guess

    I get what you're saying, but cilantro goes great with a lot of Cuban dishes whether it's traditional or not. There's always going to be some modification and adjustment to locally available ingredients and preferences as a region's cuisine travels to other areas. And of course, that's exactly how we got Cuban cuisine in the first place.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Druhim wrote: »
    Quoth wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    Quoth wrote: »
    Reginald wrote: »
    Also, I made some great ropa vieja and tostones on Sunday. For an accompaniment I made mojo, it is so simple and so good. Total cuban style.

    4 large cloves garlic, peeled
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    3/4 tsp coarse salt
    1 bunch cilantro
    1/2 - 1 cup virgin Spanish olive oil
    4-5 Tbsp (approximately) water (add a little and save like 2 tbsp if needed to blend)
    Spanish sherry vinegar to taste (a dash!)

    Prep the ingredients, blend together, and refrigerate. Eat every day and offend others with your body odor.

    Cilantro is great but not really a Cuban thing.

    That's not really true these days. I see cilantro used at Cuban restaurants in Chicago, and googling comes up with tons of Cuban recipes using cilantro, as well as a section from a Cuban cookbook in which the Cuban authors address that very notion and dismiss it.

    Um, ok

    I'll tell my abuela she's been making mojo wrong I guess

    I get what you're saying, but cilantro goes great with a lot of Cuban dishes whether it's traditional or not. There's always going to be some modification and adjustment to locally available ingredients and preferences as a region's cuisine travels to other areas. And of course, that's exactly how we got Cuban cuisine in the first place.

    I do not disagree! I was just noting that in a "Cuban style" recipe, that ingredient, while yummy, isn't really Cuban style

    That would be like saying, I dunno... Use jerk seasoning in a Mexican style taco recipe

    Probably delicious, not really Mexican

    “Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”
    Site | The Miami Grindstone | Twitter | Dropbox
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Traditional is probably the word I should have used from the start

    Let us not fight, for verily, cilantro is delicious and I am down to try it when next I make mojo

    “Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”
    Site | The Miami Grindstone | Twitter | Dropbox
  • nevilleneville The Worst Gay (Seriously. The Worst!)Registered User regular
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

    Just the cheesecake recipe.
    I will share others.

    One day I will have your cheesecake.

    One day.
    you know it ;)

    nevillexmassig1.png
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Quoth wrote: »
    Traditional is probably the word I should have used from the start

    Let us not fight, for verily, cilantro is delicious and I am down to try it when next I make mojo

    Oh for sure. When I'm making a dish I haven't made before, I try to go as authentic as I can and see how it comes out. Sometimes (for my tastes of course, not speaking for anyone else) I find that going authentic is worth it. Like using imported fish sauce for cooking thai dishes instead of getting some weakass domestic brand, or leaving it out/substituting. But sometimes I find that trying to go authentic is such a pain in the ass that it's better to use something similar that's local and fresh. Or that I just don't like the authentic ingredient. One good example is a really good chana masala recipe I tried recently. Traditionally, amchoor (dried and powdered green mango) is used as a souring agent in many Indian dishes. But when I tried using amchoor instead of lemon juice, neither of us cared for the taste. It wasn't as sour as lemon juice and it left an aftertaste/mouth feel that we found unpleasantly soapy. So in that case I'm totally just going to use lemon juice because we've tried the traditional ingredient and didn't like it.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • Lost SalientLost Salient Z is for Zillah who drank too much ginRegistered User regular
    neville wrote: »
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

    Just the cheesecake recipe.
    I will share others.

    Give me dessert recipes, nevs! I will appreciate them! I just tend to run more to the lines of determining what to make based on finding a delicious recipe, rather than deciding what I want to make and then needing to find a recipe.

    Speaking of desserts.

    Finally did that belated black forest.
    Spoiler:

    I call this piece Seconds From Disaster: Taking Photos of Yourself Holding Cakes

    I used some gelatin in the whipped cream frosting (along with brandy and vanilla) to make sure it set up and would survive the probably 30-minute taxi drive it'll be undergoing tonight, but that made frosting and smoothing out the sides of the cake sort of a pain in the ass. If anyone has any frosting advice I'd take it.

    QuW2glN.jpg"Sandra's favourite movie is escape from new York because she cries when magpie and brain die because they will never be together." i read books sometimes
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    True story: my husband doesn't really like tahini in his hummus

    He is wrong but such is life

    But yeah, people making mojo for the first time may want to opt for a cilantro-free version for the traditional experience, or may just love cilantro and go for that

    Speaking of curry, now I want some

    “Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”
    Site | The Miami Grindstone | Twitter | Dropbox
  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    That reminds me.

    I need to buy tahini.

  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    You look so fucking happy about that cake Sandra.

  • FyndirFyndir Registered User regular
    neville wrote:
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    Fyndir wrote: »
    neville wrote:
    we need more people asking for dessert recipes!

    Don't you flatly refuse to share your best ones, or is it just the cheesecake that's secret?

    Just the cheesecake recipe.
    I will share others.

    One day I will have your cheesecake.

    One day.
    you know it ;)

    For real though, I should probably stay away from your dessert recipes until I've gotten under my goal weight for surgery, then you can tell me how to make something really nice as a reward for myself.

This discussion has been closed.