Don't like the snow? You can make a bookmark with the following text instead of a url: javascript:snowStorm.toggleSnow(). Clicking it will toggle the snow on and off.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

GMAT Question (Took test and received scores)

BedigunzBedigunz Registered User regular
edited July 2012 in Help / Advice Forum
So I'm taking my GMAT next Saturday and, long story short, I need to know how the test compares to the study materials provided by various companies (Kaplan, specifically). I'm pulling about 600-650s on my practice tests and am spending the rest of this week and next just polishing up on skills. Just wondering where I stand right now, if anyone has taken it and can offer some advice.

Bedigunz on
s5DoctorFezSunSig.png?t=1306367580.png

Posts

  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    Why don't you take the gmat's official practice test? Once you sign up for the test you can download the software for free.

    My practice scores were pretty much right on to what I got. I have heard that some companies underscore your practice tests so that you're happy when you get your real scores, but I wouldn't count on it.

    One more thing. Personally I believe that once you've freshened up on everything (make sure you do a decent amount of data sufficiency problems!) you're better off studying the verbal question. If you look at the score breakdown by percentage you'll notice that the verbal section has scores that are much lower than the quantitative. I ascribe this to the fact that many gmat takers aren't native English speakers. If you spend the time studying the specifics of the test, things like grammar rules and idiom usage you'll see a higher return than if you spend an equal amount of time on the quantitative sections you'll see a higher overall score result.

    One thing that threw me off during the test itself was that there's no fancy word processor for the essays, it's like typing in notepad. Make sure you give yourself a few minutes to read through everything to correct spelling and grammar mistakes at the end of your time for each question. Even though the consensus seems to be that the essays aren't as important as the rest of the material, it's still worth preparing for them.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    I wish someone told me that no one gives a fuck about the essays. It's not computed into your score.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever TorontoRegistered User regular
    I took it a couple times; I was getting 650s on my practice tests, and on my actual ones I pulled 550 and then 730, so it can be variable :P.

    The first 5 or so questions make a HUGE difference, so take some extra time for those if you need to. Due to the test's adaptive nature, if you mess those up, it wont matter how the rest goes (see my first score :| ). If you're got some practice tests, just run them over and over so you have a good feel for the types of questions, so you know what you can figure out and what you'll need to guess. You've probably already been doing this, judging by your OP.

    And yeah, the essays are just a warm-up if you're a native English speaker. Don't stress out on them, they aren't a part of the final score.

    8R7BtLw.png
  • BedigunzBedigunz Registered User regular
    Thanks! I'm not too worried about the essay, primarily because it isn't computed against my final score, and that the grader basically looks for key words and transitional phrases. I've done a little practice on those but might spend another hour or two preparing.

    Additionally, the new section is apparently a huge clusterfuck so that score isn't going to be weighed very heavily (also not included in the total 800 score).

    I'm nervous because I've taken 5 practice tests and my scores have ranged from 530 - 600 (I got 600 on my last 2 practice tests). I'm taking 1 practice test/day next week to get ready and condition myself. I'm comfortable with the quant section, as well as reading comp and sentence correction. Critical Reasoning is absolutely kicking my ass so if anyone has any tips or tricks, I'd love to hear them.

    s5DoctorFezSunSig.png?t=1306367580.png
  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever TorontoRegistered User regular
    Just keep writing practice tests. I bought the Manhattan GMAT online test suite, 6 repeatable tests which given the adaptive testing are different every time. That worked great for me - I'm terrible at math, and it pointed out what sort of questions I was messing up on so I could focus my studies. Math lessons are available everywhere (Khan Academy comes to mind) so don't bother buying books if you haven't already :P.

    Same process for the language section, just repeat tests ad naseum until you know what you're bad at and how to fix it. You'll also pick up on how the test questions work, and the more intuitively you can get the answer, the better.

    8R7BtLw.png
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    When I was studying I found it much more helpful to go through practice questions five at time. Then I checked the answers and the reasoning behind any I got wrong and repeated. I just thought it was a better use of time than hours of questions and then a few minutes checking over the ones you got wrong after you've forgotten your thought process.

  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever TorontoRegistered User regular
    Cauld wrote: »
    When I was studying I found it much more helpful to go through practice questions five at time. Then I checked the answers and the reasoning behind any I got wrong and repeated. I just thought it was a better use of time than hours of questions and then a few minutes checking over the ones you got wrong after you've forgotten your thought process.

    Not a bad idea - just don't get in the habit of thinking too long about some of those questions. I always found the time constraints a big issue.

    8R7BtLw.png
  • MrTLiciousMrTLicious Registered User regular
    Cauld wrote: »
    score breakdown by percentage[/url] you'll notice that the verbal section has scores that are much lower than the quantitative. I ascribe this to the fact that many gmat takers aren't native English speakers. If you spend the time studying the specifics of the test, things like grammar rules and idiom usage you'll see a higher return than if you spend an equal amount of time on the quantitative sections you'll see a higher overall score result.

    While it will increase your percentile more, keep in mind that most MBA programs care much more about the quantitative score than the verbal score.

    Unless you're interested in a very specific and abnormal school, the quant section is what you should really be focusing on, especially if you're a native speaker.

  • BedigunzBedigunz Registered User regular
    edited July 2012
    Well I just got back from my test and I got a 640, which is lower than what I wanted (min 700).

    I got 80th percentile in quant and 50th percentile in verbal. I'm kinda irked because on my last 2 practice tests I pulled a 680 and a 660. I thought I would be able to get higher than a 640.

    The question I have is, it this enough to get into Kellogg, Booth, Michigan, or Notre Dame (or schools that are comparable around the country)?

    Obviously there is more to the application than just the GMAT score, and I excel in the other areas (I interview extremely well, my essays will be solid, I have a ton of volunteering experience and currently volunteer with the children's hospital, my undergrad GPA is a 3.3, and I've been an auditor for 5 years with international and team leading experience).

    Also, if I retake it (which I'm leaning towards), are there study programs that focus more on verbal than quant? The Kaplan method clearly didn't work out for me so I need a new approach.

    Finally, does anyone know of any good MBA forums where people talk about GMAT, application process, etc?

    Bedigunz on
    s5DoctorFezSunSig.png?t=1306367580.png
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    640s a little on the low end for the tier 1 schools.
    What does your resume/GPA look like? GMAT scores are only part of the equation.

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • BedigunzBedigunz Registered User regular
    The rest of my resume is really solid. I have a letter of rec from a Kellogg grad who started his own not-for-profit (which I volunteer with and am planning to major in), a letter from a supervisor at work, and a third letter from a parent of one of the kids I worked with in the hospital and how I have impacted his child's life (I chose this to be a little creative).

    Undergrad GPA is 3.3, been volunteering with children for 10 years, auditor for 5 years with some international experience and leading projects, as well as spearheading some different projects not related to auditing. My parents have a business that I'm working to take over at some point, and my interview skills are well above average.

    It sucks because I think the rest of my application is strong, but I don't want to apply and get wait-listed or rejected simply because of my score.

    s5DoctorFezSunSig.png?t=1306367580.png
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    Yeah, everything else is up to par, but that GMAT score is on the low end of adequate. If applications are due next week, might as well roll the dice. If you missed the deadline for this year, try again

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • BedigunzBedigunz Registered User regular
    I'm planning to go in Fall 2013 so my application wouldn't be due until January. With that, I figured I should retake the test and work on bettering my verbal score. I just didn't know if it was possible to get in but based on research, it doesn't look like I would have a high chance in getting in.

    s5DoctorFezSunSig.png?t=1306367580.png
  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    Yeah. Retake the test if you have time - the top-end schools like to say they look at all that other stuff, but it's really easy for them to shuffle your application off the pile if the score is below what they like.

  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever TorontoRegistered User regular
    Give it another go - flubbed my first test, btu it worked out in the end. Your GPA is high enough that you won't need anything crazy; just work on that verbal side you should be able to write yourself a ticket to wherever you want.

    8R7BtLw.png
Sign In or Register to comment.