Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Rise of the Guardians: Alec Baldwin is Russian Mafia Santa Claus

2

Posts

  • Spectre-xSpectre-x Registered User regular
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!

    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    Sig_link_image.jpg
  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver Registered User, ClubPA regular
    So it's a holiday version of the avengers

    Steam name: munkus_beaver
    Blizzard thing: munkus#1952
    Nintendo ID (3DS thinger): munkusbeaver
    Please give to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: http://www.ccfa.org/
    Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but it dies in the process.
  • BlankzillaBlankzilla The Year 198X Being Xtreme to the MaxxRegistered User regular
    Why do you think I made both threads, Munkus

    Team-up films are what sustain me

    without them, I wither away

  • Skull ManSkull Man Registered User regular
    monsters inc is not a story about the wonders of childhood

    it is mostly a story about the oil industry

  • Skull ManSkull Man Registered User regular
    Blankzilla wrote: »
    Why do you think I made both threads, Munkus

    Team-up films are what sustain me

    without them, I wither away

    as upposed to team-up games, which you let wither away

  • Skull ManSkull Man Registered User regular
    that came off as meaner than I intended

  • BlankzillaBlankzilla The Year 198X Being Xtreme to the MaxxRegistered User regular
    Skull Man wrote: »
    Blankzilla wrote: »
    Why do you think I made both threads, Munkus

    Team-up films are what sustain me

    without them, I wither away

    as upposed to team-up games, which you let wither away
    This is an accurate, if hurtful, assessment

  • EdcrabEdcrab Registered User
    Skull Man wrote: »
    that came off as meaner than I intended

    Said Skull Man, inhaling deeply of the scorched flesh left in his wake

    cBY55.gifbmJsl.png
  • The GeekThe Geek Oh-Two Crew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Speaking of Alec Baldwin, I heard an spot on NPR the other morning where he was telling people to not give money to NPR during their fund drive. It was pretty much in character as Jack Donaghy, but he introduced himself as Alec.

    zappsigsm.jpg
    Amazon wish list | Please check out my wife's blog and jewelry store.
  • MrDapperMrDapper We're here. RUNRegistered User regular
    The Geek wrote: »
    Speaking of Alec Baldwin, I heard an spot on NPR the other morning where he was telling people to not give money to NPR during their fund drive. It was pretty much in character as Jack Donaghy, but he introduced himself as Alec.



    Also this movie looks baller, and one of the storyboard artists from Avatar: TLA worked on it, so sign me up.

  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!
    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    I got what I got from the movie

    if you want to tell me that sorry, no, it isn't real, then that's your business.

    Clearly your reading at the time was different

    which is okay, because stories can mean different things to different people

    So it's not absolutely not in the way I claim. What you are saying is important and a part of it, but it seems to me that the aspect of Hiccup's personality that is trusting and open to new ideas leads from his view of the world as a more innocent child than an adult.

  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    Gumpy wrote: »
    I don't know what happened in Dreamworks to make them start doing their own thing

    But its pretty cool

    sherk

    STEAM
    Spoiler:
  • KwoaruKwoaru Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Gumpy wrote: »
    I don't know what happened in Dreamworks to make them start doing their own thing

    But its pretty cool

    sherk

    they've managed to squeeze like 6 movies from that rock, is it out of blood yet?

    newsigtrimmed.jpg
  • YaYaYaYa Rick and Morty forever and ever 100 years! a100timesRickandMorty.comRegistered User regular
    Kwoaru wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Gumpy wrote: »
    I don't know what happened in Dreamworks to make them start doing their own thing

    But its pretty cool

    sherk

    they've managed to squeeze like 6 movies from that rock, is it out of blood yet?

    pretty sure Puss In Boots is getting a sequel, but I might be making that up

  • TurambarTurambar Captain 'Crawler of the Warship XavierRegistered User regular
    Solar, are you indirectly saying that How to Train Your Dragon wasn't the best movie?

    nc_sig_1.png
    Origin: Turamb | Steam: Turambar | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I enjoyed how to train your dragon

    not all that much

    but I enjoyed it

  • TurambarTurambar Captain 'Crawler of the Warship XavierRegistered User regular
    It's about dragons!
    And vikings!

    It's the Skyrim of animated movies

    nc_sig_1.png
    Origin: Turamb | Steam: Turambar | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar
  • ArtreusArtreus Hey kids, want some drugs?Registered User regular
    Well some people have a sickness inside and do not like Skyrim

    http://atlanticus.tumblr.com/ PSN: Atlanticus 3DS: 1590-4692-3954 Steam: Artreus
  • AntimatterAntimatter if you want to talk to me look elsewhere.Registered User regular
    I like How To Train Your Dragon lots

    partially because it's actually aesthetically appealing to me and sufficiently light hearted

  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I have never played Skyrim but I have seen a few vids on youtube and the like

    it looks pretty

    and I can understand why others would want to play it

    not really grabbed myself, though

  • TurambarTurambar Captain 'Crawler of the Warship XavierRegistered User regular
    I thought you were a dragonbro

    nc_sig_1.png
    Origin: Turamb | Steam: Turambar | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I love dragons

    but I don't unequivocally love anything just because it has dragons in it

    shit just look at Eragon

  • TurambarTurambar Captain 'Crawler of the Warship XavierRegistered User regular
    Yes, but How to train your dragon and Skyrim are good

    nc_sig_1.png
    Origin: Turamb | Steam: Turambar | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    in your opinion!

    also I think that how to etc is good

    just not, like

    amazing

  • Spectre-xSpectre-x Registered User regular
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!
    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    I got what I got from the movie

    if you want to tell me that sorry, no, it isn't real, then that's your business.

    Clearly your reading at the time was different

    which is okay, because stories can mean different things to different people

    So it's not absolutely not in the way I claim. What you are saying is important and a part of it, but it seems to me that the aspect of Hiccup's personality that is trusting and open to new ideas leads from his view of the world as a more innocent child than an adult.

    Well again, I'm not saying that the movie contradicts your claims, I'm just saying that it doesn't support them in any way, which is true. You ascribe an innocent, trusting personality to Hiccup because he is a child. That's fine, by all means do so. The movie itself neither supports nor refutes this. Maybe that's just what children in fiction make you think about, and that's fine. But again, the movie's completely neutral on the matter.

    Although actually, since it's a movie and there's nothing in the movie to support your claims, even if there's also nothing in it to oppose them, the very fact that nothing in the movie supports your claims is a pretty decent indicator of the fact that they probably didn't really mean for that to be a thing. If they did, they would've made a point of it. But they didn't. Seriously. They didn't.

    And personally I don't think Hiccup is innocent and trusting at all, and if he is, again, it has nothing to do with his youth and everything with the fact that he is actually thoughtful, observant and somewhat isolated, socially. If Hiccup was innocent (he isn't, really) or trusting (he really isn't) because of his age, the other children would also have to be. But they're not. So it wouldn't be anything to do with his age, but with something unique to him instead.

    I mean, I can sort of see your point, but your examples of his innocence and trusting nature are actually him being observant and thoughtful. And he's not innocent, he's a pessimist with a poor self-image and a strained relationship with his father. He thinks outside the box, yes, but that is a result of him being an outsider. He couldn't conform to the norm, so he had to develop skills and attitudes unique to him to cope with that fact. So while I can sort of see your point, I'm telling you that your point falls apart the moment you subject it to any kind of scrutiny.

    Sig_link_image.jpg
  • TrippyJingTrippyJing Moses supposes his toeses are roses. But Moses supposes erroneously.Registered User regular
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!
    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    I got what I got from the movie

    if you want to tell me that sorry, no, it isn't real, then that's your business.

    Clearly your reading at the time was different

    which is okay, because stories can mean different things to different people

    So it's not absolutely not in the way I claim. What you are saying is important and a part of it, but it seems to me that the aspect of Hiccup's personality that is trusting and open to new ideas leads from his view of the world as a more innocent child than an adult.

    But the other kids were all gung-ho about killing dragons.

    mosesupposes.gif
  • Kevin CristKevin Crist I'll tell you my sins so you can sharpen your knivesRegistered User regular
    So it's a holiday version of the avengers

    Reminded me more of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

    acpRlGW.jpg291.gif
    Steam: Hugo X Poison| Battlenet: SkinnerSweet#1401
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    TrippyJing wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!
    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    I got what I got from the movie

    if you want to tell me that sorry, no, it isn't real, then that's your business.

    Clearly your reading at the time was different

    which is okay, because stories can mean different things to different people

    So it's not absolutely not in the way I claim. What you are saying is important and a part of it, but it seems to me that the aspect of Hiccup's personality that is trusting and open to new ideas leads from his view of the world as a more innocent child than an adult.

    But the other kids were all gung-ho about killing dragons.

    Those kids all wanted to be adults! They were emulating their elders!

  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    in that only a child could be so trusting as to accept the idea of the Dragons as allies and friends, not enemies

    That had nothing to do with Hiccup being a child or particularly trusting and everything to do with him being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic.

    I dunno

    Correct!
    Solar wrote: »
    there is often an element in stories about children being unusually thoughtful, observant and empathetic

    generally it's the empathetic and thoughtful parts which are linked to the idealism of youth

    but anyway, it did seem to me when I watched How To Train Your Dragon that it was certainly a story about children and their nature and the relationship they have with adults and that included elements of children being more naive and willing to trust than adults. If we consider that Hiccup was unable to kill his dragon because he had not yet seen them kill enough of his friends to destroy any empathy for them, then his youth does factor in.

    Again, no. Hiccup's youth is most important to the plot in the sense that he is of an age where any conflict between him and his father takes up most of his life. This is a pretty big thing, admittedly, but still, it has nothing to do with what you're talking about. His willingness to trust had nothing whatsoever to do with his age and everything with his own role as an outsider, an anomaly in an environment that rewards everything he is not and shakes its head at everything he is. Hiccup himself tells Astrid as much.

    So yeah, Hiccup's youth may be important to the story, but absolutely not in the way you claim. The movie does not necessarily contradict you, as far as I can remember, but it absolutely doesn't support your interpretation, either.

    I got what I got from the movie

    if you want to tell me that sorry, no, it isn't real, then that's your business.

    Clearly your reading at the time was different

    which is okay, because stories can mean different things to different people

    So it's not absolutely not in the way I claim. What you are saying is important and a part of it, but it seems to me that the aspect of Hiccup's personality that is trusting and open to new ideas leads from his view of the world as a more innocent child than an adult.

    Well again, I'm not saying that the movie contradicts your claims, I'm just saying that it doesn't support them in any way, which is true. You ascribe an innocent, trusting personality to Hiccup because he is a child. That's fine, by all means do so. The movie itself neither supports nor refutes this. Maybe that's just what children in fiction make you think about, and that's fine. But again, the movie's completely neutral on the matter.

    Although actually, since it's a movie and there's nothing in the movie to support your claims, even if there's also nothing in it to oppose them, the very fact that nothing in the movie supports your claims is a pretty decent indicator of the fact that they probably didn't really mean for that to be a thing. If they did, they would've made a point of it. But they didn't. Seriously. They didn't.

    And personally I don't think Hiccup is innocent and trusting at all, and if he is, again, it has nothing to do with his youth and everything with the fact that he is actually thoughtful, observant and somewhat isolated, socially. If Hiccup was innocent (he isn't, really) or trusting (he really isn't) because of his age, the other children would also have to be. But they're not. So it wouldn't be anything to do with his age, but with something unique to him instead.

    I mean, I can sort of see your point, but your examples of his innocence and trusting nature are actually him being observant and thoughtful. And he's not innocent, he's a pessimist with a poor self-image and a strained relationship with his father. He thinks outside the box, yes, but that is a result of him being an outsider. He couldn't conform to the norm, so he had to develop skills and attitudes unique to him to cope with that fact. So while I can sort of see your point, I'm telling you that your point falls apart the moment you subject it to any kind of scrutiny.

    okay look

    I like talking about things like this

    I do

    but you make me not like it because you are so incredibly condescending

    I know you try not to be but you still are

    take that how you will

    But I am finished with it

  • Spectre-xSpectre-x Registered User regular
    Yeah, sorry about that. I literally realized something in mid-post and ended up switching gears a bit and yeah the result is unintentional condescension. Whoooooooops!

    You should totally watch the movie again, though. "Childlike innocence and a trusting nature" isn't a thing that holds up to scrutiny in that movie and the it's a really simple, shallow and unoriginal interpretation of things. What they're actually doing in that movie is much fresher and more intelligent. Hey, you might end up liking the movie more if you watch it while trying to ignore the more clichéd interpretation and focus on the other one. Seriously. If you look at the movie as a tale of childlike innocence you miss out on pretty much ninety percent of the cool character stuff.

    Sig_link_image.jpg
  • The GeekThe Geek Oh-Two Crew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2012
    Yeah, I'm not getting at all where this "wonders of childhood" thing is coming from in that movie.

    The Geek on
    zappsigsm.jpg
    Amazon wish list | Please check out my wife's blog and jewelry store.
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Spectre-x wrote: »
    Yeah, sorry about that. I literally realized something in mid-post and ended up switching gears a bit and yeah the result is unintentional condescension. Whoooooooops!

    You should totally watch the movie again, though. "Childlike innocence and a trusting nature" isn't a thing that holds up to scrutiny in that movie and the it's a really simple, shallow and unoriginal interpretation of things. What they're actually doing in that movie is much fresher and more intelligent. Hey, you might end up liking the movie more if you watch it while trying to ignore the more clichéd interpretation and focus on the other one. Seriously. If you look at the movie as a tale of childlike innocence you miss out on pretty much ninety percent of the cool character stuff.

    thanks

    that's nice of you to say, it really is

    Edit: fuck it

    I am really not interested any more

    Solar on
  • Spectre-xSpectre-x Registered User regular
    Well the only way I could see someone interpreting Hiccup getting along with Toothless because of his childlike innocence and trusting nature was if they watched the movie and went "oh, it's a kid going against the grain of society, and that's often because of their childlike innocence, so it's probably that" and then they don't bother to really analyze their relationship after that.

    And that's a shallow way of looking at things. And the whole "childlike innocence" thing is a huge cliché, so it's unoriginal.

    I didn't mean that as an insult. Criticism, sure, but not an insult.

    Sig_link_image.jpg
  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    Blankzilla wrote: »
    Why do you think I made both threads, Munkus

    Team-up films are what sustain me

    without them, I wither away

    Oh shit, you know what a team-up film means.

    Putting-the-team-together sequence.

  • Crimson KingCrimson King th- this is my hole it was made for meRegistered User regular
    spex for fuck's sake bro

    i liked it better when you would just scream at people, at least reading that didn't make me cringe

    anyway i'm not sure what to make of this film. the animation looks really nice in some places and really weird in others. i like all the different elements but in combination i find them somehow jarring

    mostly i wish this was 2d but that's just me

    DS: 4742 - 6001 - 2106 add me to your friend safaris
  • YaYaYaYa Rick and Morty forever and ever 100 years! a100timesRickandMorty.comRegistered User regular
    EVERYONE IS WRONG AND DUMB ABOUT MOVIES FOREVER THE END

  • BigBearBigBear If your life had a face, I would punch it. Registered User regular
    It's a good thing this movie's coming out in late November, it's like it's juuuuust close enough to Christmas for kids to be interested in a movie featuring Alec Baldwin as Russian Mafia Santa Claus. I just hope uptight parents don't bitch too much about the Cutlasses.

    I can just hear them now. "Oooh, that Santa's too violent and scary! IT DOESN'T WOOORK THAT WAAAAAAAAAAY"

  • The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    I feel like I am taking crazy pills but that trailer did zilch to impress me

    also spex come on now

  • MrDapperMrDapper We're here. RUNRegistered User regular
  • Dex DynamoDex Dynamo Registered User regular
    Goddamn, this looks awesome

    I don't know which looks better, this or Wreck-It Ralph

2
Sign In or Register to comment.