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A Thread About Movies

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Posts

  • TexiKenTexiKen Was it Kierkegaard or Dick Van Patten who said, Registered User regular
    Watched Outrage tonight, a Beat Takeshi movie about the Yakuza.

    Beyond showing the relentless nature of an underworld where the most ruthless schemers are the ones that get to the top, and some frankly shocking scenes of violence, Outrage also succeeded pretty handily in making me think it was shot in the early nineties, when in fact it's from 2010. Nothing about it looks particularly 'new' or contemporary.

    So, two thirds of the way through the movie there's a scene in a noodle shop and some guy walks into the scene with a DS Lite with him, it was a serious surprise.

    It did drag a little bit towards the end when it seemed to become a tableau of who's killing who, but watching the exchanges of Yakuza factions where they continually to meet in order to smooth things over but always aggravate their problems because either a) the old ways don't work anymore or b) someone involved in the peacemaking process has his own stake in the disorder continuing is pretty gripping. I'll never hear the phrase "This is only a formality" the same way again.

    I mentioned something similar back in the previous thread about Outrage, how it basically is standard for a Takeshi film, and it feels like it gets praised or a pass because it's by someone who was groundbreaking in the past (though I still think Sonatine was very overrated). It has its moments but it's nothing new, and compared to say Korean crime films, it needed to bring something new to the table.

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  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    KalTorak wrote: »
    What's so bad about that Jackman pic?

    Oh, nothing at all. It looks pretty good, actually.

    It's just that Les Mis, the stage show, is notoriously shiny and clean for a story about poverty, prostitution, and bloody rebellion.


    And then Hugh Jackman shows up looking like he just barbecued a live infant.

  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    Ah I see. Is that coming out this year? Seems like 2011's lukewarm run was just the wind-up for a ton of ambitious projects this year.

  • Sangheili91Sangheili91 Registered User regular
    I just got back from John Carter. I didn't hate it, but I didn't like it, either. It was a whole lot of sound and fury signifying nothing, and I lost interest fairly quickly. The ending redeemed it somewhat, but I still can't in good conscious recommend it.

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  • NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action Still AwesomeRegistered User regular
    Outrage... That reminds me of my Japanese class back in high school where we watched "Anti Extortion Woman". Interesting film.
    Basically its about a woman that is hired to help companies stand up to yakuza intimidation/extortion tactics.
    I can type up more about it when I'm not on my phone.

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  • LavaKnightLavaKnight Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Edd wrote: »
    So, Midnight In Paris. I........I think I love this movie. I'm not sure what people here think of it, and I probably need more time to properly digest it, but having just finished it like 5 minutes ago I think it might be one of the most charming movies I've ever seen.

    I think it's easy to take a run at it for being so transparently a Woody Allen product, but that's really not much of a criticism in and of itself. Granted some of its characters are fairly stock, but I give it credit for being a really sincere effort at magical realism. And everyone from the lost generation is very well cast.

    Yeah, I loved the sincerity of the film the most, considering the magic involved. I think this was why I loved it so much as well.

    And speaking of sincerity, it's too bad about John Carter. My dad was really excited to see it because he read all of those types of Sci-Fi back in their heyday when he was a kid. I was hopeful that if would live up the expectations of 40+ years after listening to the director's Filmspotting interview. I hope my dad ended up liking it.

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  • LavaKnightLavaKnight Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Whoops, phone posting problem. Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.

    LavaKnight on
  • VariableVariable Ted Hitler Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    are they doing a musical of les mis? I know hathaway and jackman can sing

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  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Registered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote:
    but seriously, Russell Crowe as Javert is a pretty boss idea

    Russell Crowe is Australian and looks a lot like Phillip Quast* who played Javert in the Australian productions of Les Mis.

    My hometown had Phillip Quast's brother, who also looks like Phillip Quast and Russell Crowe play Javert.

    True story.

    *Compare Master and Commander with Ultraviolet (the UK tv series) in particular.

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  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    Variable wrote: »
    are they doing a musical of les mis? I know hathaway and jackman can sing

    Yes, this film is the first cinematic production of the stage show. All singing and dancing. And suicides.

  • Look Out it's Sabs!Look Out it's Sabs! Registered User regular
    So, Midnight In Paris. I........I think I love this movie. I'm not sure what people here think of it, and I probably need more time to properly digest it, but having just finished it like 5 minutes ago I think it might be one of the most charming movies I've ever seen.

    I got dragged into seeing that movie by a girl and had no idea what the movie was even about.

    Absolutely loved it, just so charming. A week after that I picked up my first F. Scott Fitzgerald book :P

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  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Edd wrote: »
    I don't think this was posted in the previous thread, and some of you guys might find this interesting.

    It's an "insider" run-down of John Carter's behind the scenes death spiral..

    A bit sad, if true. The dangers of being an auteur. Once in a while, studios are right.

    Stanton wasn't ready for this. He needed at least to complete one live action film before shooting John Carter to avoid learning on the job for a big project like Carter. That and he needed to learn how the live action film shoots were different from animated films.

    I sympathize with the Disney marketing people who were sabotaged by him.

    Harry Dresden on
  • RiusRius Registered User regular
    Two of my favorite movies ever; Bulworth and Bowfinger. And yet somehow I still don't have them on dvd.

  • Linespider5Linespider5 You could have just sent a thank you note. Registered User regular
    TexiKen wrote: »
    Watched Outrage tonight, a Beat Takeshi movie about the Yakuza.

    Beyond showing the relentless nature of an underworld where the most ruthless schemers are the ones that get to the top, and some frankly shocking scenes of violence, Outrage also succeeded pretty handily in making me think it was shot in the early nineties, when in fact it's from 2010. Nothing about it looks particularly 'new' or contemporary.

    So, two thirds of the way through the movie there's a scene in a noodle shop and some guy walks into the scene with a DS Lite with him, it was a serious surprise.

    It did drag a little bit towards the end when it seemed to become a tableau of who's killing who, but watching the exchanges of Yakuza factions where they continually to meet in order to smooth things over but always aggravate their problems because either a) the old ways don't work anymore or b) someone involved in the peacemaking process has his own stake in the disorder continuing is pretty gripping. I'll never hear the phrase "This is only a formality" the same way again.

    I mentioned something similar back in the previous thread about Outrage, how it basically is standard for a Takeshi film, and it feels like it gets praised or a pass because it's by someone who was groundbreaking in the past (though I still think Sonatine was very overrated). It has its moments but it's nothing new, and compared to say Korean crime films, it needed to bring something new to the table.

    You sound like one who has been through the subgenre quite a bit.

    Any recommendations?

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  • EddEdd Registered User regular
    I sympathize with the Disney marketing people who were sabotaged by him.

    It's a pretty rare set of circumstance when someone can put a sentence like that together and mean it.

  • TexiKenTexiKen Was it Kierkegaard or Dick Van Patten who said, Registered User regular
    TexiKen wrote: »
    Watched Outrage tonight, a Beat Takeshi movie about the Yakuza.

    Beyond showing the relentless nature of an underworld where the most ruthless schemers are the ones that get to the top, and some frankly shocking scenes of violence, Outrage also succeeded pretty handily in making me think it was shot in the early nineties, when in fact it's from 2010. Nothing about it looks particularly 'new' or contemporary.

    So, two thirds of the way through the movie there's a scene in a noodle shop and some guy walks into the scene with a DS Lite with him, it was a serious surprise.

    It did drag a little bit towards the end when it seemed to become a tableau of who's killing who, but watching the exchanges of Yakuza factions where they continually to meet in order to smooth things over but always aggravate their problems because either a) the old ways don't work anymore or b) someone involved in the peacemaking process has his own stake in the disorder continuing is pretty gripping. I'll never hear the phrase "This is only a formality" the same way again.

    I mentioned something similar back in the previous thread about Outrage, how it basically is standard for a Takeshi film, and it feels like it gets praised or a pass because it's by someone who was groundbreaking in the past (though I still think Sonatine was very overrated). It has its moments but it's nothing new, and compared to say Korean crime films, it needed to bring something new to the table.

    You sound like one who has been through the subgenre quite a bit.

    Any recommendations?

    Absolutely. Most of these are on Netflix instant watch last I checked, and this is just the crime/mafia genre stuff, there's a lot more I can recommend if you want something else:
    Man From Nowhere
    A Better Tomorrow (both the classic Hong Kong film and the new Korean remake)
    Righteous Ties
    The Unjust
    No Mercy
    Cruel Winter Blues (this is what Sonatine should have been, imo)
    The Chaser
    Guns and Talks (probably the best foreign film I've seen, more a comedy but it's about assassins and gangs)
    Crows Zero (more about student gangs but along the same lines)

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  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck you must go on i cant go on ill go onRegistered User regular
    wow the story of john carter is sad :(((

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  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    RE: Hunger Games -
    Spoiler:

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  • pirateluigipirateluigi Registered User regular
    Stanton wasn't ready for this. He needed at least to complete one live action film before shooting John Carter to avoid learning on the job for a big project like Carter. That and he needed to learn how the live action film shoots were different from animated films.

    I sympathize with the Disney marketing people who were sabotaged by him.

    The film is good enough though that it should have been a hit. Avatar was huge and it wasn't significantly better. But the marketing, as discussed, was terrible. Until I read this thread, I had no idea Stanton was involved. My friends don't even know who Andrew Stanton is. But, if the marketing had mentioned points like:
    -The first live action film from the writer and director of Wall-E and Finding Nemo
    -Based on the novel that inspired Star Wars, Star Trek, Avatar, and pretty much every sci-fi movie ever
    -Based on a novel by the writer of Tarzan
    -A film almost 100 years in the making

    That would have gotten people interested in it. Stanton really wanted to believe that everyone would want to see a John Carter movie, but no one even knew who John Carter was.

    It really is a shame, too. It's going to make the execs reluctant to give Stanton another shot at live action, even though he has some talent there.

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  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Stanton wasn't ready for this. He needed at least to complete one live action film before shooting John Carter to avoid learning on the job for a big project like Carter. That and he needed to learn how the live action film shoots were different from animated films.

    I sympathize with the Disney marketing people who were sabotaged by him.

    The film is good enough though that it should have been a hit. Avatar was huge and it wasn't significantly better. But the marketing, as discussed, was terrible. Until I read this thread, I had no idea Stanton was involved. My friends don't even know who Andrew Stanton is. But, if the marketing had mentioned points like:
    -The first live action film from the writer and director of Wall-E and Finding Nemo
    -Based on the novel that inspired Star Wars, Star Trek, Avatar, and pretty much every sci-fi movie ever
    -Based on a novel by the writer of Tarzan
    -A film almost 100 years in the making

    That would have gotten people interested in it. Stanton really wanted to believe that everyone would want to see a John Carter movie, but no one even knew who John Carter was.

    It really is a shame, too. It's going to make the execs reluctant to give Stanton another shot at live action, even though he has some talent there.

    That makes it all the more tragic.

    Maybe having less power on his new live action project might improve his craft (especially when preparing footage for trailers) and make any trailers for those projects better. Of course, that will only work if he admits to his mistakes on John Carter.

    edit: I didn't know he directed Little Nemo or Wall-E until I read that article.

    Harry Dresden on
  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    It's a weird parallel that Brad Bird, another Pixar heavyweight, had sort of the opposite situation. Everyone really did know about MI but there was a relatively negative image of it due to the last few movies and he managed to turn it around. I also remember there being a fair amount of press about Bird making the jump from animation to live action, while the Stanton stuff seems to have been largely buried.

  • AtomikaAtomika Hypercritical Queen Bitch of Cinema Registered User regular
    KalTorak wrote: »
    It's a weird parallel that Brad Bird, another Pixar heavyweight, had sort of the opposite situation. Everyone really did know about MI but there was a relatively negative image of it due to the last few movies and he managed to turn it around. I also remember there being a fair amount of press about Bird making the jump from animation to live action, while the Stanton stuff seems to have been largely buried.

    In fairness, John Carter was much more ambitious than MI4. MI4 just had to not suck totally. John Carter had to be a gigantic smash.


    A real shame, too. There was a lot of potential in John Carter, but way too many failures of basic storytelling fundamentals to really become the hit it needed to be.

  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited March 2012
    Apothe0sis wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote:
    but seriously, Russell Crowe as Javert is a pretty boss idea

    Russell Crowe is Australian and looks a lot like Phillip Quast* who played Javert in the Australian productions of Les Mis.

    My hometown had Phillip Quast's brother, who also looks like Phillip Quast and Russell Crowe play Javert.

    True story.

    *Compare Master and Commander with Ultraviolet (the UK tv series) in particular.

    oh wow, I remember Ultraviolet. Good show.

    edit: and you're right, there is definitely a resemblance there.

    Jacobkosh on
  • BogartBogart Registered User regular
    New instant watch post about Sonatine, coincidentally enough, can be found here.

  • NODeNODe Registered User
    Spoiler:

    It's especially depressing that this is essentially Stanton's dream movie and he might be directly responsible for scuttling it and any sequels.

    I do think that the lack of a fervently evangelical fan base for the source material might have given the whole project a steeper hill to climb than you might think though.

    I still think that Taylor Kitsch is a bit of a plank in the lead role. Purefoy out-charisma's him with no discernible effort in the very brief "hostage" scene. That obviously wouldn't have stopped this movie from being a success though.

  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Finally got around to seeing Tin Tin. That was as close to Indiana Jones (Yes, I know it was a huge influence on Indiana Jones) as Spielberg has been in a while. It was a bit...intense. I felt like there was little to no time to breath between action sequences.

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  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    NODe wrote: »
    Spoiler:

    It's especially depressing that this is essentially Stanton's dream movie and he might be directly responsible for scuttling it and any sequels.

    For a while. Eventually someone will make a new version, since the film has given enough publicity to the franchise to get someone's attention. That said, it'll be a decade before that starts being a possibility.
    I do think that the lack of a fervently evangelical fan base for the source material might have given the whole project a steeper hill to climb than you might think though.

    Yes, that was one of its biggest hurdles. The fanbase was so tiny it may as well have not existed at all.
    I still think that Taylor Kitsch is a bit of a plank in the lead role. Purefoy out-charisma's him with no discernible effort in the very brief "hostage" scene. That obviously wouldn't have stopped this movie from being a success though.

    Can't say whether Kitsch was right in the role since I haven't seen the film yet. He was good in X-men Origins: Wolverine. John Carter needed an A-lister but due to the film's expensive budget they couldn't afford one so they got him instead.

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  • VariableVariable Ted Hitler Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    Variable wrote: »
    are they doing a musical of les mis? I know hathaway and jackman can sing

    Yes, this film is the first cinematic production of the stage show. All singing and dancing. And suicides.

    fuck yesssssssssssssss

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  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    Oh, and if you like Beat Takeshi/Kitano stuff, I can't recommend Kikujiro enough. It's a must see.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    One thing about The King's Speech:

    Maybe I'm wrong but I felt like the movie wanted me to agree with the royal family when they were like "Edward is crying when his father died instead of keeping a stiff upper lip? What an outrage!" and "Edward is marrying someone who had been married before? How dare he! Kick him off the throne!" But I don't have a problem with someone expressing grief or marrying the person he loves.

    (At one point Edward's brother is like "you can't marry a divorcee - you're the head of the Church of England!" For gosh sakes, the reason the Church of England exists is because Henry VIII - the first Supreme Head of the church - wanted to divorce/execute a bunch of women and the Catholic church wouldn't let him.)

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  • BogartBogart Registered User regular
    It's about how self indulgent Edward is. Breaking down rather than keeping a stiff upper lip, marrying who he likes rather than who he should, etc.

    Also, he was an utter twat in real life so fuck him right in the eye. Mrs Simpson did the country a massive favour by banging him and getting him off the throne for WWII.

  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    I guess the British monarchy can be out of touch sometimes. Go watch The Queen.

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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    wandering wrote: »
    One thing about The King's Speech:

    Maybe I'm wrong but I felt like the movie wanted me to agree with the royal family when they were like "Edward is crying when his father died instead of keeping a stiff upper lip? What an outrage!" and "Edward is marrying someone who had been married before? How dare he! Kick him off the throne!" But I don't have a problem with someone expressing grief or marrying the person he loves.

    (At one point Edward's brother is like "you can't marry a divorcee - you're the head of the Church of England!" For gosh sakes, the reason the Church of England exists is because Henry VIII - the first Supreme Head of the church - wanted to divorce/execute a bunch of women and the Catholic church wouldn't let him.)

    I think, like many of the scenes with George and the speech therapist, you are supposed to understand it in context.

    The things Edward does aren't so bad out of context, but in context it's part of a pattern of selfish behavior. They don't just show him giving up the throne or crying at a funeral, they show him smacking down George when George confronts him about doing his job and such too.

  • TehSpectreTehSpectre @PixelateJake on TwitterRegistered User regular
    Esh wrote: »
    Oh, and if you like Beat Takeshi/Kitano stuff, I can't recommend Kikujiro enough. It's a must see.
    My favorite is his take on Zaitoichi.



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  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    TehSpectre wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    Oh, and if you like Beat Takeshi/Kitano stuff, I can't recommend Kikujiro enough. It's a must see.
    My favorite is his take on Zaitoichi.



    Saw it at the Seattle International Film Festival years ago. Love the...
    Spoiler:

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • ZampanovZampanov You May Not Go Home Until Tonight Has Been MagicalRegistered User regular
    wait... was I the only one who liked the teaser trailer they crap on in that article? The only one who thought that trailer made it look interesting, and the rest of them made it look like Prince of Persia's Episode 2 Attack of the Clones?

    yikes, I feel pretty disconnected from that article

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  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    that movie is filled with great random dance/tap/music numbers

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  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    Speaking of, does anyone feel like The Good, the Bad, and the Weird wasn't as good as it was made out to be? I thought it was WAY too long as well. I had the same feeling about The Host. Maybe it's a Korean thing, though I don't feel like any of the revenge trilogy was dragged out (Old Boy and the two Vengeance films).

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu ___________PIGEON _________San Diego, CA Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    I thought The Good, The Bad, and The Weird was stupendous, and I loved the length: any time I'm enjoying a movie as much as that one, I'm always happy for it to drag on longer and longer, because, hey, I'm having fun! The soundtrack has an infectious energy, the action sequences are exciting and also packed with little touches of humor, the story's got enough pathos to keep on rolling, and I think the bad guy turned me gay.

    I mean seriously, I can't pick a favorite track, they're all just so great:

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  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    I thought The Good, The Bad, and The Weird was stupendous, and I loved the length: any time I'm enjoying a movie as much as that one, I'm always happy for it to drag on longer and longer, because, hey, I'm having fun! The soundtrack has an infectious energy, the action sequences are exciting and also packed with little touches of humor, the story's got enough pathos to keep on rolling, and I think the bad guy turned me gay.

    I mean seriously, I can't pick a favorite track, they're all just so great:

    By all means, I should've loved it, but I just didn't. I mean, it wasn't terrible, but it did nothing for me. I mean, I loved Sukiyaki Western Django and the more traditional spaghetti westerns, so you'd think I'd be into this one.

    I know what you mean by the length though. It probably really stuck out to me seeing as I wasn't that into the film.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
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