Vanilla Forums has been nominated for a second time in the CMS Critic "Critic's Choice" awards, and we need your vote! Read more here, and then do the thing (please).
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Women, basketball, hos and radio hosts

1242527293033

Posts

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    So by giving Imus the death sentence we have taken the equivalent of a drug dealer off the open market. If this is true then someone else will just replace Imus and use the same types of jokes.

    I ask what have we accomplished?



    Besides giving us something to talk about on the 24 hour cable news networks of course.

    Pushing the "druggies" even further out to the fringe, I'd hope. No one ever said that there'd ever be a dearth of hateful motherfuckers on the airwaves, but events of this nature serve to marginalize them and their hateful rhetoric. Big corporations with a wide reach are going to treat him and others like him like they're radioactive, therefore they reach fewer people, and we hopefully have less retards taking their cues from DJ Hatey McBigot.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • tyrannustyrannus Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    So by giving Imus the death sentence we have taken the equivalent of a drug dealer off the open market. If this is true then someone else will just replace Imus and use the same types of jokes.

    I ask what have we accomplished?

    Assuming that drugs are bad, what's wrong with removing dealers from the streets?
    Increased demand for them, dealers could theoretically charge a bit more because of a lack in competition, making dealing more lucrative?

    I don't know.

  • Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Rentilius wrote: »
    So by giving Imus the death sentence we have taken the equivalent of a drug dealer off the open market. If this is true then someone else will just replace Imus and use the same types of jokes.

    I ask what have we accomplished?

    Assuming that drugs are bad, what's wrong with removing dealers from the streets?
    Increased demand for them, dealers could theoretically charge a bit more because of a lack in competition, making dealing more lucrative?

    I don't know.

    I guess Manning'sEquation's analogy sucks, then.

    2ezikn6.jpg
  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Hate speech does fuck up your brainmeats, though. But yeah, not really a good anology. Not many analogies are, really.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Manning'sEquationManning'sEquation Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    wwtMask wrote: »
    So by giving Imus the death sentence we have taken the equivalent of a drug dealer off the open market. If this is true then someone else will just replace Imus and use the same types of jokes.

    I ask what have we accomplished?



    Besides giving us something to talk about on the 24 hour cable news networks of course.

    Pushing the "druggies" even further out to the fringe, I'd hope. No one ever said that there'd ever be a dearth of hateful motherfuckers on the airwaves, but events of this nature serve to marginalize them and their hateful rhetoric. Big corporations with a wide reach are going to treat him and others like him like they're radioactive, therefore they reach fewer people, and we hopefully have less retards taking their cues from DJ Hatey McBigot.


    So the same would be true if we attack the DJ Hatey McBigot's of the popular music scene?

  • Manning'sEquationManning'sEquation Registered User regular
    edited April 2007

    I guess Manning'sEquation's analogy sucks, then.

    Let no one say you lack tact Loren. At least I try to discuss analogies instead if throwing insults at them. If the analogy is false then the rational people of this forum will see it as such in a few pages.

    In short please keep the discourse civil; I have not tried to offend you or anyone in this thread.

  • Zephyr_FateZephyr_Fate Registered User regular
    edited April 2007

    I guess Manning'sEquation's analogy sucks, then.

    Let no one say you lack tact Loren. At least I try to discuss analogies instead if throwing insults at them. If the analogy is false then the rational people of this forum will see it as such in a few pages.

    In short please keep the discourse civil; I have not tried to offend you or anyone in this thread.

    It is very rare that any discourse here is civil...if you have an opposing opinion, you are a complete and utter retard.

    Of course, I don't think either of those apply to Loren whatsoever.

  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2007
    I ask what have we accomplished?

    Took a bigot off the air by giving a negative reaction. Given that reaction, why would the networks replace him by someone like him?

  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    wwtMask wrote: »
    So by giving Imus the death sentence we have taken the equivalent of a drug dealer off the open market. If this is true then someone else will just replace Imus and use the same types of jokes.

    I ask what have we accomplished?



    Besides giving us something to talk about on the 24 hour cable news networks of course.

    Pushing the "druggies" even further out to the fringe, I'd hope. No one ever said that there'd ever be a dearth of hateful motherfuckers on the airwaves, but events of this nature serve to marginalize them and their hateful rhetoric. Big corporations with a wide reach are going to treat him and others like him like they're radioactive, therefore they reach fewer people, and we hopefully have less retards taking their cues from DJ Hatey McBigot.


    So the same would be true if we attack the DJ Hatey McBigot's of the popular music scene?

    Only if we attacked the artist through threatening to boycott the label, radio stations, and any merchandisers who may have been using him or her in add campaigns.

    Protest the artist in particular, and all you do is add to the controversy surrounding the person and give them further notoriety. So long as people don't connect artists with the people who finance them and sell their records, there's no financial risk in putting out those albums.

    Home-1.jpg
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Elkamil wrote: »
    I ask what have we accomplished?

    Took a bigot off the air by giving a negative reaction. Given that reaction, why would the networks replace him by someone like him?

    There's still an audience for it. Imus still had quite a large fanbase. They got rid of him because sponsers were pulling out not because he wasn't going to get listeners anymore. If they replace him with Martha Stewart that fanbase will go elsewhere for thier racist idoicy.

  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2007
    Elkamil wrote: »
    I ask what have we accomplished?

    Took a bigot off the air by giving a negative reaction. Given that reaction, why would the networks replace him by someone like him?

    There's still an audience for it. Imus still had quite a large fanbase. They got rid of him because sponsers were pulling out not because he wasn't going to get listeners anymore. If they replace him with Martha Stewart that fanbase will go elsewhere for thier racist idoicy.

    Well, I do understand that we're not banning stormfront, I'm just saying we're removing it from a major news outlet. Not the biggest step ever, just a step.

  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    celery77 wrote: »
    Regardless, the whole "can't address a group" schlock is a load of crap. Blacks are a sizable voting block, there's a coherent culture (with a lot of variation), and advocacy groups pushing their interests. It's solipsist defensive bullshit.
    Loren, do you then want me and Jinn to spend the next 20 or so pages quoting black voices from the hip hop community advocating directly against the misogyny and sexism you're saying is the problem?

    No, how about you start siting instances of black community leaders like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton where they forced record labels to drop black artists because of their misogynistic message through heavy-handed threats of boycotts. I think the real problem I have with this whole Imus situation is the complete hypocrisy of the reaction.

    It's fine for hip-hop and rap to convey a message of misogyny, violence, and hate thousands of time more often and more relevant than Imus did because that's what the public (mostly white suburban kids) are buying, but it's a national tragedy if some irrelavent old white guy makes an offensive joke.

    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's fine for Jesse Jackson, while he was a viable presidential candidate, to call NYC "hymietown", and then proceed to throw himself at every television camera he can find as soon as he smells the hint of someone else making a racially insensitive comment.

    It's fine for Al Sharpton to lead a protest in which he called a store owner a "white interloper", which contributed to inciting one of the protesters to burned down the store killing himself and 8 other innocent people, but he'll lead the charge to get Imus fired.

    Jesse Jackson can say that he's "sick and tired of hearing about the holocaust", but he's remained in the forefront of the fight against racism.

    Al Sharpton has now been part of two separate incidents where he heavily threw his support behind a black woman who fabricated allegations of being raped by white guys, both times creating a media shit-storm and a very public outrage amongst the black community, but he's remained in the forefront of the fight against racism.

    It's all just hypocritical, attention-whoring, race-bating, bullshit.

  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Actually, if you'll remember, Jesse Jackson's hymietown comments completely destroyed his presidential viability.

    But, you know, we'll just ignore history.

    You might also want to read the last 10 or so pages in regards to hip-hop artists having messages of misogyny and homophobia in their music, seeing as how we've had that argument like 6 times.

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    No, how about you start siting instances of black community leaders like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton where they forced record labels to drop black artists because of their misogynistic message through heavy-handed threats of boycotts. I think the real problem I have with this whole Imus situation is the complete hypocrisy of the reaction.

    How do you boycott something you don't buy? The only reason people who don't listen to Imus' show got him fired is because there are sponsors. In the music business, they do not exist.

    We could try to do to rappers what was done to Imus, but I'm sure most people would rather spend their time opening refrigerators to fight global warming. It's probably more productive.

    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for hip-hop and rap to convey a message of misogyny, violence, and hate thousands of time more often and more relevant than Imus did because that's what the public (mostly white suburban kids) are buying, but it's a national tragedy if some irrelavent old white guy makes an offensive joke.

    Who said it was fine? Oh, that's right, nobody. And he wasn't irrelevant. If he was, they would've fired his ass on day one, but they didn't because he's popular.
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."

  • The Green Eyed MonsterThe Green Eyed Monster i blame hip hop Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    @ TheCanMan -- all you just did is re-iterate the same positions we spent the previous 37 pages discussing. You appear determined to refuse to acknowledge the 37 pages worth of responses that many different people have supplied. Besides all that, your "defense" of Imus seems to consist entirely of attacking black comedians, black rappers, and black public figures. It's pretty exasperating, and ultimately pretty dumb.

    wisdom wrote:
    if knowledge is power and power corrupts, be smart, be evil
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I'd just wanted to clear up my overall point in this whole discussion.

    The only reason I'm defending Imus is because I didn't think it was a racist comment. Was it racially insensitive? Sure, but I don't think that's the same thing. I believe that intent should be must more powerful than the actual words and in this case, if you are at all familiar with Imus' show, you'd realize that the intent of the comments was meant to be humorous, not malicious. Otherwise you'd have to believe that Imus and everyone involved with his show are openly and very publicly bigoted against pretty much every single group possible, including but not limited to blacks, women, jews, asians, arabs, fat people, bald people, alcoholics, and old people. His producers/co-hosts also make fun of him on a regular basis, so you can add old white people to that list of people the Imus in the Morning crew hate, too.

    I'm also tired of seeing race-bating, meglomaniacal, attention whoring, assholes like Jackson and Sharpton acting like every little thing is the end of the fucking world. Remember the old adage about the boy who cried wolf? The only thing stuff like this accomplished is to marginalize outrage over actual instances of racism. I will guarantee you that I'm not the only person, including white people and black people, who see either of them on television and immediately assume that they're just trying to grab the spot light.

    I also don't want to see any black comedians or music artists censored, through either government involvement or threats of public boycotts. The only reason I even bring any of that up is to point out the hypocracy. I'm all for trying to wipe out racism, but I just think the power of the public outcry needs to be weilded much more juditiously.

  • Tw4winTw4win Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."


    The question, of course, is which one was parody and which one is the bigoted shitsack?

    I think there's just as much racism against whites as there is against blacks...

    steam_sig.png
  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Tw4win wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."


    The question, of course, is which one was parody and which one is the bigoted shitsack?

    I think there's just as much racism against whites as there is against blacks...

    Please, elaborate.

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Tw4win wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."


    The question, of course, is which one was parody and which one is the bigoted shitsack?

    I think there's just as much racism against whites as there is against blacks...

    How are you quantifying racism?

    I just don't see how that's possible, when whites are the majority and in control of far more aspects of human life.

    Canman: A comment that is meant to be humorous can also be racist in nature, especially if it's a joke at someone's expense. "It was a joke," is not a legitimate excuse unless it's a parody, and there's nothing in Imus' history to indicate that he actually has a positive opinion (the opposite of what was shown on his show) of any of the minorities he lambasts and doesn't wish to present racist stereotypes as the truth.

    Home-1.jpg
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    No, how about you start siting instances of black community leaders like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton where they forced record labels to drop black artists because of their misogynistic message through heavy-handed threats of boycotts. I think the real problem I have with this whole Imus situation is the complete hypocrisy of the reaction.

    How do you boycott something you don't buy? The only reason people who don't listen to Imus' show got him fired is because there are sponsors. In the music business, they do not exist.

    We could try to do to rappers what was done to Imus, but I'm sure most people would rather spend their time opening refrigerators to fight global warming. It's probably more productive.

    So, if Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson tried to organize a boycott of every artist a particular record label handled until a particular artist was released, that'd be completely unproductive?

    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for hip-hop and rap to convey a message of misogyny, violence, and hate thousands of time more often and more relevant than Imus did because that's what the public (mostly white suburban kids) are buying, but it's a national tragedy if some irrelavent old white guy makes an offensive joke.

    Who said it was fine? Oh, that's right, nobody. And he wasn't irrelevant. If he was, they would've fired his ass on day one, but they didn't because he's popular.
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."

    And it's not my fault that you don't understand the entire comedic genre of insult comedy. Either it's ok to tell racially charged jokes, regardless of the genre of comedy, or it isn't?

  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    No, how about you start siting instances of black community leaders like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton where they forced record labels to drop black artists because of their misogynistic message through heavy-handed threats of boycotts. I think the real problem I have with this whole Imus situation is the complete hypocrisy of the reaction.

    How do you boycott something you don't buy? The only reason people who don't listen to Imus' show got him fired is because there are sponsors. In the music business, they do not exist.

    We could try to do to rappers what was done to Imus, but I'm sure most people would rather spend their time opening refrigerators to fight global warming. It's probably more productive.

    So, if Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson tried to organize a boycott of every artist a particular record label handled until a particular artist was released, that'd be completely unproductive?
    A) that's entirely unrealistic and has nothing to do with how a market actually works in real ilfe

    B) Even if every black person in the United States got behind the boycott, it would still be ineffective because 70% of hip-hop consumers are white.

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • The Green Eyed MonsterThe Green Eyed Monster i blame hip hop Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    And it's not my fault that you don't understand the entire comedic genre of insult comedy. Either it's ok to tell racially charged jokes, regardless of the genre of comedy, or it isn't?
    Saying it's "insult" comedy doesn't make it inoffensive or okay. Imus and (good) comedians like Chappelle and Chris Rock are not making comparable jokes in any way, shape, or form. I just can't let this go because it's a complete disservice to the understanding and critique of humor.

    wisdom wrote:
    if knowledge is power and power corrupts, be smart, be evil
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Good racial humor usually has to have some sembelence of social context or purprose. Imus' comments just sound like he's a dick.

  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    oh boy that Chris Rock sure is making negative comments about subjects just like Don Imus! Watch that video! Chris Rock is JUST LIKE Imus! There is NO difference! hurr.gif

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • The Green Eyed MonsterThe Green Eyed Monster i blame hip hop Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    wisdom wrote:
    if knowledge is power and power corrupts, be smart, be evil
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Jinnigan wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    No, how about you start siting instances of black community leaders like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton where they forced record labels to drop black artists because of their misogynistic message through heavy-handed threats of boycotts. I think the real problem I have with this whole Imus situation is the complete hypocrisy of the reaction.

    How do you boycott something you don't buy? The only reason people who don't listen to Imus' show got him fired is because there are sponsors. In the music business, they do not exist.

    We could try to do to rappers what was done to Imus, but I'm sure most people would rather spend their time opening refrigerators to fight global warming. It's probably more productive.

    So, if Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson tried to organize a boycott of every artist a particular record label handled until a particular artist was released, that'd be completely unproductive?
    A) that's entirely unrealistic and has nothing to do with how a market actually works in real ilfe

    B) Even if every black person in the United States got behind the boycott, it would still be ineffective because 70% of hip-hop consumers are white.


    And exactly what percentage of Stables' consumer base comes from the black population? Exactly what percentage of Bigalow Tea come from the black population?

  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    And exactly what percentage of Stables' consumer base comes from the black population? Exactly what percentage of Bigalow Tea come from the black population?

    I fail to see the relevance. You went from saying we should boycott hip-hop records, to... something else?

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2007
    How do people don't buy something boycott it? I really want to know.

  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    celery77 wrote: »
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    Ok, so how about we start going through the lyrics of the most popular hip-hop/rap songs and compair them to the most popular pop/country/rock/puck songs? If you can't even admit that this is a bigger issue in popular hip-hop and rap than in most musical genres, then there really isn't any point in discussing this further.

  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Jinnigan wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    And exactly what percentage of Stables' consumer base comes from the black population? Exactly what percentage of Bigalow Tea come from the black population?

    I fail to see the relevance. You went from saying we should boycott hip-hop records, to... something else?

    Those are Imus' sponsors.

    I don't think it's a fair point, though, because white people hate racism too and there's no reason to believe that only black people would be boycotting those entities (though I'm sure lots of black people shop at Staples, and like tea).

    Home-1.jpg
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Jinnigan wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    And exactly what percentage of Stables' consumer base comes from the black population? Exactly what percentage of Bigalow Tea come from the black population?

    I fail to see the relevance. You went from saying we should boycott hip-hop records, to... something else?

    Actually, you said that since 70% of hip-hop consumers are white, that a boycott organized by black activists like Sharpton and Jackson would be futile. But they just proved that the threat of a boycott of Staples and Bigalow Tea (among other things) is indeed effective.


    Elkamil wrote: »
    How do people don't buy something boycott it? I really want to know.
    So, just because you don't buy a particular artist's albums means that by threatening to boycott all artists a particular record label manages would be completely meaningless?

  • ElkiElki hegemon globalSuper Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    celery77 wrote: »
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    Ok, so how about we start going through the lyrics of the most popular hip-hop/rap songs and compair them to the most popular pop/country/rock/puck songs? If you can't even admit that this is a bigger issue in popular hip-hop and rap than in most musical genres, then there really isn't any point in discussing this further.

    What does this have to do with "the black community"?

  • Tw4winTw4win Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Tw4win wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    It's fine for black comedians to make racially charged jokes about white people because...well actually nobody's been able to give me a valid reason why that's ok...but Imus borrowing a colloquialism from the urban vernacular for comedic effect makes him a racist asshole.

    It's not our fault you can't tell the difference between "parody" and "bigoted shitsack."


    The question, of course, is which one was parody and which one is the bigoted shitsack?

    I think there's just as much racism against whites as there is against blacks...

    How are you quantifying racism?

    I just don't see how that's possible, when whites are the majority and in control of far more aspects of human life.

    Canman: A comment that is meant to be humorous can also be racist in nature, especially if it's a joke at someone's expense. "It was a joke," is not a legitimate excuse unless it's a parody, and there's nothing in Imus' history to indicate that he actually has a positive opinion (the opposite of what was shown on his show) of any of the minorities he lambasts and doesn't wish to present racist stereotypes as the truth.

    I would quantify racism as disliking someone based on their race, of course... I don't want to sound like a dick here but that is the easiest way for me to explain it.

    I think there are just as many blacks who dislike white people just because they are white as there are white people who dislike blacks. Granted, history may give the blacks a reason to dislike whites but racism is racism regardless of the ability to justify it.

    steam_sig.png
  • BlackDog85BlackDog85 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Reading and seeing more of this, I took the whole thing as Imus making a shitty attempt at an "old white guy says black slang, FUNNAY!" joke, one where he clearly did cross a line, something he deserved to be reprimanded for.

    That said, I didn't buy into the firing. I don't know a damn thing about the man's private life; he could be a member of the Rainbow Coalition or the Ku Klux Klan, for all I know/care. However, I do know that he was extremely vocal on-air about blasting those commercials that tried to suggest that Harold Ford was sleeping with white women, as if that were a reason to not vote for him, due to their inherent racism. Then again, he's also made insensitive remarks about a ton of different ethnic/religious/social groups, but his roots are in shock-jockery, so no surprise.

    Again, I'm not at all excusing the guy for making an idiotic, racist joke, but I don't think telling a joke like that is what makes a person a bigot.

    That all said, a lot of comedians are right when they say he broke one of the golden rules of comedy: you do not put down/insult a person or group that has no pulpit to defend themselves. Rather, you go after the big and the powerful.

    I'm just glad that we won't have more protests clogging up my path to campus this week; it'd be great if more people at Rutgers actually got to protesting the hideous use of what little funds we have by the main offices, but that's another story.

    KeithBeKnives.png
    Wii Code: 5700 4466 3616 6981 (PM if y'all add me)
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Tw4win wrote: »
    I would quantify racism as disliking someone based on their race, of course... I don't want to sound like a dick here but that is the easiest way for me to explain it.

    I think there are just as many blacks who dislike white people just because they are white as there are white people who dislike blacks. Granted, history may give the blacks a reason to dislike whites but racism is racism regardless of the ability to justify it.

    But there are more white Americans than black Americans, so how can the two groups be equal in number? By virtue of being the majority, white Americans are less discriminated against.

    And there are far more discriminatory acts committed against minorities than are committed against the majority, for the same reason.

    Home-1.jpg
  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Tw4win wrote: »
    I would quantify racism as disliking someone based on their race, of course... I don't want to sound like a dick here but that is the easiest way for me to explain it.

    I think there are just as many blacks who dislike white people just because they are white as there are white people who dislike blacks. Granted, history may give the blacks a reason to dislike whites but racism is racism regardless of the ability to justify it.

    You may want to give this and this a good read.

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    celery77 wrote: »
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    Ok, so how about we start going through the lyrics of the most popular hip-hop/rap songs and compair them to the most popular pop/country/rock/puck songs? If you can't even admit that this is a bigger issue in popular hip-hop and rap than in most musical genres, then there really isn't any point in discussing this further.

    What does this have to do with "the black community"?

    I never said that it was a problem solely in the black community. I said that it is a much more rampant issue in hip-hop and rap than in other genres of music. I was just wondering why Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton haven't used their considerable influence to demand a boycott of record labels who are profitting off of something 1000 times more damaging that a hurtful joke made at the expense of a woman's basketball team.

  • JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    celery77 wrote: »
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    Ok, so how about we start going through the lyrics of the most popular hip-hop/rap songs and compair them to the most popular pop/country/rock/puck songs? If you can't even admit that this is a bigger issue in popular hip-hop and rap than in most musical genres, then there really isn't any point in discussing this further.

    What does this have to do with "the black community"?

    I never said that it was a problem solely in the black community. I said that it is a much more rampant issue in hip-hop and rap than in other genres of music. I was just wondering why Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton haven't used their considerable influence to demand a boycott of record labels who are profitting off of something 1000 times more damaging that a hurtful joke made at the expense of a woman's basketball team.

    Because the misogyny in popular hip-hop music is a symptom, not a root cause.

    whatifihadnofriendsshortenedsiggy2.jpg
  • TheCanManTheCanMan Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Jinnigan wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    Elkamil wrote: »
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    celery77 wrote: »
    And -- as we've pointed out repeatedly -- misogyny and the glorification of violence are hardly problems unique to "the black community" or even hip hop in general. It's stupid, and yes racially tinged, when you only choose to single out the black men who promote these messages, when we have other examples like the governor of the biggest, richest state in the Union who has fictionally murdered more men and degraded more women than the average gangsta rapper could hope to match in their entire recording career.

    When will the white community answer for that, hmmm?

    Ok, so how about we start going through the lyrics of the most popular hip-hop/rap songs and compair them to the most popular pop/country/rock/puck songs? If you can't even admit that this is a bigger issue in popular hip-hop and rap than in most musical genres, then there really isn't any point in discussing this further.

    What does this have to do with "the black community"?

    I never said that it was a problem solely in the black community. I said that it is a much more rampant issue in hip-hop and rap than in other genres of music. I was just wondering why Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton haven't used their considerable influence to demand a boycott of record labels who are profitting off of something 1000 times more damaging that a hurtful joke made at the expense of a woman's basketball team.

    Because the misogyny in popular hip-hop music is a symptom, not a root cause.

    So now Imus is a root cause of misogyny?

  • OboroOboro __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2007
    Demanding that boycott wouldn't do shit, just FYI. You cannot advocate an outcry in a public. The public must create outcry, and then those in positions of power will edify the outcry and bring it to a larger audience. The larger outcry, then, will incite further justified and safe action from those in positions of power, and if the outcry reaches a size and momentum where it threatens the finances financing the problem-- perhaps, in this case, by an enacted boycott-- then there can be an effective boycott.

    There's absolutely no value in just boycotts for the sake of boycotts. They're empty gestures.

    words
Sign In or Register to comment.