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Average CPU core temperatures.

BasicBasic Registered User
edited July 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Well I recently got a new PC, and its a high end one, its my first high end PC in fact, and I was actually wondering what is considered a safe temperature range for a high end PC.

Currently, my PC runs from 41-44 degrees Celcius on idle, 52-54 on load.

If it helps, I have 2.5 gig RAM, geforce 8800GTS, 700watt PSU and an AMD Athlon 64 FX-62 (2.8 gig per core).

So, is that an ok reading? Should I be worrying?

Basic on

Posts

  • embrikembrik Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Sounds normal to me. You should be fine. Mine idles between 44-46 depending on the room temperature, and gets to 48-50 on load. I run an AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400

    "Damn you and your Daily Doubles, you brigand!"

    I don't believe it - I'm on my THIRD PS3, and my FIRST XBOX360. What the heck?
  • BasicBasic Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Is that really?

    Sorry if that sounded a little rude, I just keep getting nervous when it gets above 50 degrees celcius.

    Especially since the only other friend I know with a high end PC gets much lower core temperatures (30-35 idle, 37-45 on load).

  • whuppinswhuppins Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    My old Athlon 3200 ran pretty consistently in the high 50's/low 60's idle, in a stuffy room in Florida in the summer. It did that for 3 years and a few times the dust would build up and restrict the airflow so much that I had to take it apart, reapply thermal paste, compressed air, the whole nine yards. It's still going strong, though I'm not using it as frequently now that I got a new machine.

    At any rate, those temperatures are just fine. Today's motherboards' default shutdown temps are generally in the 75+ range. Not to say that's a healthy range to shoot for, but low 50's is fine.

  • RookRook Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Basic wrote: »
    Is that really?

    Sorry if that sounded a little rude, I just keep getting nervous when it gets above 50 degrees celcius.

    Especially since the only other friend I know with a high end PC gets much lower core temperatures (30-35 idle, 37-45 on load).

    Max operating temperature (°C) 55 - 63
    http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/AMD-Athlon%2064%20FX-62%20-%20ADAFX62IAA6CS%20(ADAFX62CSBOX).html

    Not entirely sure why the max temperature is given as a range, although again like intel I think these are cover temps rather than core temperatures.

  • stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    The diodes that measure from the motherboard aren't reliable at all. They can are are frequently off by several degrees. If you are getting the measurement directly from the core of the cpu, like when using TAT with a coreduo cpu, the temp will be more accurate but also higher. So long as everything you throw at it runs with stability, your machine will be fine. All new processors will slow down if they reach a critical temperature. If you notice your machine slowing to a crawl, or alarms going off, then you should be worried.

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited July 2007
    The K8's can run up to 160 Fahrenheit, 50C is about 120F, you are well under the red line.

    The friggen dashboard in your car gets hotter.

  • BasicBasic Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Rook wrote: »
    Basic wrote: »
    Is that really?

    Sorry if that sounded a little rude, I just keep getting nervous when it gets above 50 degrees celcius.

    Especially since the only other friend I know with a high end PC gets much lower core temperatures (30-35 idle, 37-45 on load).

    Max operating temperature (°C) 55 - 63
    http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/AMD-Athlon%2064%20FX-62%20-%20ADAFX62IAA6CS%20(ADAFX62CSBOX).html

    Not entirely sure why the max temperature is given as a range, although again like intel I think these are cover temps rather than core temperatures.

    That worries me, because when I keep the PC running on load for a long time (6 or more hours), it gets even hotter to about 55-57 degrees.

  • happysharkhappyshark Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Basic wrote: »
    Rook wrote: »
    Basic wrote: »
    Is that really?

    Sorry if that sounded a little rude, I just keep getting nervous when it gets above 50 degrees celcius.

    Especially since the only other friend I know with a high end PC gets much lower core temperatures (30-35 idle, 37-45 on load).

    Max operating temperature (°C) 55 - 63
    http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/AMD-Athlon%2064%20FX-62%20-%20ADAFX62IAA6CS%20(ADAFX62CSBOX).html

    Not entirely sure why the max temperature is given as a range, although again like intel I think these are cover temps rather than core temperatures.

    That worries me, because when I keep the PC running on load for a long time (6 or more hours), it gets even hotter to about 55-57 degrees.


    so buy a custom heatsink/fan if it bothers you so much and if that doesnt work look into watercooling........

    http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=574&name=CPU-Fans-Heatsinks

  • RookRook Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Basic wrote: »
    Rook wrote: »
    Basic wrote: »
    Is that really?

    Sorry if that sounded a little rude, I just keep getting nervous when it gets above 50 degrees celcius.

    Especially since the only other friend I know with a high end PC gets much lower core temperatures (30-35 idle, 37-45 on load).

    Max operating temperature (°C) 55 - 63
    http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/AMD-Athlon%2064%20FX-62%20-%20ADAFX62IAA6CS%20(ADAFX62CSBOX).html

    Not entirely sure why the max temperature is given as a range, although again like intel I think these are cover temps rather than core temperatures.

    That worries me, because when I keep the PC running on load for a long time (6 or more hours), it gets even hotter to about 55-57 degrees.

    Well, see that entirely depends on what you're measuring. Basically, we always used to measure temperatures from a sensor placed just under the chip, and this is where you get the OMG 60degrees processor dies! reaction that many people have. Now the temperatures that we are using actually come from the core of the chip, which you expect to be 15-20 degrees higher than the outside of the chip, but confusingly the companies are still stating the cover surface for max operating temperatures rather than the core temperature.

    According to tomshardwareguide "Our tuned-up Athlon consumed about 140 W at 3.05 GHz under heavy load, and we measured core temperatures of 149° F (65° C) at the same time. The fan on a stock cooler has its work cut out at these temperatures, and operated at a rotational speed of 3300 RPM. This still leaves room for more speed, at least where temperatures are concerned. AMD indicates that the Windsor core temperature boundary is at 203° F (95° C)."

    If that's all a bit confusing, then unfortunately it is, and i'm still struggling to understand it all.

  • plantersplanters Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Mine idles at 53-56, 63-66 on load (more sometimes), the most it got up to was 81, I do not know how, now it shuts off at 73. But then again it is a P4 laptop.

    Shogun wrote:
    This is like the Italian Job only for :winky:
  • Akilae729Akilae729 Registered User
    edited July 2007
    Macbook Idles at 52 C and under load it often does in to the mid 70s, sometimes in the 80s.

    signaturebighe7.jpg
  • BasicBasic Registered User
    edited July 2007
    For the record, I have been using Core Temp for the temperature readings.

    Also, thanks everyone, your reassurances have been...well assuring.

  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    If you're really worried about it, get one of these bad boys:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185038

    As long as your case is big enough.

    steam_sig.png
  • FristleFristle Registered User
    edited July 2007
    You could go to your BIOS and enable the AMD Cool n' Quiet feature. It will dynamically reduce the CPU speed when the CPU is idle, so the CPU won't be as hot all the time.

    Fristle.jpg
  • victor_c26victor_c26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    If you're really worried about it, get one of these bad boys:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185038

    As long as your case is big enough.

    Don't those crack motherboards?

    I've heard horror stories from people that used those tower heatsinks.

    steam_sig.png
    MK: DS Code: 528.341.706.032 - Import from Play-Asia PSN: VictorX10
  • TechBoyTechBoy Registered User
    edited July 2007
    No no no no no! Ignore anyone telling you to go buy a better heatsink.

    Here's a fact: You cannot kill a CPU made within the last 5 or 6 years by overheating it. You can even wrench the heatsink OFF while running a game or doing some other CPU intense task and your CPU will be fine and dandy. Your program will most likely stop working. Windows will probably crash, but your hardware will be fine.

    Modern CPU's are designed to automatically throttle back when their internal sensors detect the heat getting too high. In other words, when your CPU starts noticing it is getting too hot, it will stop computing (or compute way slower than it normally does) and thus lower the amount of heat it generates to a point where it will not self-destruct.

    Now, if you notice that after hours of running a certain game the framerates suddenly start becoming extremely choppy, your CPU may be overheating and throttling itself and then it may be a good idea to get a new heatsink. However, the default heatsink is usually plenty fine for cooling your CPU as long as you keep dust from building up.

    Don't worry if your friend says his CPU runs cooler. That could be for a whole slew of reasons. He keeps his house cooler, his case has better airflow, he has a better heatsink, he's lying to you, etc. As long as your CPU isn't to the point where it is throttling, there is no advantage to having it run cooler. It won't make your framerate higher, it won't encode DVDs faster. The only possible benefit is that his CPU may, statistically speaking, have a longer lifespan than yours. I have never heard of someone's CPU dying. More likely than not your computer, new and badass as it now, will be a creaky pile of junk not worth using long before the CPU ever dies.

    Sooooo...

    TL;DR
    Don't worry, everything is fine. :lol:

    tf2_sig.png
  • victor_c26victor_c26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Is the emergency throttle BIOS dependent, or is it self sufficient?

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    MK: DS Code: 528.341.706.032 - Import from Play-Asia PSN: VictorX10
  • TechBoyTechBoy Registered User
    edited July 2007
    It is built in.

    Most bios's will do it too if you enable certain settings.

    tf2_sig.png
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    victor_c26 wrote: »
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    If you're really worried about it, get one of these bad boys:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185038

    As long as your case is big enough.

    Don't those crack motherboards?

    I've heard horror stories from people that used those tower heatsinks.

    With that one, the weight is pretty much all at the bottom, so there isn't really a lot of force on the motherboard.

    steam_sig.png
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