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Suspended from work, would like advice

GaryOGaryO Registered User regular
So I got suspended from work for making a mild insult about a work colleague on facebook. Let me explain
Me and a guy at work don't get on to the point where we havent said anything to each other for 2 months despite working the same department. My facebook post was complaining about the him being interviewed for promotion by his brother (note its a big business, not a family run store and there are plenty of other people who could've done this task -especially as his brother actually works at a different store but still did his promotion interview/exam).
My issue/facebook post was moaning that its biased and unfair for him to get interviewed/tested for promotion by his brother as its clearly a conflict of interest. His brother also got him the job about 4-5 months ago. But the main reason this guy put a complaint in against me was that I called him useless which is what he got annoyed about.

So I used facebook to vent about this issue but this guy (who isn't a facebook friend - nor did I use his name) found out I called him useless on the internet as one of my workmates must have told him about it and now im suspended for gross misconduct and could get sacked.
I used the term useless because since he's in been working our departments standards have dropped and on numerous occasions people have had to come in on days off/early to tidy up our warehouse as it kept turning into a mess whenever I'd have 2 days off in a row. From what my manager said it was only the one sentence which he got upset by and not the majority of the post which was complaining about how he got promoted.

During my suspension interview they asked if I have a problem with working with him and I said not really because we don't talk anyway I just do my job. Then they implied theres also the issue of can he work with me (knowing that I don't particularly care for him).
I technically broke our policy on not badmouthing colleagues on the internet so I understand why I was suspended but i'm not the only person at work to have complained about another colleague though, yet alone this one specific guy

When my disciplinary hearing comes up I plan to point out a few things in my defence.
its my first ever time ive been trouble in over 8 years of working so I feel sacking is a bit much a written warning would be suitable rather than being sacked.
I'll apoligise to him for calling him useless
I was annoyed with his going for a promotion despite his inability over the last couple of months to keep our warehouse tidy which is a key part of our job. For example on several occasions it was impossible to move 2 meters past the door to the warehouse because of badly stacked boxes (note i've got pictures of how bad things got that will back this point up). This issue is largely why we stopped talking. because I would tidy things only for it to become a mess the next day (I did the morning/afternoon shift and he did the evening/night shift) - Kind of a big issue for me because I once tripped on some mess at work and broke my elbow which still gives me problems to this day. Also as recently as 2 weeks ago I made a huge fuss to everyone about things not being kept tidy.
Not to mention the questionability of having a relative decide if he gets promoted
Also I can point I didn't say the comment to the guy who was offended by it but to other people and I'm not the only one to have badmouthed a colleague (although I wont name any names)
If its an issue of working with him in future I can go to another department where i'd have no contact with him

So any advice on how to deal with this disciplinary hearing i'll have at some point or am I fucked and going to be fired? any tips for dealing with a disciplinary hearing would be nice.
I don't know when my hearing is but I know i'm allowed to have another colleague with me to sit in and make sure everything is above board when I do go for it.

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Posts

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    If you get fired, get a lawyer.

    When you go to this meeting, apologize, and reiterate that it was done to friends and in private. It's the same as if you told your friend at home, he told his friend, and they told the coworker who's best buds.

    Also, in the future, stop adding people you work with on facebook. Or people who know people you work with. Alternatively, stop talking about your job in general.

    That's just my advice on how to avoid getting fired for absolutely ridiculous shit that people get their panties in a twist about.

    The other option is to nuke the motherfucking bridge and explain why the guy was useless and how the favoritism is affecting your work. This may or may not have the bonus side effect of improving the situation, but is more likely to end up with you canned.

    HacksawTHEPAIN73
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    You really don't have to read anything past the first sentence. This is part of being an adult and having a job. More important than your petty fighting is dragging your lack of professionalism into a public forum like facebook where it can harm your company.

    That said, when you're going to your hearing, go ahead and use some of the things you said:

    "its my first ever time ive been trouble in over 8 years of working so I feel sacking is a bit much a written warning would be suitable rather than being sacked."
    "I"ll apologize to him..." Yes. You're going to have to show you can work with your coworkers in a professional manner.

    Anything else you said will make it a lot easier for them to decide to fire you.

    Darkewolfe on
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  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    Let me say that I very, very strongly disagree with Bowen.

    No offense, Bowen.

    "Well, look at this. Appears we got here just in the nick of time. What's that make us?"
    "Big Damn Heroes, Sir."
    "Ain't we just."
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    I said the same thing you did, without the apologizing.

    Nuking the bridge is something you should avoid unless you don't give a crap about your job.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    You really should stop talking about your job outside of work. Don't let it bother you. Once you clock out, you're in "home" mode.

    Erios
  • EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
    Ho boy. Lot of stuff going on here.

    -Don't friend coworkers or talk about work on facebook (ever).

    -Document. Document. Document. If your coworker isn't doing their work take notes, send emails, and make sure there is always a document trail to support your side. If you have been doing this have a copy of all of the said documents prepared for this meeting.

    -Document the nature of the grievance, and look up your local HR to see if there is a rule about hiring and conflict of interests. You were disgruntled due to coworker misconduct, this is something you will need to show and convey in an honest and assessment based way to your HR.

    -Don't defend the comment at all. Say it was a poorly thought out moment and that, in the future, you would express such concerns to the appropriate HR office rather than the internet. Also be sure to clarify that you fully understand that the internet is not the place for workplace grievances and that you understand the importance of limiting such items to keep the company image in tact.

    -You should not, ever, in any job or any situation, get to the point of not speaking with a coworker. Ever. Even if you hate the person with the passion of a million suns, you need to suck it up and learn to work with the person, or if the person is not cooperative, pursue a reasonable action to ensure your work can continue to be done in a fashion that does not lay blame. In this circumstance, approaching a supervisor with "a concern for my ability to be able to perform the duties of my position" would have been the best first step. In relation with the hire, contacting HR would have been the better move, BUT ONLY IF YOU WERE APPLYING FOR THE POSITION. If you have no skin in the game, this move is going to be a thousand times more petty than it already is, and honestly as unfair as the situation is... that's life. Often it is who you know in Corporate Culture more than what you know. That's a fact you will need to deal with.

    -Make sure your colleague (if you choose to have one) is either your supervisor or another employee interested in the promotion position that is worried about the nature of the search. These two people are the only relevant people to bring with you.

    Do not make this session a blame game or bitching about your coworker's uselessness situation.
    You need to show that you are a team player who made a serious mistake and still has something to offer the company. You also need to show you have documentation to support both your concerns with the search and your ability to provide a lasting service contribution to the organization.

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  • ceresceres Just your problem OooSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    Never friend coworkers on facebook. And if you do, never ever say anything about work, people or practices, past jobs or present. I've never sat through a disciplinary hearing so I'm not really sure what to tell you about that, but for the rest... consider this a lesson learned. I see this sort of thing on my facebook feed all the time, people complain about people at work, software they have to use for their jobs, some policy going into effect... and all I can think is "wow this person is a moron." If you posted it on facebook, it's not private no matter how solid you think your privacy settings are and yes, you are risking the ire of a higher-up (especially if it's company policy) and possibly your job.

    I agree with bowen about hiring a lawyer if this goes down because seriously, the guy's brother? But disagree that telling them why the guy sucks is a worthwhile risk. I wouldn't do that unless you already have another job lined up and while we're at it, you should REALLY be lining up another job.

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  • EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
    IANAL, but having worked extensively in HR settings usually there is no legal standing if the OP was not in the search and there is no specific restrictions going on work preference. If your HR has a specific rule for not placing family preference, that's one thing (though flimsy if the company doesn't really care). If it is a state employee position, that's another thing entirely (as those search rules are a matter of law rather than company policy).

    In either case, applicability is directly related to if the OP is eligible and has some sort of proof of exclusion from the position. It would also require the position actually being given to the brother, else it would likely not be ripe in several ways.

    But, if terminated, it couldn't hurt to check with a lawyer. Consultations are free, and if your state has some protections you could have some opportunities.

    Guns make you stupid. Better to fight your wars with duct tape. Duct tape makes you smart.
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  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    If there's nothing in his contract about "social media", and he didn't identify the company while bitching, he can probably get severance or unemployment, at the least. As it stands, he's probably looking at losing unemployment. That's the only reason I suggest a lawyer. Even in the states that hate employees.

    bowen on
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    Do you have a union? If so, talk to your union rep.

    That being said, you should not mention anything about the other dude in your hearing. Focus entirely on you. Use "I" language. "I should not have said anything," "my frustration with the hazard presented with the boxes and my previous injury caused me to react inappropriately," etc.

    In the future, as was said before, document, document, document. If the area is supposed to be clean when you come in and it isn't, take a picture of it. Send said picture with a note saying that this presents a hazard to your supervisor and the supervisor in charge of whoever should be cleaning it at night.

    EncKiasHacksawtapeslinger
  • GaryOGaryO Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Some more info. I'm only facebook friends with about half a dozen people (out of 30) out of my workforce And from what i can figure either someone was talking about my comment to someone else at and he overheard or someone directly showed him.
    Im in the UK and know virtually nothing about employment laws.
    My company doesn't have a union and I don't have my place of work even listed on my profile.
    I figure I'm probably going to be sacked as its not the first time the company has got rid of staff for a pretty minor excuse, even if that staff member has previously been a good worker with a flawless disciplinary record.
    I've got dates and photos of several occasions where the warehouse was left in a deplorable state and these times is pretty much the only time i've directly talked about work online other than generic "time to go work/time to go home". And 2 weeks ago I was complaining to my manager about the state of things so its still an issue not being sorted. On one occasion aswell we had to have 3 other store managers, an area manager and more people come in at 7 in the morning to just to tidy up. So its not like it wasa problem all in my head.
    With regards to Enc's comment about "it was a poorly thought out comment etc" I already mentioned to my manager I have a tendency to hyperbole/exagerate when on facebook.
    I don't really want to burn bridges when it comes to work as I do enjoy the job and this issue with this one guy is the only downside. Im fairly sure its a two way street when it comes to disliking each other as we both ignore each other. For example which I mean our shifts overlap by about 2 hours. During this overlap time I'll have been preparing stuff to be put out by the night shift (of which he is a part) so when the night shift starts when I leave they can get straight to work. This guy will ignore everything ive got ready and do his own thing even if it means having the same stuff ready as what I prepared. Whereas other people i've worked with will come in and ask "ok you've done such-and such what's left to get ready?"

    Ive also talked to one of my co-workers who told me that I should've been suspended at the start of my shift, instead it was at end of my shift so the management might have incorrectly followed their disciplinary procedures. And im not sure where my employee handbook is (I got it over 8 years ago!) so I can't look up any policies etc.

    Edit: Im also definately gonna be typing up a cv and looking for a new job over the weekend.

    GaryO on
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Oh man. The UK. You should have no problem fighting this bullshit I'd expect. Didn't the UK make firings based on social media basically illegal? Someone did.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    Also, learn to use the facebook Groups or Circles or whatever it's called feature. Only post things like this to your absolutely closest friend circle.

    You can friend people you work with, but learn to use the privacy/posting filter settings, as I said above.

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  • GaryOGaryO Registered User regular
    There seems to be a couple of cases in the UK about people being fired over social media. It seems like employment tribunals favour the employer if the employee brought the company into disrepute, but favour the employee if they don't actively harm the company by slandering its name etc
    If it comes to being fired I think I might have a case for unfair dismissal. A cursory google search turns up Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Section 1. Which is the bit about free speech "Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right includes the freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by a public authorityand regardless of frontiers."
    The post was done outside work hours, I didn't mention anyones name or the company I work for. (and my profile doesn't say I work for the company.) The only people who can view my posts are people i've friended so its not like I've brought the compant into disrepute, and its the equilvalent of office gossiping it just happens to be online.

  • jamesrajamesra Chicago, ILRegistered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    Never friend coworkers on Facebook. And if you do, never ever say anything about work, people or practices, past jobs or present.

    I sort of agree with this, but mostly don't. If you have a Facebook account, be aware you have no private life. Every job interview I've gone on in the last five years resulted in a "friend" request from the interviewer, or a join/comeback email from Facebook. Facebook is a tool for stalking; everything about it says "personal privacy is evil". And if you have a Facebook account and your boss tries to friend you, don't assume it is safe to say no. If you read _The Open Society_ and say Great! That is the world I want to live in, Facebook is for you. If not, not. To some extent this goes for all social media, but Facebook is exceptional in its desire to eliminate private identities.

    In terms of advice, yeah, it is pretty good. Lawyer up if you like, although if you are in the States you are basically without recourse most of the time if you're not in a protected class. Through yourself on the mercy of the court. In my experience with things like this, the fix is in easily half the time. After I was physically and sexually assaulted badly and thoroughly enough that I made the papers, my boss at the time a) wrote me up for missing work the day I was in the hospital and pointed out that he had never had any of his terminations come back on him, because he always followed the rules exactly. Every year, the EEOC tee's up on him (I get an annual call) and every year he has a perfect cover for having, always and forever, a team composed for straight, white, Christian (but not Catholic) suburban male employees. He knows how to work the system.

    That guy is a particular and hopeful exceptional example, to be sure. But it remains if they are going after you for this (and unless your specific insult was way more serious than you've indicated), they most likely want to go after you and that indicates that they'll succeed, later if not now. So yeah. Look for a new job. I'd probably just give notice, since that provides some protection, but I've become profoundly cynical about corporate culture.

    And work for a union. (everyone. Seriously; I assume that a non-trivial number of people here are, like myself in IT. A classic workplace union isn't viable for us but without organization, we'll just get screwed now and forever. If you're not in IT, the case should be even more obvious. Here ends the PSA).

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    Erich Zahn
  • kaliyamakaliyama Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    I think this will go better for you if you keep in mind this isn't so minor from an employee's perspective. It's impossible to run a functional workplace if your employees are at each other's throats. They could be in legal trouble if you systematically harass the other guy, and they know about it and don't do anything.

    So, what they want to hear is that you are contrite, understand why what you did was wrong and that you won't do it again. All you need to say is that. It should take a minute at most. What you will probably do, if you talk like you post, is give a long rambling and poorly formatted justification for why what you did wasn't that bad and you shouldn't be fired for it. Don't do that.

    You're right what you did isn't that bad, but that's not the issue - to the employer, you're somebody who has no problem bitching about work and coworkers you don't like on the Internet. They have no way of knowing if this is an uncharacteristic and rare lapse of judgment, or if this is the tip of the iceberg of your behavioral defects.

    You would give credence to the tip of the iceberg theory if you tried to defend yourself as you have here, because it would indicate you are resentful of authority and so have an attitude problem, as well as poor judgment because you didn't see why what you did was inappropriate.

    If you want to lawyer up I would do so before your meeting, as what is said and done there will be crucial for any legal claim you may have, but doing so makes it much less likely that you will have long term employment there.

    kaliyama on
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  • JurgJurg In a TeacupRegistered User regular
    I only really know about US law, but I wouldn't bring up the part about freedom of expression. In the US, you'd get laughed out of the room, and I know that in terms of employment systems, the US and the UK are pretty similar. That means that governments can't infringe upon your right to expression.

    Your best bet is to apologize profusely.

    sig.gif
  • BYToadyBYToady Registered User regular
    GaryO wrote: »
    There seems to be a couple of cases in the UK about people being fired over social media. It seems like employment tribunals favour the employer if the employee brought the company into disrepute, but favour the employee if they don't actively harm the company by slandering its name etc
    If it comes to being fired I think I might have a case for unfair dismissal. A cursory google search turns up Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Section 1. Which is the bit about free speech "Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right includes the freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by a public authorityand regardless of frontiers."
    The post was done outside work hours, I didn't mention anyones name or the company I work for. (and my profile doesn't say I work for the company.) The only people who can view my posts are people i've friended so its not like I've brought the compant into disrepute, and its the equilvalent of office gossiping it just happens to be online.

    Unless you work for the government I don't think that really applies.

    Battletag BYToady#1454
  • ShutdownShutdown Registered User regular
    It might not help much but if you're calling the other guy 'useless' because of something specific "ie. he left a mess in the main area and left it for someone else to clean up" it might help your stance if you were blowing off steam about something rather than festering a grudge.

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    Again, from the perspective of management, someone saying anything negative that results from their work environment in a public space is one of the big problems here. Whether you feel like you identified the company or not, they don't like the impression that you're so frustrated with them that you're willing to talk about it in a public forum, which facebook is whether you like it or not.

    And if you're frustrated enough to vent about it in a public forum, from their perspective they probably ought to go ahead and replace you now, before you cause more problems and then quit suddenly or something. Or before you damage their reputation by saying something else. Or before you lower morale with the other employees you're venting to.

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  • Mr. PokeylopeMr. Pokeylope Registered User regular
    You have to understand that the posting is not equilvalent to "office gossiping" but to insulting this guy in front of all your co-workers and bosses while being recorded.

  • Erich ZahnErich Zahn So Wangtta~! Remember to [E]ject!Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Your best bet isn't to apologize.

    It's to salvage your fucking dignity and figure out how to never have to deal with this shit ever again.

    I recommend putting somebody else's photos on your facebook account, removing your own, cancelling the account and then moving to G+.

    Erich Zahn on
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    Erich Zahn wrote: »
    Your best bet isn't to apologize.

    It's to salvage your fucking dignity and figure out how to never have to deal with this shit ever again.

    I recommend putting somebody else's photos on your facebook account, removing your own, cancelling the account and then moving to G+.

    The idea there is no dignity in an apology is childish.

    He clearly broke the rules, there are other thing involved but management types like it when you identify errors in your ways and strive to correct them. This is a big reason why I think an apology is an important step to keeping his job.

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  • HacksawHacksaw J Duggan Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    Apologize for any controversy you might have caused.

    Afterwords, when you get home, unfriend all your co-workers on Facebook. They've proven they can't be trusted.

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  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    Since you are in the UK and have long service you will at least have a slightly better chance perhaps than if you were say American (if half what we hear about their labour law is true!).

    If you cannot afford to get a lawyer, then I suggest you do consider talking to the following:

    1. ACAS - they are the government's employment advisory service (LRA in Northern Ireland). Someone will be willing to talk to you on the phone about your situation. They may also be able to provide mediation, or conciliation if things progress to dismissal

    2. The local Citizen's Advice Bureau - they will usually have an employment law clinic. Go see them!

    3. Community Law Centre - these are not so common, but if you have one nearby they may also be able to give general advice

    The latter two may be willing to meet you.

    You could consider joining a Trade Union. They may not want to help a new member, but worth enquiring about.

    Further advice

    1. Read your contract and handbook. Specifically - the disciplinary & suspension rules, bullying & harassment and social media. You may have none of these though, but worth looking at if you do.

    2. Read the following links, from ACAS, about disciplinary issues or procedures.

    3. How much do you know about the chair of the hearing? Would a sincere apology, with explanation and mitigating circumstances help?

    4. Character statements from colleagues

    5. Who can you trust to be your representative at the hearing? Generally they will just let you take a colleague or trade union rep, but are not obliged to let anyone else. Don't be afraid to ask though

    6. You will have the right to appeal any outcome. Do so if you are not happy

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  • ceresceres Just your problem OooSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    If @LewieP's Mummy is around, she may know something about this as well.

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  • TheBigEasyTheBigEasy Registered User regular
    GaryO wrote: »
    Also I can point I didn't say the comment to the guy who was offended by it but to other people and I'm not the only one to have badmouthed a colleague (although I wont name any names)

    This hasn't been commented on and you probably abandoned this plan anyways - but the bolded part is not a good idea. It didn't work with your mom, when you were a kid and told her "But mooom, HE started it", it won't work now with your employer.

    Someone above said it right. Apologize and don't say anything else. Yes, it is absolutely ridicoulus to suspend you for this and make such a huge fuss about it, but don't make it worse by mouthing off at the hearing.

  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    The short version is companies (bosses) don't like problems.

    You created one by your post, and whoever spread it to the subject. So you need to convince them you will not be a problem.

    Un-friend all your co-workers; if they ask why, this is the perfect reason.

    Excision wrote: »
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  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    If you can prove that other people didn't get fired for a first offence of bad-mouthing colleagues, then you'll have a pretty good case for unfair dismissal.

    That said, you did dun goofed, and your next move is to go to the hearing, be very contrite, be open about accepting that you did the wrong thing and apologise unreservedly. Finish up by saying that you realise what you did wrong and why it was wrong, and you're still committed to working with the team if they'll give you another chance.

    Then shut your fool mouth and don't say anything more. Don't try and justify yourself. Don't talk about unfair dismissal. Above all for the love of god don't don't DON'T badmouth this co-worker in any way whatsoever, even if they try to lead you into saying anything about him. Especially if they try and lead you into saying anything about him.

    If they're looking to fire you then the last thing you want to do is to give them any ammo they can use against you. If you try and justify yourself, they can claim they will think you'll do it again. If you say anything bad about this guy, they can claim they think you'll continue to harass him.

    Say sorry for causing all this trouble, say you were in the wrong, say you understand that its unprofessional to discuss colleagues, say that you've learned your lesson and will be good in future. Say you still want your job. Then shut up.

    Jam WarriorKiasEsseeLuianetapeslinger
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    Kalkino wrote: »
    Since you are in the UK and have long service you will at least have a slightly better chance perhaps than if you were say American (if half what we hear about their labour law is true!).

    You have no idea, brother, how terrible our laws are. All of it is true, and probably then some. Unless you're highly skilled labor (degree/union) you are going to get assfucked 18 ways to Sunday. Seriously, it's like the 1800s here.

    kaortiNightDragonErich Zahn
  • tarnoktarnok Registered User regular
    I can't give you much advice about the law (can't give you _any_ really) but I have a few suggestions from a group psychology perspective.

    First, TheBigEasy is spot on about the "everyone else is doing it" defense. It will only hurt your position. That may not seem rational or fair, but it's best to put those two ideas aside for the time being. There is no rational or fair right now, there's only "does this help my situation?" and that argument does not. At best it will probably seem like whining to whoever is hearing your case, at worst they'll want names and it'll trigger a witch hunt.

    In a similar vein, don't try to make this about the behavior on his part that triggered your comment. His actual uselessness is an issue that will have to be dealt with separately if at all and bringing it up will seem like trying to shift the blame.

    In my estimation your best chance here is to take responsibility for the post, apologize and lean on your work record. Your case should be that this was a mistake by an otherwise model employee and it would be a terrible waste of resources and an injustice to fire such a person over one error.

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  • TubeTube Says some shit Administrator, ClubPA admin
    1. Don't get into petty grudges at work
    2. Don't post about work on Facebook
    3. If you get in trouble for something, don't try and justify it. Apologise. Bringing up anything more about this petty grudge will just make you look like a child.
    4. Don't post about work on Facebook

    bowenKiasUsagiGonmunEsseetastydonutsCaptain ElevenzerzhulASimPersonJaysonFour143999ToxErich ZahnThe Anonymous
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    ...Don't make passive aggressive posts on Facebook (obviously don't talk about work on FB, as has been mentioned like 10 times already, but just avoid passive aggressive bullshit on it in general), or treat it like a private diary / journal. If you want a diary, buy a diary (and there's no shame in it if that's what you want).

    If you don't have a union, you're probably SOL. Start printing resumes and / or filling out applications for other jobs.

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  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    On the flipside, if you do post about work on facebook, post about how much you love it...that could get you brownie points ;p

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  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    On the flipside, if you do post about work on facebook, post about how much you love it...that could get you brownie points ;p

    I just prefer @bowen 's method:
    You really should stop talking about your job outside of work. Don't let it bother you. Once you clock out, you're in "home" mode.

    Once I get home, unless someone asks, I never discuss work (if someone does asks, it, "Went good,"). Even talking about how super-good-awesome your job can piss someone off, and besides, I spend enough time at work: I don't need to bring it home with me too.

    The Ender on
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    If that guy wasn't white he would have gotten popped by so many tasers simultaneously that Marvel could use that as the new origin for Electro.
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  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    Hmm...I suppose. I do work at a smaller company though (70 people), so I can see how that would change the dynamics a bit.

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  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    20 people here, never ever discuss work. Maybe I'll discuss the nuances of a project (so long as I'm not bound by an NDA) with a friend or family, but I'll never comment on office politics or drama. That's just a recipe for disaster. As for how super-good-awesome it could be, that will come back at your face whenever you need/want to air grievances.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    I saw someone almost get fired the other day for a facebook post, and he was a government worker in a union (although he reffered to the organization as fucking bullshit, and his boss as a cocksucker so that could be warranted). Organizations are super crazy about employees on facebook, and union contracts generally don't protect against facebook smacktalkery.

  • HeirHeir Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Tube wrote: »
    4. Don't post about work on Facebook

    This can't be stressed enough. No matter what it is that you say about work online, it can be taken the wrong way.

    This goes doubly for a publicly-traded company.

    Heir on
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  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    jamesra wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    Never friend coworkers on Facebook. And if you do, never ever say anything about work, people or practices, past jobs or present.

    I sort of agree with this, but mostly don't. If you have a Facebook account, be aware you have no private life. Every job interview I've gone on in the last five years resulted in a "friend" request from the interviewer, or a join/comeback email from Facebook. Facebook is a tool for stalking; everything about it says "personal privacy is evil". And if you have a Facebook account and your boss tries to friend you, don't assume it is safe to say no. If you read _The Open Society_ and say Great! That is the world I want to live in, Facebook is for you. If not, not. To some extent this goes for all social media, but Facebook is exceptional in its desire to eliminate private identities.

    Or, you could simply not tell your boss/interviewer/coworkers that you have a Facebook account and set the privacy settings properly so they can't find you when they look.

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