Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Diagnosed Prediabetic: Does honest, practical info exist?

BeltaineBeltaine The End of TimeRegistered User regular
edited March 2012 in Help / Advice Forum
So, I got diagnosed, and given a couple prescriptions. Am also really overweight and don't want to end up a full diabetic.

Purchased a book, "The Blood Sugar Solution" by Mark Hyman.

Reading through it, I cannot afford to do what this book wants me to do. The first chapter instructs me to do a questionnaire on the book's website, which then suggests nearly $500 in nutritional supplements for me to buy.

The diet is also beyond my means. I can't afford organic, free-range, gluten-free, etc. etc. everything. I also don't see me being able to logistically carry things like Salmon Salad in Steamed Collard Wraps to work everyday for lunch.

Is there any info out there from someone NOT trying to sell me something? Something practical that someone living on a tight budget can afford?

Trepanning is the art of cutting the skull open to let the gods in.
PSN: Beltaine-77
Steam: beltane77
Gamertag:Beltaine
«13

Posts

  • FantasmaFantasma Registered User regular
    The most basic advice provided by doctors is:

    Diet, that means: no sugar, no fatty meat, and no carbohydrates.

    Exercise, exercise, exercise.

    Hear my warnings, unbelievers. We have raised altars in this land so that we may sacrifice you to our gods. There is no hope in opposing the inevitable. Put down your arms, unbelievers, and bow before the forces of Chaos!
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2012
    Out of curiosity, what lead you to purchase that book in particular? Because there certainly is good information on diabetes out there. But any book that directs you to the author's website and then shills hundreds of dollars in supplements that you supposedly "need" should raise plenty of red flags. I don't know a lot about Dr. Hyman, but he sounds like a shyster out to make a quick buck rather than someone who wants to actually help people.

    I was recently diagnosed as diabetic myself, so I can relate somewhat to what you're going through. For me, the diagnosis was actually a very positive thing but I'm well aware that many diabetics (or pre-diabetics) don't have all or some of the advantages I have. My experience isn't your experience and I don't want to suggest that you should be feeling better about it. For me it was good because it put into context a number of health problems I'd been experiencing for years, and now armed with the knowledge that I'm diabetic and with medication, I have the tools to much more effectively manage my health and I already feel better than I did before I was diagnosed.

    From what I know as a diabetic, I'd say the three biggest things you're probably going to need to change from a lifestyle perspective is watching the amount of carbs you eat every meal quite carefully. Assuming 3 meals a day, I've been told to keep my carbs down to 45-60 grams per meal for weight loss. Keep in mind that I'm not that overweight (5'11"/205 lbs), so your situation may be rather different. But you'll want to watch closely the amount of carbs you're taking in at each meal, not just for the day as a whole, because you're trying to keep your blood glucose fairly stable.

    The other thing is that you'll really want to try and lose weight so you'll want to watch the total calories you're taking in. That means more fiber as fiber not only has health benefits itself, but also satiates you better and longer than fat or carbs do. I want to emphasize that you don't want to avoid carbs or fat completely. Some of both is healthy. You'll just need to watch the amounts.

    The other crucial step to losing weight will be exercise. Regular exercise. I realize that can be a challenge on a tight budget. You may not be able to afford a gym membership. But it's important that you get regular exercise whether it's walking or cycling or skating, get out and get active on a regular basis. Of course, you'll need to take it easy at first. Be patient, it'll take some time to get in shape.

    Keep in mind this is just some basic, general advice because first of all I'm not a doctor obviously and I also don't know the specifics of your situation. I'll try to answer any questions you have. Do you have health insurance that's covering your prescription and your Dr. visits?

    And remember, at least you caught it before it's actually diabetes. You can act now and improve your health!

    Druhim on
    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    Your doc didn't tell you anything? Just gave you a couple scripts?

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Also I would strongly disagree with what Fantasma said about no sugar or carbs. That might be true for some diabetics, but as general diabetic advice it's wrong. Carbs are important as a source of easy energy, they just need to be in moderation. And sugar is ok in very limited amounts. You need to be aware of the total amount of sugar you're taking in across the whole day as well as at a given meal. Use artificial sweeteners as an option to meet that sweet craving sometimes. Also have an occasional hard candy like a Jolly Rancher isn't a big deal for most diabetics. They're small, so not a whole lot of sugar and you can enjoy it for a long time.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • SiskaSiska Shorty Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Not a nutritionist, but my guess is start eating a high protein diet. Cook your own food and stay away from fast food. Have eggs + whatever affordable raw or frozen unprocessed meat and fish you can find. For example, yes to ground beef and frozen boneless fish or chicken fillets, no to fish sticks and premade hamburger patties. Try and limit your grain and other carbs intake. When you do eat it only do so in small amounts and only whole grain (like brown rice). Stay away from most commercially made breads, even the whole grain kind tends to have lots of corn syrup added to them. Completely stop drinking sugared drinks, including fruit juice. Avoid fruits and veggies with a high sugar content.

    I am assuming that if you stay away from carbs and loose weight you will hopefully get out of the pre-diabetic risk zone and you will be able to start eating a wider variety of foods again. You should probably swear off soda and other sugared drinks for the rest of your life though. Those are the worst.

    Siska on
    Izuela.png
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    Trying to get you the methods of this
    Toshikazu Saito; Makoto Watanabe; Junko Nishida; Tomono Izumi; Masao Omura; Toshikazu Takagi; Ryuzo Fukunaga; Yasutsugu Bandai; Naoko Tajima; Yosikazu Nakamura; Masaharu Ito; for the Zensharen Study for Prevention of Lifestyle Diseases Group
    Lifestyle Modification and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Overweight Japanese With Impaired Fasting Glucose Levels: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Arch Intern Med. 2011;171(15):1352-1360.
    but don't have access at the moment

    do a pubmed lit search and get educated for free

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Also eat a lot more non-starchy veggies every day. And that doesn't mean steamed carrots slathered in butter or a salad drenched in ranch dressing. Keep it simple with a homemade olive oil and vinegar vinaigrette and fresh veggies for a salad. If you don't cook much, that's something I'd very strongly recommend you do more of. If you're not used to cooking, then making appetizing and healthy food will be difficult at first because you won't know what the fuck you're doing and it won't taste like the prepared foods you may be used to because those generally rely on lots of sodium and fat for flavor and lots of carbs for quick, inexpensive (but short term) satiation.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava One day, I will be able to say to myself "I am beautiful and I am perfect just the way I am"Registered User regular
    dad was diagnosed Diabetic a few years ago.

    He and the other nurses in his office all started on a program called "Sugar Busters". It's a great book, and a great cookbook. Dad lost a significant amount of weight when he stuck to the diet, as did one of the nurses, and their blood sugar levels were fantastic.

    It basically consisted of low-carb dieting, replacing white pasta/bread with whole wheat and keeping an eye on the amount of sugars.

    Dad didn't do much exercise other than being a doctor working 9 hour days at the clinic, but it still helped his health a lot.

  • FantasmaFantasma Registered User regular
    Druhim wrote: »
    Also I would strongly disagree with what Fantasma said about no sugar or carbs. That might be true for some diabetics, but as general diabetic advice it's wrong.

    Careful, what I said comes from a true doctor, do I have to assume you are a doctor?

    Hear my warnings, unbelievers. We have raised altars in this land so that we may sacrifice you to our gods. There is no hope in opposing the inevitable. Put down your arms, unbelievers, and bow before the forces of Chaos!
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Argument from authority? That doctor may have stated that for a specific diabetes patient with other complications, or may have been speaking about patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the OP is pre-diabetic, that means type 2 diabetes as the onset tends to be much slower than in type 1.

    But perhaps you'd like to take it up with the Mayo Clinic and argue with their diabetes management advice and how some nameless doctor told you otherwise.
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes/HQ00384

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    Beltaine, are you mainly looking for advice on diabetic diets or are you also interested in ways to get into an exercise and weight loss routine?

    From diabetes.org:
    Q: If I have prediabetes, will I definitely develop type 2 diabetes?
    A: No. Research shows that you can lower your risk for type 2 diabetes by 58% by:

    Losing 7% of your body weight (or 15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds)
    Exercising moderately (such as brisk walking) 30 minutes a day, five days a week
    Don't worry if you can't get to your ideal body weight. Losing just 10 to 15 pounds can make a huge difference. For some people with prediabetes, early treatment can actually return blood glucose levels to the normal range.

    More info on where you're at and what gives you the most trouble with motivation or whatever would help hone any further advice, but for blind advice I'll say that the Couch to 5k program is widely praised and has a lot of success stories.

  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Couch to 5k is good.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    Siska wrote: »
    Not a nutritionist, but my guess is start eating a high protein diet. Cook your own food and stay away from fast food. Eggs + whatever affordable raw or frozen unprocessed meat and fish you can find. For example, yes to ground beef and frozen boneless fish or chicken fillets, no to fish sticks and premade hamburger patties. Try and limit your grain and other carbs intake. When you do eat it only do so in small amounts and only whole grain (like brown rice). Stay away from most commercially made breads, even the whole grain kind tends to have lots of corn syrup added to them. Completely stop drinking sugared drinks, including fruit juice. Avoid fruits and veggies with a high sugar content.

    I am assuming that if you stay away from carbs and loose weight you will hopefully get out of the pre-diabetic risk zone and you will be able to start eating a wider variety of foods again. You should probably swear off soda and other sugared drinks for the rest of your life though. Those are the worst.

    This is pretty much right on. Remove "empty" sugar, like soft drinks, reduce overall carb intake, and switch to whole grain, fiber rich carbs. That, plus oral meds, reduced my A1C by nearly two full points.

    45 - 60 grams per meal is dead on, too. At the clinic I go to, 15 grams is considered a carb unit. Meals should be approximately three carb units, with one carb unit snack/desert.

    Another thing to consider is the space between meal components. If you eat something, then wait a bit (say, 20 minutes) before resuming, your sugar will be higher than if you ate it all at once. You'll basically get a double spike, as you'll spike once due to part one, and while your body is busy dealing with that, a new infusion of sugar comes along, affecting and adding to the already elevated level. That makes going to restaurants a bit harrowing. If you're going to eat a meal, try to eat everything at one sitting. Otherwise, leave 3+ hours between meals.

    My PA, PSN, XBL, Origin, and Steam names are the same. 3DS Friend Code: 1607-1682-2948
    steam_sig-400.png
    Stack Exchange | http://www.mpdevblog.blogspot.com
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Druhim wrote: »
    Argument from authority? That doctor may have stated that for a specific diabetes patient with other complications, or may have been speaking about patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the OP is pre-diabetic, that means type 2 diabetes as the onset tends to be much slower than in type 1.

    But perhaps you'd like to take it up with the Mayo Clinic and argue with their diabetes management advice and how some nameless doctor told you otherwise.
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes/HQ00384

    Let me back up Druhim here because I work for doctors that specialize in this stuff, my dad is diabetic, and my girlfriend has kidney disease (which is sometimes a result of diabetes) so I'm actively involved in this world.

    Even diabetics don't cut out carbs. They cut out stuff like soda, and sweets but carbohydrates (which is essentially sugar) are essential to your body to function (blood-brain barrier for instance). Glucose (which comes from carbohydrates) is basically brain food, and one of the few metabolites that can cross that blood-brain barrier.

    Cut down on soda, sweets, baked goods, cut out adding sugar to foods, increase things like vegetables (fruits should be kept lower) and a more protein heavy diet.

    Oh yeah, lower your blood pressure too. Which means nothing with salt and keep your diet low sodium in general (no diet soda either), start an exercise regimen, and start checking your blood pressure regularly. Your goal is 120 or under, anything higher and you're bordering on hypertension which is a real danger to someone with diabetes (even pre-diabetes). Heart disease, kidney failure, and the whole host of issues come from it, including potentially pushing yourself into diabetes if you're almost there but not quite.

  • QuantumTurkQuantumTurk Registered User regular
    So, IANAD, but one cool thing that stuck with me from my molecular basis of disease class, is that for some reason, exercise can make the GLUT4 (one of your main glucose transporters) responsive to insulin again in diabetics. Granted, short term effects, but still very cool, and gives yet another bonus to exercising. Not only will you be getting fitter, thinner, and healthier in general, but your blood sugar may properly regulate for a while. No clue if this would apply to all types and people with diabetes, but it certainly won't hurt.

  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    it would depend if it is due to genetics or lifestyle, but generally, it does. IAAD, but a PhD not a med. assuming your blood sugar is ok but your insulin is high? or are you starting to get hyperglycemia too?

    definitely work on improving your diet. like has been mentioned, cut out crap like soda and candy, but stay balenced with carbs, protein and good fat. things like fish are great and loaded with good fats. I would suggest sticking to water for most drinking needs.

    definitely definitely see about getting on an exercise regime. there are main ways to clear glucose out of your blood. insulin and exercise. insulin really just clears it out and shuffles it to other place where it is stored or broken down. yet exercise clears it out and always breaks it down, so its less likely to get converted to/stored as fat.

    added bonus in that it will help you loss weight which in turn will help your glucose control.

    camo_sig.png
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Well if he had too much insulin, he probably wouldn't have high blood sugar. Insulin acts to move glucose through the bilipid cell wall so cells can use the glucose for energy. Diabetes is specifically a problem of chronically high blood sugar, so that would tend to either be due to insulin resistance (has normal insulin levels, but for some reason it's not working on the cells properly so not as much glucose gets into the cell) or insufficient insulin production. Type 1 diabetes results from insufficient insulin production and requires insulin injections to stabilize blood sugars. It also tends to be much quicker in onset than type 2 diabetes which is a result of insulin resistance. Being prediabetic, he's basically at high risk of developing increased insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Yup type 2 is usually diet/lifestyle induced (overweight, adipose tissue in midsection/obesity, no exercise) and type 1 you don't usually go through a pre-diabetic phase (also more often seen in children).

  • tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    If you are pre-diabetic you don't need a diabetic diet. You need a lose weight and exercise diet.

    You don't need supplements, outside of maybe a multi-vitamin.

    Me and some friends have had some results with myfitnesspal.com Its basically a way to track your calories and exercise, there's smartphone apps. And basically anything you eat with a barcode is in the database, along with tons of entries for other stuff. You can friend people on the site and/or have it post to your FB for a little extra motivation, and to help keep yourself honest.

    Heres a simple question, What is your normal breakfast?

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Diabetic diets are good diets in general, that's pretty much the case for using it on a pre-diabetic person. Someone on the verge of type 2 should probably cut back on sugar, soda, cupcakes, etc.

  • BeltaineBeltaine The End of TimeRegistered User regular
    Doctor suggested no bread, potatoes, or meat, and going vegetarian. Which wasn't very helpful. Which is why I went looking for a book. Book was on the bestseller shelf and was an impulse buy. I shoulda looked at it a little more first.

    My parents have a home gym they don't use that I'm working to get moved to my place, and one of the coaches at the school I work at has offered to help me with some exercise. Doc didn't seem too interested in exercise when I brought it up.

    At one point I weighed 350 lbs. and started to cut my portions and exercise a little and had lost 65 lbs within a year. Then I hit a brick wall and couldn't seem to get below 285. So I got discouraged and eventually stopped watching what I was eating. When I went back to the doc this time, I was up to 305.

    My normal breakfast is pop-tarts and a diet coke.

    Lunch is whatever the high school cafeteria is serving.

    Dinner is usually something light like a turkey sandwich or something like spaghetti, a pork chop, or crock-pot meatloaf. When I eat at home. When I eat out, which is usually 2-3 times a week, I don't do so good.

    Trepanning is the art of cutting the skull open to let the gods in.
    PSN: Beltaine-77
    Steam: beltane77
    Gamertag:Beltaine
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Type 1 you do go through a honeymoon phase where your insulin production isn't enough to keep you normal (grats, you're now diabetic and very sick!) but it is still above zero.

    Carbohydrates refer to the molecular structure of many things. In your diet we're talking sugars and starches usually. It all ends up the same amount of blood glucose, it just takes a different process. It is energy and is not something you need to cut completely, but as a prediabetic / type 2 you need to control your intake. The insulin that your body can still produce and use correctly is what determines how much of the carbohydrates you can handle, and going over that threshold is what causes hyperglycemia and health issues.

    Fiber is also a carbohydrate but one that our bodies cannot break down into glucose. It goes right through you, hence all the conventional knowledge of fiber re: pooping. This is why high fiber versions in your diet is recommended, since if you have a grain item that is say 20g carbs and 2g fiber your body will break down 18g of that into glucose, but another high-fiber grain item might say 20g carbs and 8g fiber so only 12g gets used up. That's 50% more "counting carbs" in the low-fiber variant. (This is just some bullshit numbers used to illustrate the math, and differences like this are probably not going to be found in straight one-to-one flipping to "high fiber" stuff but changing what you eat to higher fiber items.)

    Fiber also affects how your digestion works in a way that helps regulate blood sugar levels, as a bonus.

    There is no reason that you should break the bank here. Assuming you aren't really watching what you eat all that much now, you might find you start spending less on food, as you control your intake and plan ahead better. There is nothing healthier about healthy/green/fuck-off marketing foods for a diabetic. It is about control and the chemistry/digestion.

    I know more about the nutrition stuff, as a type 1 diabetic with a microbiology background, but exercise helps non-type 1s like yourself a good bit with insulin reception.

    So, controlled diet (i.e. monitor your intake and count your numbers) and simple regular exercise to maintain your levels.

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA OrokosPA
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Beltaine wrote: »
    Doctor suggested no bread, potatoes, or meat, and going vegetarian. Which wasn't very helpful. Which is why I went looking for a book. Book was on the bestseller shelf and was an impulse buy. I shoulda looked at it a little more first.

    My parents have a home gym they don't use that I'm working to get moved to my place, and one of the coaches at the school I work at has offered to help me with some exercise. Doc didn't seem too interested in exercise when I brought it up.

    At one point I weighed 350 lbs. and started to cut my portions and exercise a little and had lost 65 lbs within a year. Then I hit a brick wall and couldn't seem to get below 285. So I got discouraged and eventually stopped watching what I was eating. When I went back to the doc this time, I was up to 305.

    My normal breakfast is pop-tarts and a diet coke.

    Lunch is whatever the high school cafeteria is serving.

    Dinner is usually something light like a turkey sandwich or something like spaghetti, a pork chop, or crock-pot meatloaf. When I eat at home. When I eat out, which is usually 2-3 times a week, I don't do so good.

    Most "doctor" doctors aren't very informed on diabetes, sadly. When I got diagnosed it was a clusterfuck of opinions.

    Fortunately my family doctor didn't try to pretend they knew enough to recommend more than the "obvious" stuff and sent me to a nutritionist. If you can see a diabetic nutritionist (I'm in Canada so that's just automatic and free I think of a reference, but it is a good idea if you can find something) do so. The nutritionist and my endocrinologist had all the answers I needed to get started, and I learned a lot on my own outside that as I went.

    re: the rest, that doesn't sound so bad.

    Are the poptarts a time issue? A bowl of cereal is inexpensive and less sugar-skewed than a poptart. If you need to slam something in a toaster, keep dressing, and then run out the door with something in hand then try switching to whole wheat toast or bagel etc.

    If it's served by a school then lunch is likely not too horrible, from my experiences working at a school division and doing the same thing anyway. :) Just learn what the counts are for foods, get a small carb index book that you can reference. After a while, you won't need it and can gauge carbs on your own pretty well, but you need to constantly do the math at first to practice practice.

    Dinner sounds pretty good. A portion for meat/protein time, if you do the counts you'll probably see you're fine as-is, unless you're drinking a bunch of sugar or some other source of too much crap that you don't realize yet.

    Working at a school can give you some opportunities for a bit of exercise. The most important thing is just doing something, and doing it frequently. At a school you'll find plenty of activity if you look for it usually. Noon hour student activities, staff walk/running groups. I ended up joining in on the tennis club activities while doing IT at a high school, for example, if you can find an activity that you can coach/supervise that gets you exercise and lets the students have more to do then everyone wins!

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA OrokosPA
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • melting_dollmelting_doll Registered User regular
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Druhim wrote: »
    Also I would strongly disagree with what Fantasma said about no sugar or carbs. That might be true for some diabetics, but as general diabetic advice it's wrong.

    Careful, what I said comes from a true doctor, do I have to assume you are a doctor?

    My mom has had Type 2 for 26 years; she was diagnosed with it when I was born. "NO" carbs is definitely not necessarily correct. Some medications require you to consume carbs immediately after taking them so you don't pass out because they are meant to drop your blood sugar so you are able to eat without it skyrocketing in the other direction.

    Diabetic diets are not always a "no carb" diet. They are a LOW carb diet. No more than 45g of carbs per meal, including sugars. I can only guess that a prediabetic diet is a bit more lenient.

    And yeah, exercise! My mom wasn't over weight, she was actually under weight (below 100lbs) when she got Type 2, but her diet/lifestyle were not helping her at all. Now she's healthy and happy and needs very little instruction or scolding from her doctor. Even if it means something simple - exercise doesn't have to mean high impact, 5 days/week torture. Is the weather nice? Enjoy a walk outside for free. Going once a week is still more progressive than not going at all.

    Eating healthy can definitely be pricier than eating cheap crap, but if you can work out your budget it should still be affordable. It doesn't mean you have to buy organic foods. It just means choosing something like lettuce instead of a box of mac and cheese.

    You can do it! (:

    0210-1-1.jpg
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Beltaine, if your doctor wasn't that helpful or interested in discussing exercise with you (exercise is really important for diabetics and pre-diabetics for reducing risks of complications later on), I would urge you to find another doctor who will either engage in a two way conversation with you about what you can realistically adopt into your lifestyle or, if they don't have that information will at least refer you to a specialist who can work with you to improve your lifestyle and diet. Like an endocrinoligist. Maybe it's just that you two have very different communication styles, but your doctor kind of sounds like a jerk.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • SiskaSiska Shorty Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Your doctor sounds like a bit of an unhelpful idiot as far as diets and health are concerned. I am also gonna make a wild guess and assume you don't know how to cook. Nothing to be embarrassed about. Lots of people don't. Start easy, learn how to make hard boiled or scrambled eggs and have that with 1 or 2 slices whole grain toast in the morning. That pop tart has got to go, not a good way to start the day for anyone. Try whole grain pasta and see if you like that well enough to eat instead of the regular kind(takes longer to cook, follow instructions on the package). When you go out to eat, see if they have stuff like grilled chicken salad and go easy on the dressing. Stay away from fries until you are out of the risk zone.

    Once you are comfortable with making scrambled eggs, try using your frying pan for other things, Like boneless chicken breast and other types of meats. The internet and youtube are full of cooking guides and recipes. Look up some simple low carb ones.


    Siska on
    Izuela.png
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2012
    You need a lot more non-starchy veggies in your diet! Looks like you eat almost no veg unless it's already in something you're buying premade, like lettuce or onion on a sandwich. Which is a pretty meager amount of veg. You should shoot for at least 1/2 cup of veggies with every meal to start out. They're generally pretty low cal, contribute a variety of nutrients you need, and tend to be high in fiber. Dietary fiber is important not only because of the direct health benefits, but it also helps keep you satiated so you don't get hungry again as quickly and it can help offset how the carbs you do eat affect your blood glucose in the short term.

    Druhim on
    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Yeah, my point about "healthy" expensive foods is that something that is labelled such usually means dick all. Except that they charge more for it. You preferably want stuff that has no label at all, i.e. cook your own food as much as you can.

    A bit of planning and you'll be saving money.

    TwitchTV channel: OrokosPA OrokosPA
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2012
    Also there's lots of marketing claiming they're selling you the latest "wonder food". Pomegranate juice, acacia berry juice, chia seeds. These are all examples of foods that some research showed there might be some health benefit to that we didn't know about before. So food companies love to jump on the latest news about some new seed or fruit that one or two studies show might have a health benefit and then they refine it into a product and sell it as the latest health food. I'm not saying pomegranate juice is bad for most people (in moderation), but the claims of it being a superfood are greatly exaggerated. Learn to cook your own food. This will give you a major advantage in managing your diet and getting healthier because then you directly control what goes into your food and can make smarter choices. It will take time and education, it won't be easy, but you'll look back a couple of years later and realize proudly that you can prepare your own meals that are both healthy and tasty.

    Druhim on
    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • ceresceres Just your problem OooSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    I have a friend who is pre-diabetic; after a couple years of health problems she was just diagnosed about a month ago, and she's also fairly heavy. They gave her some medication, she's slashed her sugar intake to about a quarter what it was and drinks more water. She told me last week that she noticed the difference within two weeks and now feels 100% better. She has energy to do things again, she's less cranky, and some of her symptoms are beginning to let up.

    She's the only pre-diabetic I know, but the point is she didn't do anything fancy or invest in any major diet programs. I think she and her husband still eat out a lot because they work near each other and like to get together for lunch, but she's careful about what she orders and watches her salt.

    I've got my own life and I've got my own plans
    I hope you understand, and like the way that I am
    Dear Satan...
  • TheOtherHorsemanTheOtherHorseman Registered User regular
    Agreeing with all of the above. When you are a pre-diabetic, the lifestyle modifications you make are essentially what a non-prediabetic would make to be healthier in general. Lose weight. Exercise more. Eat healthy (read: non-american-sized) portions during meals. Cut out soda entirely full stop. Cut out snacks unless they are at least somewhat healthful.

    It will be very helpful if you get into the habit of preparing all of your own meals. Eat a decent breakfast. Brown bag it to work, maybe having prepared and frozen meals in advance on the weekend if time is an issue for you in the evening. Make your own dinner. Take control of what you put in your body so that you become more invested in and knowledgeable of your eating habits.

    Feel free to ignore all that gluten-free homeopathic wizard-blessed quantum new-agey crap in your book. The word organic is mostly junk that doesn't mean as much as most people would like it to in terms of their health. Free range means a lot to the well-being of cows, but not to you as much. Advice about gluten can be ignored unless you decide to take up celiac disease as a hobby one day. In short, that author is trying to milk his readers for all they are worth.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Basically you just want to buy fruits and vegetables and stay away from the bakery. Don't buy enriched bread and stick to wheat or artisan breads. And drink water. And exercise. Any doctor that would hem and haw at that, or dismiss it outright, is a bad doctor.

    Ceres is right (if you're in the range of a type 2 diabetic), higher sodium diets are going to be the tipping point, rather than carbohydrates. Though you should still cut down on candy and baked goods, and stick to fruits like apples. Hypertension is the name of the game and keeping your blood pressure low, coupled with exercise should see an improvement in your overall health at the very least.

  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    Druhim wrote: »
    Well if he had too much insulin, he probably wouldn't have high blood sugar. Insulin acts to move glucose through the bilipid cell wall so cells can use the glucose for energy. Diabetes is specifically a problem of chronically high blood sugar, so that would tend to either be due to insulin resistance (has normal insulin levels, but for some reason it's not working on the cells properly so not as much glucose gets into the cell) or insufficient insulin production. Type 1 diabetes results from insufficient insulin production and requires insulin injections to stabilize blood sugars. It also tends to be much quicker in onset than type 2 diabetes which is a result of insulin resistance. Being prediabetic, he's basically at high risk of developing increased insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.


    technically pre-diabetes is hyperinsulemia with normal glucose. since the normal ability of insulin to exert its effect is compromised, whether it be genetic, or lifestle effects. however the beta cells can compensate so you maintain glucose levels but have elevated insulin. once you cant produce enough insulin you start getting elevated glucose you are diabetic


    type 1 is when you can't make any insulin and requires injections, type 2 generally is lifestyle related, mostly caused by obesity though it has been shown to be inherited

    camo_sig.png
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Ah, ok! Thanks for the clarification mts. I didn't know that.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • KarrmerKarrmer Registered User regular
    Going vegetarian for type 2 diabetes makes about as much sense as ... nothing, ever.

    Start living primal, fix your health issues, enjoy a healthy and delicious life. Marksdailyapple.com or just google it. Eat meat (fatty meat, actually), eggs, vegetables, some fruits, nuts - just get rid of the sugars and refined carbohydrates, really. Anyone that tells you eliminating those two things is a *bad* thing is legitimately ignorant. "Whole grains" and things like rice aren't necessarily the worst but they aren't very useful either and gluten is a huge issue for a lot of people, and definitely doesn't help out a diabetic. There is nothing, at all, redeeming or useful from sugar and refined foods for your average person. If you start doing triathlons we might start allowing some Gatorade or something.

  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Nope. The primal lifestyle is not the right answer for everybody and asserting that's it's diabetic appropriate is absurd. Stop spewing that bullshit all over the forums.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Karrmer wrote: »
    Going vegetarian for type 2 diabetes makes about as much sense as ... nothing, ever.

    Start living primal, fix your health issues, enjoy a healthy and delicious life. Marksdailyapple.com or just google it. Eat meat (fatty meat, actually), eggs, vegetables, some fruits, nuts - just get rid of the sugars and refined carbohydrates, really. Anyone that tells you eliminating those two things is a *bad* thing is legitimately ignorant. "Whole grains" and things like rice aren't necessarily the worst but they aren't very useful either and gluten is a huge issue for a lot of people, and definitely doesn't help out a diabetic. There is nothing, at all, redeeming or useful from sugar and refined foods for your average person. If you start doing triathlons we might start allowing some Gatorade or something.

    Hahahahahahahahahahahaha what.

  • Aurora BorealisAurora Borealis Registered User regular
    I have type 2 diabetes in my family history and I've noticed troubles with my blood sugar in the past few years. The best thing I was told was to eat small meals at regular intervals and to exercise more. When I do this I don't have the scary hypoglycemic episodes. And I feel better in general. I'm told that as long as I can keep my weight at a normal level and don't go crazy on the salt I should be fine.

    Stop with the diet coke and poptarts for breakfast. That shit would be bad news bears for Anyone.

  • BeltaineBeltaine The End of TimeRegistered User regular
    Can anyone suggest something I can eat for breakfast having only a refrigerator and microwave available to me? My wife and I carpool to work, she has to be there 45 minutes earlier than I do, so that 45 minutes at the office is when I do breakfast.

    Trepanning is the art of cutting the skull open to let the gods in.
    PSN: Beltaine-77
    Steam: beltane77
    Gamertag:Beltaine
  • DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Plenty of stuff you could prepare in advance and reheat for breakfast.

    This is our go to for something we have in the fridge as leftovers for a quick, healthy, delicious breakfast, lunch, or even snack.
    http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/02/chana-masala/

    I don't know what your tastes are, so I'm just tossing out one option we like.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
«13
Sign In or Register to comment.