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Beginners Drawing Class - Week 6 - Logical Lights and Self Portrait Round Two: Fight!

anableanable Registered User regular
edited September 2007 in Artist's Corner
Originally I started off putting each week into it's own thread, but now I'm going to just update this thread with lessons each week.

Week One can be found in this thread.
Week Two can be found in this thread.
Week Three can be found in this very post!
Week Four can be found in this post.
Week Five can be found in this post.
Week Six can be found in this post.

Edges, Spaces, Relationships, oh my!
Drawing can be described as a combination of five perceptual skills:
  • Edges (the "shared" edges of a drawing)
  • Spaces (called negative spaces)
  • Relationships (perspective and proportion)
  • Lights and Shadows (shading)
  • Gestalt (the whole or "thingness" of that thing - not to be confused with "that thing I sent you")
    Spoiler:

Becoming proficient in these areas is essential for a well-rounded artist. This week we focus on edges, spaces, and relationships. Using the plastic plane and viewfinder, we are able to capture the 3D world on a 2D sheet of paper. Even famous artists like Van Gogh and Holbein utilized equipment similar to our plastic plane and viewfinder to help them get a handle on these ideas.

To ensure you get the most out of the lessons, it is a very good idea to read all of the instructions before beginning a given exercise. Also, lessons are beginning to build on one another more than before, so it is a good idea to do them in order.

Drawing on the picture plane:
Spoiler:

Modified contour drawing of your hand:
Spoiler:

Negative space drawing of a chair:
Before beginning this exercise it's important to get an understanding of what negative spaces are. The example used by Betty is to think of Bugs Bunny running through a hallway at high speed. He smashes through the door at the end of the hallway, leaving just the outline of his body in the door. The rest of the door is the "negative space" of Bugs Bunny. Part of our vases/faces exercise was also an example of negative spaces.
Spoiler:

anable on

Posts

  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Going forward, I'm probably just going to put the following weeks into this thread. With the limited response, there's no need for a new thread every week.

    In any case, here's my plastic panel hand trace and following sketch:

    hand-plastic.jpg

    hand-sketch.jpg

    I didn't get a chance to use the graphite because I bought the wrong type (pencil instead of stick). I'll use the graphite for the negative spaces chair drawing.

    negative-chair.jpg

    This started off well, but it went down hill when I tried to get the bottom negative spaces right. I also jacked up my proportions so that the chair didn't fit properly on the page. I couldn't get the plastic frame for the outline because it kept moving when I tried to hold it up in the air and draw the spaces. I realize now though why you're supposed to. Getting the proportions right is key.

  • The LittleMan In The BoatThe LittleMan In The Boat Registered User
    edited August 2007
    I read everyone of these, it's just I think we are lazy and caught up in are own things to actually that the time to go back to the basics.

    yerf.jpg
    I don't suffer from Insanity. I enjoy every minute of it.
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Good to know that the 234 people that viewed the thread so far didn't just click on the wrong link. :P

    In any case. This week is wrapped up. I'm going to keep posting the lessons, but like I mentioned, I'll just keep them in one thread.

  • NaregNareg Registered User
    edited August 2007
    yeah i'l post here in a bit

    Back off man, I'm a scientist!
  • murderbusmurderbus Registered User
    edited August 2007
    I'm still following along at home (from week 1 'till now), but I've been moving, so my computer is in disarray, and scanning is a mess. Thanks for these, though!

  • CrowlestonCrowleston Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Oh i feel like a bad student. I'm between jobs at the moment and have been out most of my time looking for one...

    useless but necessary objects of society.
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Beginners Drawing Class - Week 4 - Proportions and Perspective: I see what you did there

    This week we focus on relationships, or proportions and perspective. Relationships are what give images depth and convey a sense of 3D on a 2D plane. In previous exercises, our plastic plane helped us capture that depth. Betty advocates using a simple technique called "Sighting" to gain control of the relationships in your piece. Sighting is essentially a very informal way to capture your "Base Unit" and begin drawing from there.

    To ensure you get the most out of the lessons, it is a very good idea to read all of the instructions before beginning a given exercise. Also, lessons are beginning to build on one another more than before, so it is a good idea to do them in order.

    Proportions practice:
    Spoiler:

    Perspective practice:
    Spoiler:

    A "Real" Relationship drawing:
    Spoiler:

    You should now have a drawing that shows a basic understanding of the skills required to become a well rounded artist. This includes edges, spaces, relationships, and even shading. Congratulations!

  • FohnFohn Registered User
    edited August 2007
    I've been lurking around here for a very long time, admiring most everyone's work and aspiring to get better so I could contribute. So I listened to a lot of the advice and bought this book to help me along with my practice. Here we go...

    Negative Space Drawing (Lawn Chair):
    Spoiler:

    Modified Contour Drawing (My hand):
    Spoiler:

    The "Real" Relationship Drawing:
    Spoiler:

    Meh.
  • NaregNareg Registered User
    edited August 2007
    Crowleston wrote: »
    Oh i feel like a bad student. I'm between jobs at the moment and have been out most of my time looking for one...

    I have a job - and it takes ALL of my time......


    Please keep posting these anable. I am still following along and will be posting something sometime soon.

    Edit: Err, or is it over already??

    Back off man, I'm a scientist!
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Na, it's not over. I went to PAX this week and fooled myself into thinking I would be able to get any drawing time in. I'm moving this week, but I'm going to force myself to get these three exercises in. We'll start week five September 3rd.

    Also, Fohn: did you use a ruler on the "Real" relationship drawing? Those are amazingly straight.

  • FohnFohn Registered User
    edited August 2007
    anable wrote: »
    Also, Fohn: did you use a ruler on the "Real" relationship drawing? Those are amazingly straight.

    Yeah, I tried sketching them out and just decided to go over 'em with a straight edge.

    Meh.
  • NightDragonNightDragon Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Fohn, your lawn chair drawing seems less like a negative space study and more like a regular...positive ...space...study? :| ?

    Also, the proportions of things (mostly in your last drawing...for instance, the door handle and the door) seem kinda off. Put the negative space to work!

    rotate.php BloggerLink.gifTumblrLink.gif
  • FohnFohn Registered User
    edited August 2007
    Yeah, the last one really started to frustrate me so I just kinda threw some crap down without trying to observe proportions, which was the point of the excercise. Anyway, thanks for the observation.

    Meh.
  • NaregNareg Registered User
    edited August 2007
    anable wrote: »
    We'll start week five September 3rd.
    Roy Batty wrote: »
    TIME ENOUGH!!

    righthand2.jpg

    This hand looks smaller than it should be?

    And, I dunno what happened here...

    spacechair.jpg

    This was kind of a pain in the ass - I really had no way to keep the viewfinder steady. I also found it difficult to keep from outlining the chair instead of actually drawing the negative space... I think... Nightdragon - does my negative space study look more like a positive space... study?

    Eh, on with the show!

    Back off man, I'm a scientist!
  • NightDragonNightDragon Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Not really. One of the reasons why I said that to Fohn was because he'd drawn/made lines inside the space you're "not supposed to draw in". The arms of the chair, little details, etc. It also looks like he shaded the chair a little bit, but I'm not sure if that's just how it looks, or that's what he meant to do.

    You can't really help outlining stuff when you're making a negative space drawing - I mean, that's essentially what you do. The more "intersections" of objects you have, though, the more complicated the exercise becomes. If you have a simple object, like the chair you chose to draw, you're going to be doing more "direct outlining" of the object. If you have things that overlap, it gets more complicated, and you and up working more with negative space.

    Here's an example I did last year. When the branches/leaves were by themselves, yes, it was mostly just outlining. More of a "positive" study, I guess...but on the upper right-hand side, where there is a lot of overlapping of leaves, I had to work with the negative space quite a bit in order to define everything properly.

    rotate.php BloggerLink.gifTumblrLink.gif
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Wow. My brain is having a really hard time with perspective. I'm working on my perspective exercise (draw a corner using the angles as your guide) and I'm doing it here at work so I figured I can just draw my cubical corner and get the same results. From the angle that I'm looking at the corner, the top of the cubical is nearly flat while the bottom corner comes off at an angle, very similar to this picture:

    cubes2_lg.jpg

    I as able to draw this with moderate success (though I need plenty of practice on estimating my angles). I decided to draw one of the posters I have on my wall which starts very close to the top and runs about half way down the wall. Here is where I run into my problem. The poster looks completely level on the top and bottom. Is is what Betty is talking about when she says L-mode thinking. My brain knows that this poster is evenly cut so when I transfer it to paper, that's what it wants to draw. It took me almost ten minutes to finally find a shallow angle coming off the bottom of the poster before I could properly draw it.

    For me, this was my first real L-mode/R-mode conflict. Crazy stuff.

  • FohnFohn Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Not really. One of the reasons why I said that to Fohn was because he'd drawn/made lines inside the space you're "not supposed to draw in". The arms of the chair, little details, etc. It also looks like he shaded the chair a little bit, but I'm not sure if that's just how it looks, or that's what he meant to do.


    This may or may not be attributed to me trying to add more charcoal because I had erased a lot of it. I shaved some onto the paper and rubbed it in, fixing the eraser marks, but making the drawing unrecognisable. So I went over what linework I could see and ended up with that. Like I said, I dont know if that would have made it a 'positive space' study or not. Sorry if I sound like I'm making excuses.

    Meh.
  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I haven't had a chance to upload my "Real" Proportions drawing yet as I've been without internet since moving. I should get internet at my home this weekend and will upload that picture as well as this week's exercises then. Enough with the excuses; on to week five!

    Beginners Drawing Class - Week 5 - Portrait Drawing with Ease

    Despite the variety of faces we see each day, there are several consistences across all human faces. Beginning artists often suffer from drawing portraits to reflect the most prominent features of the face while neglecting the actual structure of facial anatomy.

    Here are some rules regarding the human face:
    1. The eyes are in the center of the skull, meaning from the eyes to the chin and from the eyes to the top of the skull should be the same length. This can be difficult for many students because the numerous features on the bottom portion of the face tend to "hog" the space on the skull. This is inaccurate however.
    2. An equilateral (same on all sides) triangle is formed when drawing a line from the eye to the back of the ear, and from the back of the ear to the bottom of the chin and then from the bottom of the chin, back up to the eye.
    3. A line from the space between the mouth and nose should go back, just below the ear, and to the point where the neck meets the skull.

    Here is an unfortunately small example of these rules followed properly in art:
    head-proportions-half.jpg

    And here is an unfortunately small example of these rules followed properly in life:
    019.jpg

    Now let's practice putting these rules to work.

    As before, to ensure you get the most out of the lessons, it is a very good idea to read all of the instructions before beginning a given exercise. Also, lessons are building on one another more than before, so it is a good idea to do them in order.


    Profile Warm-up Exercise:
    Spoiler:

    Profile of a Person:
    Spoiler:

    There are only two exercises this week, but don't rush through them. When you are done, they will both be excellent examples of the lessons learned regarding edges, spaces, relationships, lights and shadows, and the gestalt.

  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    My internet connection has been delayed another week, but I swear I'm doing these lessons. Hopefully you are as well. :P Expect updates this Saturday.

    Beginners Drawing Class - Week 6 - Logical Lights and Self Portrait Round Two: Fight!

    Shading (or in proper art terminology - light logic) helps tremendously in giving a pictures a sense of depth. Because of this, it is often one of the more sought after techniques by beginning artists. The key to learning light logic is remembering the types of shading created by light, and being able to actively see the difference in tones as they appear in real life. Pale, light tones are considered "high" in value, with darker tones considered "low" in value. The lightest tone is the white of the paper, and the darkest tone is where the graphite from the pencil is closest together.

    blend400.JPG

    tones200.jpg

    Light logic is broken down into four types:
    Highlight: The lightest portion(s) of the image where the source falls most directly on the object.
    Cast shadow: The darkest shadow caused by the image blocking the source of light.
    Reflected light: A dim light, bounced back onto the object by light falling on surfaces around the object.
    Crest shadow: A shadow on the crest of a rounded form, between the highlight and the reflected light.

    This portrait of artist Henry Fuseli utilizes highlights (on the forehead and cheek), cast shadows (from the bridge of the nose and under the chin), reflected light (on pretty much the entire right side of his face), and crest shadows (on the crest of the temple and hands).

    fuselsp.jpg

    One of the techniques used to control tone while drawing is known as crosshatching. Crosshatching is simply laying down a carpet of pencil strokes, often crossing strokes multiple times. The end result is looks something like:

    xhtch.gif

    Crosshatching does not require straight lines. Lines are often curved to help create tones on objects that are not flat. An important thing to remember when crosshatching is that the lines should be created by movement of your entire arm and not just your wrist. When crosshatching, your wrist should remain mostly stationary.

    As before, to ensure you get the most out of the lessons, it is a very good idea to read all of the instructions before beginning a given exercise. Also, lessons should be done in order.

    Warm Up: Gustave Corbet's Self Portrait:
    Spoiler:

    Self Portrait with Articulated Lights and Shadows:
    Spoiler:

    Once you have completed the self portrait, compare it to the pre-instruction portrait. You should see a recognizable difference in your ability as an artist. Note the various techniques you used to create second image and how it creates a more realistic representation than your original image.

    This is, technically, the end of the lessons taught by Betty in her five day class. There are a few more lessons in the book regarding the sixth and seventh artist skills (memory and imagination), as well as some information on utilizing colors. If anyone is interested, I can do those as well. If not, thank you to those who participated and helped motivate me to branch out and try this art thing.

  • anableanable Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    A day late, but here we go.

    The "Real" Perspective drawing:
    perspective.jpg

    Madame X:
    madamex.jpg

    I couldn't find anyone willing to pose for me for the profile picture. I think I will have someone on Monday though so it should be done then.

    Goustav Courbet:
    courbet.jpg

    I am crazy happy with the way the Courbet drawing came out. At first, it was the hardest piece I had done because I felt like was running blind. It was so different from all of the other lessons so far. In the end though, it's definitely my best piece, in my opinion.

    I still need to do the second self portrait. I hope to get it done early next week.

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